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nauseous

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nauseous

Postby konati » Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:38 pm

About 2 hours into a 50 mile mt bike race today I really thought everything was going to come up. I followed all suggested fueling outlines. It was hot and humid but I am puzzled as to what happened.

Any tho ughts would be helpfull.

Vince Talese :(
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Re: nauseous

Postby steve-born » Mon Aug 01, 2011 3:35 pm

Hello Vince -

I have a saying that I refer to often: "Have a game plan but write in pencil, not in ink." What I mean by that is what may have worked fueling-wise during a workout - which is usually much less stressful (I know my stomach gets tied up into knots come race morning) - may not work come race day. This is especially true when the weather is hot and humid, and even more so if you're not acclimated to the weather conditions. This is true when it comes to your fueling "game plan" and your pace during the race.

Case in point: A few years ago I was working at a 24-hour mountain bike race. For weeks we had really cool days, somewhere in the low-to-mid 50's. All of a sudden, only a couple of days before the race - and on race day itself - the temperatures had kicked up up to and over 30 degrees... absolutely no one was acclimated to those conditions because no one had a chance to train in them!

As I watched the pro riders doing the 24-hour solo event blaze through the first couple of laps I thought to myself (as I was working the Hammer booth, which was right near the start/finish line), "These guys are going awful fast; I can't believe they'll be able to keep that kind of pace up in these conditions." When a few people came by the booth they said the same thing, at which point I answered, "Well, if they can maintain this kind of pace in this heat then more power to them. But I'll bet you they're going to fade away, even have to drop out, before sundown."

And sure enough, they did. Why? Because they did not alter their pace in deference to the weather. Now, the same is true when it comes to your fueling - what may have worked in training conditions, which may have been cooler and certainly at more relaxed pace - may not be appropriate when it comes to race day, especially if it's hot and humid and even more so when if you're not acclimated to it.

Remember, the goal of fueling is to consume the least amount of fuel (primarily calories) to keep your body what you want it to do hour after hour after hour... the least amount. And if anything, if you err on the "not enough" side that's a whole lot easier problem to fix than an, "uh oh, I overdid it on the calories and now my stomach is very upset with me." The latter scenario is a much harder hole to dig yourself out of. Not enough calories? Easy problem to fix; you simply take on some more. Too many calories? At the very least your stomach is going to be rebelling a bit, sometimes to the point where you're going to hurl.

So without knowing exactly what your intake was, it's hard for me to pinpoint exactly what went wrong. But if you'll take my saying - "Have a game plan but write in pencil, not in ink" - and apply that to your race fueling strategy (meaning that you'll be willing to alter it in deference to the weather), then I'm sure the results will be must more pleasant and successful.

Lastly, if you weren't doing so already, I would highly recommend that you adopt the strategies outlined in the article "Proper Fueling - Pre-workout & race suggestions" at http://www.hammernutrition.com/knowledg ... .1279.html

This article has, by far, generated the most skepticism but in my own athletic career, as well as after working with thousands of athletes, I have no doubt whatsoever that the principles outlined in the article work... and they work like a charm. At the very least, fasting 3 hours prior to an event that's longer than 60 minutes (perhaps up to 90 minutes) will minimize-to-eliminate stomach issues... there's nothing fun about starting a race with food still in your stomach going through the digestive process.

I hope these suggestions help!

Sincerely -

Steve



About 2 hours into a 50 mile mt bike race today I really thought everything was going to come up. I followed all suggested fueling outlines. It was hot and humid but I am puzzled as to what happened.
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Steve Born
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Event Sponsorship Coordinator
www.hammernutrition.com
800.336.1977
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