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Quality in PIC

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Quality in PIC

Postby knjwes » Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:43 pm

Just a quick question. I was reading an article entitled "Guidelines for Choosing Supplements" at the following site http://www.beyondhealth.com/Articles and it stated the following: any multivitamin that contains iron, copper or iodine, is an inferior formula. These ingredients are oxidants, which can damage the vitamins/antioxidants contained in the pill." I noticed that Premium Insurance Caps have both copper and iodine in them and wanted to know your thoughts. Thank you for your time.

-Kirk
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Re: Quality in PIC

Postby steve-born » Mon Aug 30, 2010 12:56 pm

Hello Kirk -

I respectfully disagree with that statement and wonder how the author can come to such a conclusion without anything to back it up.

Copper, iron, and iodine are all essentials minerals that are necessary for numerous functions in the body, far too many to discuss here. In and of themselves, however, they are not oxidants or have pro-oxidant capabilities. It is only when excess amounts are taken when pro-oxidant and/or other issues may occur.

The Optimal Daily Intake (ODI) for iron is 15 - 25 mg for men and 18 - 30 mg per day for women. Below I've attached an article as to why Premium Insurance Caps do not contain any iron.

The ODI for copper is 0.5 - 2 mg for both men and women. 7 capsules of Premium Insurance Caps contains 1 mg of copper. Excess copper intake reduces the body's levels of zinc and vitamin C, which is one of the reasons why taking large amounts of copper is not recommended. As far as toxicity is concerned, Dr. Michael Colgan writes, "Daily intakes up to 10 mg, and occasion intakes of up to 100 mg have not shown toxicity."

REFERENCE: Recheigl M, ed Nutrition Disorders Vol. 1. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1978

The ODI for iodine is 150 - 300 mcg for me and women. 7 capsules of Premium Insurance Caps contains 112.5 mcg of iodine. Colgan writes, "Athletes may need a lot more iodine than the general popluation because you lose a lot in sweat." As far as toxicity is concerned, Dr. Colgan writes, "Iodine is not toxic up to 2,000 mcg daily."

REFERENCE: Recommended Daily Allowances 10th Edition. Washington, DC: Rational Academy Press, 1989

IRON – Yes or No?

By: Bill Misner, Ph.D. and Steve Born

Two questions we frequently field are “how come Premium Insurance Caps don’t contain iron?” and “do I need to take iron supplements?”

Iron, as most athletes know, is found in every cell in the body, as it is an important mineral for all body functions. Most of the body’s iron is in the form of hemoglobin, found in the red blood cells. A smaller portion of iron is found in myoglobin, a type of hemoglobin that is found in muscle tissue, and in the oxidative enzymes within the mitochondria. Hemoglobin is responsible for oxygen transport from the lungs to the muscles. Both myoglobin and oxidative enzymes are major components in energy production. Iron is also very important in immune system function.

It’s apparent that iron is an extremely important nutrient, especially for endurance athletes. An iron deficiency can negatively affect oxygen transport to the muscles if below-levels of hemoglobin are detected. An iron deficiency can also impair energy production if myoglobin and mitochondrial enzymes are sub-normal. However, there are also risks involved (increased free radical production being one) from too-high iron intake. So do we need to take supplemental iron? Why don’t Premium Insurance Caps contain iron?

Most Americans if they consume adequate calories via balanced menu, consume enough iron without the need to supplement iron. Lieberman & Bruning (1990) recommend an Optimal Daily Intake (ODI) of 15-25 mg for men and 20-30 mg for women, daily iron intake. It is very easy to exceed these values from food alone. In humans, high levels of storage iron as well as low iron binding capacity are considered at-risk for ischemic heart disease progression. The mechanism for this is likely elevated hydroxyl radical production due to an enlarged transit iron pool. Researchers van Jaarsveld, Kuyl, & Wiid determined whether diet-containing iron concentrations near the recommended upper limit tended to alter the degree of myocardial ischemic/reperfusion injury in rats or whether simultaneous antioxidant supplementation had cardiovascular-debilitating effects. [Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol 1994 Dec;86(3):273-85]

If an athlete consumes excessive above RDA levels of dietary iron, they may experience an increase in harmful free radical oxygen species damages. Such increases in free radical levels may impose premature fatigue or further neutralize the supply circulating exogenous antioxidants.

IRON INTAKE FROM FOOD INTAKE OF ATHLETES AND NON-ATHLETES
The above results may implicate an iron-supplemented diet as imposing increased degree of oxidative injury if simultaneous antioxidant supplementation prevented much of this increase. Twenty three customers, 16 athletes and 9 non-athlete’s iron food intake was determined by computer-generated dietary analysis performed over a 36-month period.

ENDURANCE ATHLETES
Males – Daily Iron Intake From Foods N=9 AVERAGE=279%
Females – Daily Iron Intake From Foods N=7 AVERAGE=193%

SEDENTARY NON ATHLETES
Males – Daily Iron Intake From Foods N=4 AVERAGE=158%
Females – Daily Iron Intake From Foods N=5 AVERAGE=115%

Male athletes [279% x RDA] and female athletes [193% x RDA] consume more calories than sedentary counterparts, therefore their total iron intake from food sources exceeds dramatically their required daily allowance (by a combined average of average of 241% x RDA). This along with the advice of a cardiovascular surgeon led us to remove iron from Premium Insurance Caps.

This also is the basis for the suggestion that blood serum markers of iron deficiency substantiate and be medically monitored during any sort of iron supplementation, dose, and duration. Editors at the Life Extension Foundation have suggested not taking iron supplements unless a blood test reveals a deficiency. According to the Foundation, “Most people have too much iron in their body. Excess iron generates massive free radical reactions. Human epidemiological studies show that those with high iron levels are far more likely to contract cancer and heart disease. A growing body of evidence implicates iron in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.”

So for the majority of us, adequate iron is easily obtained from the diet and supplemental amounts are not necessary. If you aren’t sure about your iron status, a CBC (Complete Blood Count)/Chemistry Profile blood test will determine what your iron status is and whether supplementation is necessary.

--- END ---

I hope you will find this information helpful Kirk.

Sincerely -

Steve
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Re: Quality in PIC

Postby rsmith » Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:21 pm

Steve, thank you for your terrific response related to iron deficiency in athletes..8/29/2010.

53 years old, avid cyclist..have had a chronic issue with iron deficiency, recent blood panel (4/2011) showed Fe level of 20 (normal range 40++). Opinions among experts appears to wide ranging. Any thoughts on the different types of iron supplements with best best absorption rates..thanks
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Re: Quality in PIC

Postby steve-born » Tue May 03, 2011 10:38 am

Hello rsmith -

The problem with many iron supplements is that they tend to cause GI irritation and/or constipation for those who have to take them. One form, iron bisglycinate, appears to be a non-constipating form of this mineral. And, since it is chelated to an amino acid (glycine), its absorption rate should be excellent.

Solgar makes a very good iron bisglycinate product called "Gentle Iron." You might be able to find this at a decent health food store. If not, an online store called iHerb.com sells it. I have no affiliation with Solgar or iHerb.com but I do think that both companies are excellent. The direct link for the Solgar product from iHerb.com is http://www.iherb.com/Solgar-Gentle-Iron ... 10625?at=0

Another form that I am not terribly familiar with is Iron Protein Succinylate, which is also purported to not have GI-irritating and constipation issues associated with it. Jarrow Formulas makes a product called IronSorb that uses this particular form of iron (http://www.iherb.com/Jarrow-Formulas-Ir ... s/188?at=0).

Either product should be just fine, should you be required to take an iron supplement. The Solgar brand contains 25 mg of iron per capsule and the Jarrow brand contains 18 mg of iron per capsule.

Hope this helps!

Steve
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Event Sponsorship Coordinator
www.hammernutrition.com
800.336.1977
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