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Can Hammer Gel "spoil"

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Can Hammer Gel "spoil"

Postby smarkgraf » Thu Jul 12, 2012 8:36 am

I live in Phoenix. I ride both mornings and afternoons(commute). I usually carry a flask of Hammer Gel with me whenever I ride. If I don't use it all, I just put it in the fridge for next time. Next ride, I may or may not add more. Can the gel spoil or go bad from repeated temp cycles.
fridge -> morning ride(hot) -> drawer at work -> afternoon ride(very hot) -> fridge.

Thanks
Steve
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Re: Can Hammer Gel "spoil"

Postby steve-born » Fri Jul 13, 2012 11:53 am

Hello Steve -

It's highly, highly unlikely. Hammer Gel is simply complex carbohydrates, a couple of natural sweeteners, sodium chloride (salt), potassium (natural preservative), and 4 amino acids (l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-valine, and l-alanine).

To confirm my hypothesis, I asked Dr. Bill if he could provide any information. Here's what he wrote:

"Brian Frank (owner of Hammer Nutrition) once tested Hammer Gel by leaving it on the hood of a car for over 8-hours in the heat with no ill effects. The same Hammer Gel was shelved for almost a year indoors with no harmful mold or bacteria growth. Like oils, if the color of the maltodextrin-maltrin product turns dark or begins to smoke, it is beginning to gelatinize or form compounds that render it not as good as original.

The Mailliard Reaction is responsible for bread crusts, chocolate, coffee, dark beers, and roasted meats. The sequence begins at about 220°F/115°C when a carbohydrate molecule and an amino acid bind together in an unstable structure, producing flavorful by-products. The involvement of amino acids brings nitrogen and sulfur creating meaty and earthy flavors. These reactions create that crust on seared foods and the brown coloring of a good roast as well as multitudes of other browned foods.

Both caramelization and the Maillard Reaction require relatively high temperatures beginning above the boiling point of water 212°F/100°C. As a result, wet processes such as boiling and steaming will never be able to brown foods because the temperature of the food will only get as high as the 212°F with slight adjustment due to elevation and atmospheric conditions. Dry methods are able to reach much higher temperatures allowing the browning reactions to occur. This is why braised foods are usually seared first to create those flavors and colors that otherwise won't occur in a wet, low temperature setting. {Reference: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/209/Heat-Transfer-and-Browning-Foods}

--- END ---

Your Hammer Gel, though exposed to some pretty warm-to-hot temps, do not appear to come anywhere near the limits where it would degrade.

I hope this helps.

Sincerely -

Steve
************************
Steve Born
Fueling Expert
Event Sponsorship Coordinator
www.hammernutrition.com
800.336.1977
************************
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Re: Can Hammer Gel "spoil"

Postby smarkgraf » Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:58 pm

Thank You,

Steve
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