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Nitric Oxide

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Nitric Oxide

Postby ezclimb » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:51 am

I've been using Hammer/Ecaps products for years with great success. Wondering if anyone has had any positive or negative experience consuming Nitric Oxide as part of their daily regimen. (Just a little background- I cycle 6 days a week and currently training for several Sportives, including L'Etape du tour in July) Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
-Ed
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Re: Nitric Oxide

Postby levi-hoch » Thu Apr 28, 2011 12:11 pm

Hello Ed,

This is an email I had saved from Steve in response to a similar question asked previously. This explains why Hammer Nutrition does not offer an arginine or nitric oxide supplement. Hope you find it helpful.

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As you probably know, arginine is - for the most part - considered a non-essential amino acid, meaning that it can be manufactured by the human body and does not necessarily need to be obtained directly through the diet or via supplementation. Sometimes, however, it is considered a semi-essential amino acid because, although the body manufactures its own supply, there are times when dietary supplementation may be required, such as in the case of severe wounds or illness. In addition, newborns are not able to make their own supply of this substance, so arginine is considered essential in the first months of life. Among its many, many functions, arginine is used to produce nitric oxide (NO), a chemical that causes blood vessel relaxation (vasodilation).

As far as increasing/boosting nitric oxide production via high-dose arginine supplementation or one of the many arginine-based, NO-boosting supplements available (mainly in the bodybuilding supplement industry), Dr. Bill Misner writes:

"[We] do not recommend raising or lowering some substances, which the body makes for special occasions finely monitored by internal biochemical sensors. Nitric Oxide is one of those substances, hence I do not recommend attempts to raise it or lower it by use of any exogenous substance unless under the supervision of a Physician. Monoxidil is a synthetic version of Nitric Oxide. Topical Monoxidil formulations are applied to the scalp for increasing blood flow to the scalp and restoring hair growth.

Nitric oxide is a colorless, neutral gaseous compound of nitrogen and oxygen (i.e. nitrogen oxide). Although most exogenous nitrogen oxides are toxic to human health, endogenous nitric oxide participates in several essential functions within the body. Nitric oxide has recently been elevated by researchers to the status of a neurotransmitter. NO molecules have a very short "life" - their half-life is approximately five seconds. In my opinion, nature intends this to be a short and limited endogenous expression, therefore it should be tightly regulated by letting the body to make its own when necessary. It has a two-edged sword -- too much can cause excessive vascular dilation and too little can cause excessive restriction. Here is what can happen with man-made dose: Nitric oxide reacts with superoxide free radicals to form peroxynitrite. Excessive production of nitric oxide generates peroxynitrite free radicals. This occurs from nitric oxide reacting with superoxide free radicals to form peroxynitrite free radicals.

Personally, I prefer to leave this endogenous substance to the discretion of natural internal monitor sensing and production. Enclosed below my are reference citings for your review.

References

*** Benelli, A., et al. Nitric oxide is involved in male sexual behavior of rats. Eur J Pharmacol. 249(2-3):505-510, 1995.
*** Chowienczyk, P., et al. Arginine: NO more than a simple amino acid? The Lancet. 35:901-902, 1997.
*** Moncada, S., et al. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide from L-arginine. Biochemical Pharmacology. 38:1709-1715, 1989.

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The soy protein component in our long distance fuels, Sustained Energy and Perpetuem, as well as in the Hammer Soy product, contain naturally-occurring high amounts of arginine, as does a plethora of foods. So unless a specific diagnosis for arginine supplementation is determined via a health care professional (such as for hypertension), taking arginine supplements or any of the NO-boosting supplements isn't necessary and may be more problematic than helpful. This is obviously a conservative recommendation that Dr. Misner makes but it's one that I definitely agree with. Too much of anything, even if it's good and beneficial for you, may produce unwanted effects.

--

Please let us know if you have any questions. Thanks Ed!
Regards,
Levi
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Re: Nitric Oxide

Postby ezclimb » Thu Apr 28, 2011 2:51 pm

Perfect.
-Ed
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