The Crucial Importance of Taking Care of Your Liver

LSA Caps provide unsurpassed nutrient support for this all-important organ


BY STEVE BORN

It’s not exaggeration to state that a lot of people take their liver health for granted. We go to great lengths to protect our hearts, brains, and other bodily organs, but oftentimes we neglect to take care of our liver. One possible reason for this is that the liver is one of the body’s most resilient organs, the only one capable of regenerating itself. We may think that because of this, we don’t need to focus too much on keeping it healthy. Another possible reason is that the symptoms surrounding a less-than-ideally functioning liver may not be glaringly obvious and that those symptoms may be similar to other medical conditions, which can cause us to focus elsewhere in our bodies for answers.

The fact is, we simply cannot ignore our liver’s health and optimal functioning, not if we hope to perform our best athletically and, more importantly, enjoy the highest-quality and potentially longest life possible.

Regarding the former goal, statements from liver-specific research [1] is undeniably clear:

The accelerated metabolic demands of the working muscle cannot be met without a robust response from the liver. If not for the hepatic [relating to the liver] response, sustained exercise would be impossible. If not for the increased hepatic glucose output with exercise, hypoglycemia would result due to inadequate breakdown of glycogen stores and recycling of metabolites through the gluconeogenic pathway.

The liver is a battery, a rechargeable battery at that. It releases stored energy at times of high metabolic demand and replenishes energy stores during the nutrient excess associated with a meal. The liver is a recycler converting metabolites into macronutrients, amino acids into proteins, and transforming potential energy into chemical energy. The liver is a detoxifier removing nitrogenous molecules, hemoglobin, hormones, foreign substances, immunoglobulin, and other compounds from the circulation. Physical exercise poses a unique challenge to the liver as metabolic demands of working muscles require the liver to mobilize energy stores, recycle metabolites, and convert compounds that are toxic in excess to innocuous forms.

These statements should make it abundantly clear that the liver is hugely involved in exercise performance and recovery. To be a better athlete—to perform better during exercise and recover more completely between training sessions—you must take care of your liver!

The same is true—even more so—for overall health. As the liver is responsible for more than 500 vital life functions [2], you’d be hard-pressed to find an organ that works anywhere near as much or as hard. Perhaps the liver’s most well-known functions are detoxifying, filtering, and helping remove harmful toxins, chemicals, and bacteria in the blood as well as those toxins we are exposed to on a daily basis.

The same is true—even more so—for overall health. As the liver is responsible for more than 500 vital life functions [2], you’d be hard-pressed to find an organ that works anywhere near as much or as hard. Perhaps the liver’s most well-known functions are detoxifying, filtering, and helping remove harmful toxins, chemicals, and bacteria in the blood as well as those toxins we are exposed to on a daily basis.

Are you getting the picture that the liver is at or near the top in regards to “running the show” for exercise performance and overall health? With the liver responsible for so many areas in both, it’s no stretch at all to state that when liver function is compromised, so too is the quality of your workouts and races, and, more importantly, your health.

Are you getting the picture that the liver is at or near the top in regards to “running the show” for exercise performance and overall health? With the liver responsible for so many areas in both, it’s no stretch at all to state that when liver function is compromised, so too is the quality of your workouts and races, and, more importantly, your health.

What’s in LSA Caps and What They do

Artichoke Leaf Extract 10:1 (Cynara Scolymus) – The compounds that make up artichoke leaf—primarily cynarin—have demonstrated antioxidant action and the ability to help maintain healthy digestion and liver function through promotion of healthy bile flow.

Broccoli Extract 20:1 – Broccoli, like all cruciferous vegetables, contains an organic sulfur compound called sulforaphane, which helps increase levels of detoxification enzymes and protect the liver from damage.

Milk Thistle (80% Silymarin) – Silymarin (pronounced SILL-ee-MAR-inn) is a flavonoid extract from the seeds of the milk thistle plant and is touted as one of the most potent liver-protecting substances known.

N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) – N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine is the nontoxic, bioactive form of the amino acid cysteine and is readily assimilated into the body from the intestine. NAC itself has antioxidant properties and is a precursor for the endogenous production of glutathione, arguably the most potent antioxidant there is. NAC’s protective powers are hard to overstate; it is frequently used in medical settings to treat liver toxicity associated with acetaminophen overdose (poisonous mushrooms as well) (Hazai et al. 2001; Attri et al. 2001).

BlueRich® Blueberry Concentrate 36:1 – Blueberries contain a number of compounds—namely anthocyanins and pterostilbene (pronounced terro-STILL-bean)—that have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, both of which help protect liver function and aid in preventing liver cell damage. BlueRich® is a super-concentrated (equal to over 1/3 cup of whole blueberries), all-natural, and GMO-free standardized blueberry extract.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) – Has liver-protective capabilities and works with NAC to help boost bodily levels of glutathione. Vitamin C also helps maintain the stability of NAC.

Selenium (L-Selenomethonine) – This trace mineral, chelated to the amino acid methionine for superior absorption, is involved in the endogenous production of glutathione. Low selenium levels have been shown to correlate with increased risk of liver cancer risk.

Molybdenum (Molybdenum Glycinate) – This trace mineral, chelated to the amino acid glycine for maximum bioavailability, plays a significant role in the production of a number of important enzymes and enzymatic reactions, including xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase, which are involved in the liver's detoxification of environmental toxins, alcohol, and certain drugs.

Summary

I really like Dr. Tierra’s description of the liver as a “citadel” because I think it’s 100% appropriate and accurate. As a physical structure, a citadel is defined as a strong castle in a city or town that sheltered people from harm and kept them safe. The liver is your body’s citadel, protecting nearly every aspect of human health and helping keep other bodily organs and systems safe and functioning properly.

When you take care of your liver, you can enjoy maximal benefits both during your workouts and races and when they’re completed, and you help ensure that your liver continues to do its job in so many areas of your overall health with top efficiency.

Because of, among many things, the high volume of free radicals and metabolic waste products that athletes produce during their workouts, their livers are usually working overtime. That’s why athletes need to be especially cognizant of doing everything possible to protect this vitally important organ.

Along with your efforts to consume the highest-quality diet possible—one that restricts salt and sugar, contains a wide range of fruits and vegetables, and includes sufficient fiber [3]—two capsules of LSA Caps twice daily provides ideal amounts of key liver-benefiting nutrients. It’s simply an extraordinary product that will nourish your liver and help it maintain maximum performance.

REFERENCES:
1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4826571/
[2]https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=85&ContentID=P00676
[3] “Focus on Fiber” at https://www.hammernutrition.com/media/downloads/ENews/ENissue114.pdf (page 46)