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Source of Maltodextrin?

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Re: Source of Maltodextrin?

Postby steve-born » Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:59 pm

Hello Michael -

Dr. Bill Misner had the best answer to your question. He writes:

"The highly refined finished maltodextrin in Hammer Nutrition's product line originates from conventionally grown and organic grown corn. These corn maltodextrins are neither certified organic or GMO-free. The refining process converts whole corn to long-chain glucose polymers (a.k.a. complex carbohydrates) that generate a remarkably high glycemic effect through first-pass metabolism. This high glycemic effect resolves high blood sugar turnover depletion during extreme exercise sessions."

"Some (30-50%) of the corn maltodextrin is GMO-free while I estimate perhaps as much as 70% is exposed to GMO residue in either seed or insecticide. Once GMO-free and GMO corn products are mixed, GMO residue contents are diluted, but still present. The cost for GMO-free maltodextrin is higher than the bulk of crops grown all over our country from mega-farms. Organic crop harvests way less than conventional grown, hence the huge differences in price."

"PCR (polymerase chain reaction) GMO-detection tests done on Hammer maltodextrins are 'negative,' but does not imply GMO-residues, since by more precise measures GMO measures may be detected. The detected levels of GMO-free maltodextrins originate from organic grown crops must have very, very low-to-NO GMO's based on more precise detection measures before being certified GMO-free. When I suggest that PCR detection is negative, that means there is none detected by the limits of that test method. Thus, the corn maltodextrin processed via Grain Processing Corporation is essentially gluten free, but cannot be declared GMO-free."

--- END ---

In essence, what Dr. Misner is saying is that the cost of using pure GMO-free corn to produce maltodextrin is tremendously expensive. Additionally, the testing that is currently used to detect GMOs indicates that there are none detected, though there may be (key word "may") if even more precise methods (say, parts per billion instead of parts per million?) were used.

Sincerely -

Steve
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Re: Source of Maltodextrin?

Postby Mitch_S » Tue Mar 22, 2011 3:20 pm

Steve,

A follow-up:
The fruit jam I use recently added maltodextrin (to my displeasure) to its otherwise purely fruit-derived ingredients. It seems this was done to increase its fiber content. Yet when I think of fiber, I think "undigestable," or at least "not-easily digestable," which doesn't translate into the "quick-energy" that the maltodextrin in Hammer products is supposed to provide.

Are there different forms of maltodextrin that can supply easily-digested energy or fiber depending on their structure?

Mitch
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Re: Source of Maltodextrin?

Postby steve-born » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:23 am

Hello Mitch -

To my understanding, there are different types of maltodextrins available, all of which have varying percentages of one-chain to five-chain carbohydrates (monosaccarides, dissaccarides, trisaccarides, tetrasaccarides, and pentasaccarides) as part of their natural composition. Obviously, the higher the medium-to-long-chain carbohydrates (trisaccarides, tetrasaccarides, and pentasaccarides) the better. I can't tell you the exact breakdown of the maltodextrin we use in our products but the overwhelming majority (about 96%) is comprised of medium-to-long chain carbohydrates, so it is definitely a very high quality maltodextrin source.

After processing, most maltodextrins have minuscule-to-nil amounts of fiber in them. However (and I didn't know this until now), there appears to be another kind of maltodextrin called "resistant" or maltodextrin-soluble fiber. From what I've read, this "resistant maltodextrin" was developed by using natural enzymes to transform the linkages between glucose molecules in conventional maltodextrin to a form that is not digested in the upper digestive tract. Confusing huh?!?!

With this exception, however - and I've only been able to find one product that contains this "resistant maltodextrin" in it - most maltodextrins are essentially fiber free and readily absorbed.

As far as the jam that you're using, it should list the amount of fiber in a serving, which you can compare to an older version of the product (assuming you still have a jar of it). That will tell you if they've added something to it (perhaps even this "resistant maltodextrin") that would increase its fiber content. If you want to list the product that you're taking I can perhaps find some additional information about it that will determine what the company has added to increase its fiber content, if in fact it has been increased.

I hope this helps!

Sincerely -

Steve
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Re: Source of Maltodextrin?

Postby Mitch_S » Sat Apr 02, 2011 3:24 pm

Steve,

Thanks for the research and response; I very much appreciate it. I assume the jam (Polaner All Fruit) does indeed use the "resistant" form of maltodextrin, as its fiber content went from nil to 3g/Tbsp.

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Re: Source of Maltodextrin?

Postby steve-born » Mon Apr 04, 2011 1:56 pm

Hello Mitch -

I dug a little deeper and looked for more information. What I found is that you are correct; the fiber that this company is now using is the same "resistant" form of maltodextrin called Fibersol-2.

Sincerely -

Steve
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