Endurance News - Issue 58 - May 2008
New HEED, Recoverite, and Whey now here!
Steve Born



favor-wise. Needless to say, we think you’re really going to like these two new favors! Both Subtle Berry and Mild Melon are available in single serving packets or in 32-serving/scoop containers.
Also now available are the 80-serving/scoop containers of HEED in
We’re excited to announce the availability of fantastic new favors of some of your favorite Hammer Nutrition fuels! Along with the current versions of HEED that we offer—Mandarin Orange, Lemon-Lime, and Unfavored—we’ve added two additional refreshing favors, Subtle Berry and Mild Melon.
As we always do prior to releasing any new favor of a Hammer Nutrition fuel, we tested many favor variations and possibilities before agreeing that we nailed it
Strawberry Recoverite
Fructose Called Most Dangerous Sugar
Craig Weatherby
Corn syrup is Americans’ major dietary source; Findings add evidence to indictment of excess intake of all forms of sugar

This isn’t your usual story about the evils of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS).
Many observers have blamed America’s epidemic of diabetes and obesity on the rise in use of HFCS as a sweetener.
This sweetener-shift was driven by the rising cost of cane sugar (pure sucrose) to American manufacturers in recent decades, and the falling cost of heavily subsidized corn and corn byproducts like HFCS.
But there have always been under-reported problems with the HFCS hypothesis of obesity and diabetes.
For one thing, we’re seeing the same sorts of increases in diabetes and obesity in countries where the price of cane sugar is not artifcially high, and manufacturers of sweets and sodas never

switched from cane sugar to HFCS.
If HFCS is the villain, then people overseas who eat sucrose-sweetened candy and soda shouldn’t be getting fat and diabetic as fast as Americans are.
Two years ago, a University of Florida team proposed an intriguing hypothesis to explain why fructose is the most unhealthful form of sugar.
And there is just as much fructose in cane sugar as in HFCS, so this would explain why people who eat too much sugar in either form - HFCS or cane sugar (sucrose) - would become more prone to obesity and diabetes at about the same rate.
Both HFCS and cane sugar are one-half glucose and one-half fructose.
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Welcome : From the office of Brian Frank
Welcome to the 58th issue of Endurance News. Over the 16 years that we’ve been putting this publication out every 90 days, I’ve developed the habit of re-reading my column from the previous issue before starting the next. I like to make sure I don’t repeat myself unintentionally. However, after re-reading my January column, I won’t be able to avoid it. If you missed the January issue for some reason, it’s well worth the read. You can fnd it and download it for free, along with any or all of the previous 56 issues, by clicking on the Endurance News link on the left side navigation of our web site.
The January issue was our biggest issue at 56 pages; however, with this issue we’re raising that bar to 64 pages! We just have too much good content to give you any less. At the rate this publication is growing we’ll have to start calling it a magazine soon. That may not be a bad thing since our media universe is shrinking with the recent purchase of Inside Triathlon and Velo News by the same group that already owns Triathlete, Competitor, and all of the City Sports publications. Give me the good old days of Lew Kidder’s Triathlon Today and Ultrarunning before it went color!
Sorry, I digressed. In issue #57 we featured aspartame as our lead story and this issue headlines again with further evidence on the fructose epidemic that we are facing. To quote myself from the previous issue, “the articles you will fnd in this issue of Endurance News highlighting the dangers of high fructose corn syrup and artifcial sweeteners, the

safety, necessity, and effcacy of prudent supplementation and the success of athletes employing our ‘less is better’ fueling philosophies provide a rare alternative to what you typically read elsewhere. Endurance News, along with all of our other publications and web site, will continue to reinforce our positions on these important issues.” Ditto for this issue.
Moving on, I’m sure many of you are waiting to hear the whole story on this pesky lawsuit with the three athletes alleging their positive drug tests resulted from taking a few Endurolytes. Their allegations simply are not true. Believe me, I’d love nothing more than to tell you the whole story, but that’s going to have to wait for a future issue after this matter has run its legal course. In the meantime, I’ll quote our offcial response: “We trust that the media and the public will allow due process and the courts to deal with this matter before rushing to judgment. While we empathize with the challenges that these three athletes face by virtue of their positive drug tests, they are directing the blame for their situation in the wrong direction. We are certain that when all of the facts are presented in a court of law, Hammer Nutrition will be vindicated of any wrongdoing.”
Without refuting their allegations point by point, discrediting their supposed evidence, or giving this matter even more undeserved attention, I’d like to make a few general points. First, we live in the most litigious society in the world. What is true is that we have operated with the utmost integrity and transparency, while delivering the highest quality products for 21 years. These allegations do not change that and you should have no concern regarding the safety or effcacy of any products sold under my brand.
Hammer Cubes – DOA
We are constantly testing and working to develop new and innovative products. Hammer Gel is a refnement of the original energy gel called Leppin Squeezy (sorry GU, but you didn’t invent the energy gel). HEED is a refnement of you-know-what, etc. A couple of years ago one of our competitors came out with a carbohydrate block (like a big cube shaped gummy bear) that many of you said you liked as an alternative to the typical sports drink or energy gel. Many more asked when we’d be developing our own version.
The challenge for us was to develop such a cube that would have a carbohydrate profle consistent with our “low/no simple sugar” ethos. The products currently on the market deliver 50-100% of their carbohydrate calories from sugar and other variations in different shapes have between 50 and 100% sugar content. Our variation would have to be around 10% sugar. Well, we worked long and hard, recruiting the best food technologists from the largest supplier of maltodextrin in the world and one of the best university labs in the country. When given the design criteria, all were confdent of their success. After over one and a half years in the lab, a 90% complex carb gummy bear was declared impossible.
The bottom line is that you cannot make a jelly bean or gummy bear type product with less than 50% sugar content. Now don’t get me wrong, we made raspberry, apple-cinnamon, and espresso “cubes” that were delicious. We even had to hide them so that everyone in the offce didn’t eat them or take them home to their kids. However, the sugar content was almost 60%. So, rather than compromise my philosophy for commercial gain, we

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•      Cane sugar is pure sucrose: a compound consisting of one molecule each of glucose and fructose.
•      Most HFCS is 45-55 percent fructose, with the remainder being glucose.
One difference is that sucrose occurs naturally in cane syrup and most fruits, while the various forms of HFCS are synthetic combinations of fructose and glucose, none of which occur in nature.
Some argue that there is something about the structure of HFCS that makes its fructose worse than the fructose in sucrose, but so far, that hypothesis lacks evidence.
The Florida team proposes that sweets and sodas of all kinds are unhealthful because they contain high levels of either HFCS or cane sugar, hence equally large amounts of fructose.
Here’s the scoop on the evidence they presented, which should make us all leery of enjoying sweets or sweetened foods and drinks in more than very small amounts.
Florida team presents strong circumstantial case against fructose Our story starts in 2006, with publication of an article by the University of Florida researchers.
The Florida group noted that the rise in rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome over the past two decades coincided with a marked increase in American’s fructose intake (Johnson RJ et al. 2007).
While suggestive, this correlation cannot prove cause and effect. But then a group led by kidney specialist Richard Johnson, M.D., built a persuasive case consisting of three logical steps (Heinig M, Johnson RJ 2006):
1.) Unlike other sugars, fructose causes blood levels of uric acid to rise rapidly. 2.) Uric acid in the blood reduces levels of nitric oxide (NO), especially in the endothelial lining of our arteries ... so-called “endothelial NO”. 3.) NO enhances the effciency of insulin, increases blood fow to muscle, and enhances glucose uptake. 4.) Animals that lack endothelial NO develop insulin resistance and other features of metabolic syndrome: a cluster
of symptoms linked to increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
So, the Floridians proposed that the current epidemic of metabolic syndrome is due in part to fructose-induced rises in people’s blood levels of uric acid, which reduce endothelial NO levels and induce insulin resistance.
Their hypothesis is supported by the fact that, as they wrote, “... changes in average uric acid levels correlate with the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the US and developing countries.”
Researchers propose ranking foods on a “fructose index”
We’d not heard of the Florida team’s persuasive prosecution of fructose until we caught wind of their recent proposal to replace the popular glycemic index with a “fructose index”.
As you probably know, the glycemic index is used by diabetics to rank foods by the amount by which they raise blood sugar levels. (The words glycemic and glucose both come from the Greek word glukus, meaning “sweet”.)
The glycemic index (GI) is a scale used to rank carbohydrates based on their ability to raise blood glucose levels.
And the GI index has been popularized in bestsellers as a way for selecting foods to reduce the risk for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, all of which are linked to chronic high blood sugar and its evil result: the near-diabetic metabolic disorder known as “insulin resistance”, which is an increasing failure of our cells to react to the signals sent by insulin.
Diabetes is always preceded by insulin resistance, which is the failure of our cells to be sensitive to insulin, and therefore fail to absorb glucose from the blood as they should, thus worsening blood sugar control.
The Florida team noted that the GI scale is better at identifying foods that stimulate release of insulin (by spiking blood glucose levels) than it is at pinpointing foods that stimulate insulin resistance (Segal MS et al. 2007).
And interestingly, low-glycemic diets have not proven particularly good at promoting weight loss, which suggests
that they may not be as helpful at preventing diabetes as has been generally presumed.
The Floridians noted that the correlations observed between high GI diets on one hand and diabetes and cardiovascular disease on the other are related to high consumption of cane sugar or HFCS, because while both are one-half fructose, both also have high GI rankings due to their high glucose content.
Dr. Johnson’s research suggests that, compared with glucose content, the fructose contained in sugary foods is much more responsible for promoting diabetes and heart disease. (To be sure, excessive glucose consumption is not good, either.)
Last fall, their hypothesis led them to propose the use of a fructose index to categorize foods and to propose studies to determine the effectiveness of low fructose diets for reducing the risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
These matters are complex, and time will tell, but the folks in Florida make a pretty good case.
Key Points
Persuasive hypothesis assigns major
blame to fructose for rising obesity
and diabetes rates.
Problem seen as stemming from
excess intake of either corn syrup or
cane sugar.
Corn syrup and cane sugar share
equal amounts of fructose, and may
share equal blame for obesity and
diabetes.
Sources
*  Segal MS, Gollub E, Johnson RJ. Is the fructose index more relevant with regards to cardiovascular disease than the glycemic index? Eur J Nutr. 2007 Oct;46(7):406-17. Epub 2007 Sep 1.
* Johnson RJ, Segal MS, Sautin Y, Nakagawa T, Feig DI, Kang DH, Gersch MS, Benner S, Sánchez-Lozada LG. Potential role of sugar (fructose) in the epidemic of hypertension, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Oct;86(4):899-906. Review.
* Heinig M, Johnson RJ. Role of uric acid in hypertension, renal disease, and metabolic syndrome. Cleve Clin J Med. 2006 Dec;73(12):1059-64. Review.
Reprinted with permission from Craig Weatherby, Director of Online Marketing and Content for Vital Choice Wild Seafood & Organics, Inc. (www. vitalchoice.com)

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From the Saddle of Steve Born : From the office of Steve Born
Welcome to the spring edition of Endurance News! We’ve had a great winter here in Montana (best snow in a few years) but we’re defnitely jonesing for sunnier, warmer weather to arrive. Sure, we’ve been on the bikes for a little while, in between rain & snow showers, but it’ll be nice to get out on a ride and not have to wear darn near everything I own to keep warm.
Anyway, the 2008 season is defnitely upon us and we’re all looking forward to a great year, especially in regards to helping you get your supplement and fueling program dialed in so you can have higher quality and more enjoyable workouts, and better race results.
Travel, travel, and more travel!
This year started off with a bang travel-wise, and the trip I took with Brian and Dr. Bill to Italy was one I’ll never forget. Yeah, it was mostly work-related as we were learning about the intricacies of the Globus muscle stimulator units for several hours a day at the Globus headquarters. Still, even though we were fully immersed in these many hours of daily training, I have to admit that it was hard to call it “work”… it’s going to be a long time before I lose the weight gained from ALL THAT FOOD!
A couple weeks after returning I headed down to Phoenix, Arizona for the second time to attend the Hammer Nutrition-sponsored International Christian
Triathlon Network (ICTN) spring camp. It was a great time for me in so many ways: I got to see some friends from the previous year’s camp, I was able make some wonderful new friends, I got to ride my bike (without wearing winter gear!), I gave a couple fueling clinics, and I was able to have some real quality time with God, both alone and in fellowship with other Christians. I’m already looking forward to next year’s camp and want to thank everyone who attended and helped make my time there this year so enjoyable and memorable. Special thanks to Sandy & Phil Plentzas, Chris Anderson, Lincoln Murdoch, Brian Grasky, Stan Smith, and Don Campbell.
After Phoenix, I headed down to Sun Valley/Ketchum, Idaho, my stomping grounds from a few years back, for the Boulder Mountain Tour Nordic ski race. After having done the race in previous years, I really wanted to do it this year. However, with precious few kilometers under my belt, and with the knowledge of how diffcult the race can be still fresh in my mind (even after all these years!), I decided to just do the expo and clinic on Friday, then watch the race on Saturday. And I’m kind of glad I went that route because the conditions—both snow and air—were very harsh on race day, making an already diffcult race even more so. Thanks to my good friends Ted and Leila Angle for graciously having me at “The Angle Inn” again this year.
Two weeks later I attended the Quality Bicycle Products “Frostbike” Show in Bloomington, Minnesota. This is an annual trade show for the vendors whose products are distributed via QBP to the bicycle industry. It’s signifcantly smaller and less hectic than the annual Interbike Show that we attend every year, which is one of the reasons I enjoy
going there annually… I enjoy having more time (and less noise!) to talk with bike shop owners/employees. Thanks to Dave Tierney at QBP for his tireless help in getting my booth arranged and set up, and for coordinating my clinic.
By the time you read this I’ll have returned from an early-April trip to RallySport Health & Fitness in Boulder, Colorado, where I’ll have done a couple clinics. After that (as of this writing), I don’t have any travel planned until June so I think it’d be a good time to reintroduce myself to my bike!
Come June, however, it’s time to hit the road again and here is my tentative schedule:
* June 5, 6 – VikingMan Triathlon – Burley/Heyburn, Idaho
* June 13, 14, 15 – Battle at Midway Triathlon – Soldier Hollow Legacy Park, Midway, Utah
* June 27, 28, 29 – Pacifc Crest Triathlon – Sunriver, Oregon
* July 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 – Highline Hammer – Whitefsh, Montana
* July 18, 19, 20 (F, S, S) – ChelanMan Triathlon – Chelan, Washington
* August 29, 30, 31 (F, S, S) – City of Portland Triathlon - Portland, Oregon
* September 12, 13, 14 (F, S, S) – Grand Columbian Full/Half/Olympic Iron Triathlon – Grand Coulee, Washington
* September 24, 25, 26 – Interbike Trade Show – Las Vegas, Nevada
* October 17, 18 (F, S) – Land Rover Pumpkinman Triathlon/USAT Club Nationals/USAT Halfmax National Championship – Boulder City, Nevada
* November 6, 7, 8, 9 (T, F, S, S) – Silverman Half & Full Iron Triathlon – Henderson, Nevada
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This is, of course, subject to change but for now this is where I’ll be. If you happen to be attending any of these events please come by the Hammer Nutrition booth and say hi… I’d love to see you!
Why we use maltodextrin (complex carbs)
Here’s a couple of great questions I received recently via email from a new client: “I understand that maltodextrin more easily absorbs because of osmolality and all of that, 15% or thereabouts as opposed to the 8-9% for simple sugars. However, I haven’t quite seen whether, for an endurance athlete with long periods of time at threshold (cycling in my case, 85 - 90% of max HR), maltodextrin becomes available to muscles as quickly as simple sugars like glucose and the like. If it doesn’t, then why don’t so many other supplement companies use maltodextrin instead of the glucose, sucrose combination (I understand why fructose isn’t great, I think)? Sure, on a 3 or 4-hour ride with most pacing from zones 2 - 3, maltodextrin makes great sense, but if I’m dropping the hammer for fve minutes at a time every four minutes for an hour and a half or two and a half hours, is it still my best bet when I’m depleting those stores much more quickly and need to fll them more quickly?
Here was my reply to him:
I can only hazard a guess as to why companies use simple sugars such as glucose and sucrose, and one of my guesses is that those types of carbohydrates are very cheap commodities. It’s not that maltodextrin is a truly expensive carbohydrate source but compared to glucose and sucrose it is, especially the high quality one we use in the Hammer fuels. So one potential reason is cost. The other is that simple sugars like glucose and sucrose sweeten a product quite well, especially compared to maltodextrin, which is noticeably less sweet. Most athletes are conditioned to sweetness, at least to some degree, and expect that in a sports drink or gel. Simple sugars take care of that suffciently so that’s perhaps another reason why companies use them in their products.
However, for effcient digestion of maximal volume of calories, simple sugars come up signifcantly short compared to maltodextrin. That’s one of the primary benefts maltodextrins offer over simple sugars, which you alluded to in your email. As far as whether maltodextrin becomes available to muscles as quickly as simple sugars do, I have no doubt that it does. The main reason is because of its high Glycemic Index (GI) rating, which as you know, measures how fast a food is likely to raise your blood sugar. The maltodextrin we use in Hammer Gel and our other
which is the frst fuel the body recruits and uses when exercise begins. Therefore, if the body’s frst-used source of fuel is “complex” in nature, it can be assumed that the body can break it and endogenously supplied complex carbohydrates down with remarkable ease. If there is a difference favoring faster digestion/utilization of glucose over maltodextrin (though I don’t believe this to be true), it is so minute as to not be comparable, especially given the other “plusses” attributed to maltodextrin.
Our position is that for...
1) Volume of calories that can be easily digested and utilized for energy
2) Less-to-complete-absence of stomach issues
3) Rapidness of blood sugar elevation
4) Duration of consistent energy provided
... complex carbohydrates (maltodextrin) are unquestionably a better source of carbohydrates for athletes, even when your efforts are shorter in duration and/ or at higher heart rates.
Take home message: There is absolutely no reason to put refned sugar in your body, especially during exercise. There are already so many negative general health consequences associated with simple sugar consumption (see the article “113 Ways Sugar Can Ruin Your Health” on the Hammer web site). With that being the case, if refned sugar isn’t good for your general health, it just doesn’t make any sense to believe that it can enhance your athletic performance. Avoid simple sugars!
Special “shout out”
My “shout out” for this issue goes to my long-time friend Muffy Ritz of Ketchum, Idaho. Don’t let the name fool you, Muffy is one tough athlete, perhaps the toughest and best overall athlete I’ve ever known, male or female. Muffy’s accomplishments in a number of sports are too numerous to mention here but she’s probably best known for her three runner-up fnishes in the Race Across America, with one of those 2nd places coming in her frst RAAM in 1993 where she set the still-standing rookie record of 9 days, 16 hours, 29 seconds. Muffy’s fastest RAAM was in 1995 and her time of 9 days, 6 hours, 32 seconds is the second fastest time in RAAM history.
fuels has a GI rating of 130+, whereas glucose and sucrose have much lower ratings, 100 and 61 respectively. So with maltodextrin you’re actually going to have a faster elevation of blood sugar levels compared to glucose, sucrose, or any other simple sugar. What you don’t get, however, is the quick drop in blood sugar levels, which is common with glucose or sucrose.
Some suggest that since maltodextrin is many chains of glucose “hooked” together, it takes the body longer to break those chains down for conversion to glucose (which all carb sources eventually become in the body). However, it needs to be noted that the bonds that compose maltodextrin are very weak so they are readily broken apart.
Additionally, the amylose-amylopectin content of maltodextrin is very similar in chemistry to human stored glycogen,
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BCAA's : Bill Misner, Ph.D.
The International Society of Sports Nutrition’s position on protein and exercise concludes by stating, “Under certain circumstances, specifc amino acid supplements, such as branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), may improve exercise performance and recovery from exercise.” In my opinion, this position stance is long overdue. Published research shows that BCAAs (leucine, isoleucine and valine), support endurance performance, improve immune system reaction, and enhance recovery.
BCAAs are naturally occurring molecules that the body uses to build proteins. The term “branched chain” refers to the molecular structure of these particular amino acids. BCAAs, particularly leucine, have anabolic effects on protein metabolism by increasing the rate of protein synthesis and decreasing the rate of protein degradation in resting human muscle. During recovery from endurance exercise, BCAAs have also been found to have anabolic effects in human muscle.
These effects are likely to be mediated through changes in signaling pathways controlling protein synthesis. Physiologists often use BCAAs in various formulations to decrease central nervous system fatigue in athletes, and taking BCAAs during or prior to exercise may also delay exercise-induced fatigue. Consuming a BCAA-enriched energy gel or drink enhances endurance performance. BCAA administration results in enhanced endurance performance and an increase in blood ammonia during exercise. Hammer Nutrition endurance products (Hammer Gel, Sustained Energy, and Perpetuem) and recovery products (Recoverite and Hammer Whey) are BCAA-enriched. Consistent use of BCAA-enriched sources prior to, during, and after prolonged exercise may improve lean muscle mass gain, recovery, and performance.
Note: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) is a not-for-proft academic society dedicated solely to
sports nutrition. This article is not an ISSN endorsement of a specifc product.
References
Quoted by permission of the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition: International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: Protein and Exercise. Campbell B, Kreider R, Ziegenfuss T, La Bounty P, Roberts M, Burke D, Landis J, Lopez H, Antonio J; J Intl Soc Sports Nutr, 2007 4:8 (26 September 2007) [Abstract] [Provisional PDF], http://www.jissn.com/ content/4/1/8
Bassit RA., et al. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation and the immune response of long­distance athletes. Nutrition. 18(5):376-379, 2002. Blomstrad, E., et al. Infuence of ingesting a solution of branched-chain amino acids on perceived exertion during exercise. Acta Physiol Scand. 159(1):41-49, 1997.
Blomstrand, E., et al. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 136(1):269S-273S, 2006. Calders, P., et al. Pre-exercise branched-chain amino acid administration increases endurance performance in rats. Med Sci Sports Exer. 29(9):1182-1186, 1997.
Mandarin Orange and Lemon-Lime. If you’re like many of our clients and plow through a 32-serving/scoop container in record time, you’re going to love this larger size. At $44.95 per container, it’s a really good deal and you save money because you are, in essence, “buying in bulk.” Each scoop from a 32-serving/ scoop container costs about 62¢, whereas each scoop from an 80-serving/scoop container is about 56¢… if you’re a frequent user of HEED that’ll defnitely save you some money in the long haul.
As mentioned in the previous issue of EN, the 80-serving/scoop size will initially be offered in Mandarin Orange
and Lemon-Lime. Depending on popularity and demand, we may offer other favors of HEED in this size in the future.
Our phenomenal recovery drink, Recoverite—currently offered in the Subtle Citrus favor—is now available in an awesome Strawberry favor (it’s really good!). Both single serving packets and 32-serving/scoop containers are available in this great new favor.
Lastly, Hammer Whey—Hammer Nutrition’s 100% whey protein isolate product—is now available in two light and delicious new favors: vanilla and
chai. The original unfavored Hammer Whey is still THE product to use when you want to make your own protein drinks/smoothies using Hammer Gel, HEED, fresh fruit, or organic fruit juices. However, if you prefer a little favor in your protein but want to skip the step of adding a favor component, the new vanilla and chai favors will ft the bill nicely. As is the case with the original Hammer Whey, the new favors will also contain 6 grams of glutamine per scoop.
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Muffy’s had several injury-related setbacks but they’ve only been temporary and at haven’t stopped her from competing at the highest level. Most recently, she competed in the Masters World Cup Nordic Championships in McCall, Idaho (February 28-March 7), skiing in the Women’s 50 – 54 age group. Against top skiers from around the world (including the always-tough Russians), Muffy’s results were more than outstanding:
* March 2, 2008 – 15km freestyle (a.k.a. “skating”) - 2nd place out of 39 skiers in a time of 43:24.8, which was a mere 18.7 seconds out of 1st place (Tatiana Esipova – RUS), and nearly 2 full minutes ahead of 3rd place.
* March 3, 2008 – 10km classic (a.k.a. “traditional”) - 2nd place out of 39 skiers in a time of 33:42.5, which was 45.3 seconds behind 1st place (Raufa Zagidulina - RUS), and over 1.5 minutes ahead of 3rd place.
* March 5, 2008 – 4 x 5km relay (second leg) – 2nd place, less than a minute behind the Russian team, and nearly 4 minutes ahead of the 3rd place Canadian team.
In 1997 Muffy founded the VAMPS Nordic program in Ketchum, where she and her coaches (one of whom is Hammer sponsored adventure racer extraordinaire Rebecca Rusch) teach women of all abilities how to cross country ski and become better skiers. She started with a handful of students, and a decade later the VAMPS has well over 150 members. Muffy not only uses many of the Hammer Nutrition products in her training and racing, she and her coaches continue to promote them to all the members of the VAMPS (thanks for that!).
So a special “shout out” and congratulations to you, Muffy, on your most recent accomplishments, and for your help in promoting the Hammer products to your athletes.
Eight years and counting
This issue of EN marks my 8th anniversary with Hammer Nutrition and it’s been an incredibly fulflling experience, one I plan on continuing for a long time to come. I’m not sure how
many people realize this but I’ve known
company owner Brian Frank long, long
before I ever started working for him in
2000, though I didn’t actually meet him
until I started working at the company.
He is, of course, my employer and I have
complete respect for him as the owner
of the company. On
the other hand, he
and I have been such
good friends for so
long that it’s hard for
me to think of him as
“The Boss,” at least
in the purest sense
of the term. Without
sounding boastful,
which is absolutely
not my intention, as a
result of our mutual
respect for each other
and our rock-solid
friendship, I think we make a pretty
good team.
I started using Hammer products (then known as E-CAPS) in 1990 and one of the reasons I became a client was because I was so impressed by the amount of time Brian spent with me on the phone helping me (remember that this was before email). No one at any other supplement company really gave me the time of day but here was someone who was genuinely interested in my athletic career and how I could improve my performance via supplementation… I was defnitely impressed and that’s never changed. Brian may not have invented customer service but he’s certainly made perfecting it a priority and he’s defnitely excelled at it. One of the reasons why I enjoy working here so much is because providing the best possible service is a priority for me as well. Treat others the same way you want to be treated – what a simple concept, yet so lacking in many businesses today. Not so with Hammer Nutrition.
Knowing Brian for as long as I have has allowed me to experience some unique things in the world of fueling. For starters, I was one of the frst people to ever try Hammer Gel and I vividly remember the all-white pouches containing this new fuel (chocolate and vanilla, the frst favors of Hammer Gel) that Brian shipped to my house. I tried them; I loved them… it was as simple as that. In fact, I dug this new energy gel prototype so much that I kept calling Brian and bugging him to send me more. Needless to say, I’ve been a MAJOR
Hammer Gel fan ever since.
I also remember when Brian sent me a container of this new, yet-to-be-named fuel (which was eventually called Energy Surge, then Sustained Energy). I distinctly remember him telling me on the phone that this stuff was pretty different because it was unfavored, and to give it a thorough test before discounting or rejecting it. With some reservations, as well as a couple mixed bottles of this new fuel in my bike bottle cages, I took off on a fairly lengthy training ride, which consisted of multiple loops on some pretty mountainous terrain near my house in Topanga, California. The frst couple of drinks I took I thought, “What the… what is this stuff?” because I was just not used to an unfavored fuel. However, the longer my ride went I noticed just how great this fuel was working. When it was over I realized I just completed one of the best workouts I ever had so I immediately called Brian to procure more of this bland-but-beautiful fuel. I’ve been a fan of the product ever since.
Several years later, after successfully completing the frst (and still only) Double Furnace Creek 508, fueled primarily on a new and not-yet-released fuel called Perpetuem, Brian was the frst person I called. Yeah, it was nearly 1:00 a.m. PST when I called him (2:00 a.m. Montana time) but I didn’t care. I just had to tell him that (A) I had fnished the record attempt successfully, and (B) “This fuel worked so friggin’ well, man; it was just awesome. We’ve got to get it into the product line!” That was in October 2002 and we had Perpetuem in the product line by early 2003.
There are so many other stories and experiences I could share but time and space limits me from even scratching the surface of possibilities. I’ll just end by saying that it’s been a great and satisfying experience so far, and if the next eight years are anywhere near as rewarding as the frst eight, I’m a lucky man indeed.
I hope that 2008 has been a good one for you so far!
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Product Spotlight : Mito Caps : Steve Born
Of the 19 products that currently make up the Hammer Nutrition supplement line, three are designated as not only essential, but Daily Essentials: Premium Insurance Caps, Race Caps Supreme, and Mito Caps. The reason for this special designation is because we believe:
•      These three products provide the widest range of benefts for both athletic performance and overall health.
•      The benefcial effects of these products are cumulative, meaning the more consistently you take them (ideally daily) the more you beneft.
This month’s “Spotlight” product is Mito Caps, the third (but certainly not least) in the Daily Essentials category. While all the products in the Hammer Nutrition line defnitely have value, providing specifc benefts and fulflling specifc needs, I personally believe Mito Caps is the most important product Hammer Nutrition has ever produced for promoting enhanced athletic performance and overall health. Here’s my rationale:
Sometimes it seems as though many of science’s discoveries aren’t really applicable for you or me, at least in terms of offering benefts for both general health and athletic performance. Every once in a while, a tidbit of promising scientifc research comes through, which creates a spark of interest. And then, every once in a blue moon (pardon the cliché) a study’s results are so profound in their scope that it literally can, and should, change how athletes—all humans actually—perceive nutritional science and nutritional supplements. I can honestly say that in all the time
I’ve studied supplementation, nothing has ever gotten me so excited as the remarkable discoveries made by Dr. Bruce Ames and his scientifc associates regarding the issue of mitochondrial aging and regeneration.
The whole amazing story of mitochondrial function could go on for pages, but let’s simplify the matter to a few relevant points:
•      Mitochondria, the energy producing organelles, make ATP from food molecules (sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids) and oxygen.
•      Energy production also creates free radicals, which damage mitochondrial DNA.
•      Mitochondrial function decreases and free radical production increases with age. This “double whammy” contributes to the aging process, an ongoing, continuous cycle of decreased mitochondrial functioning, increased free radical production, and damaged mitochondrial DNA.
•      The resulting decay in mitochondrial functioning, along with increased production and accumulation of free radicals, has obvious negative effects on athletic performance. The body’s ability to make energy decreases while free radicals increase.
•      Even more importantly, mitochondrial aging and decreased function results in health decline and disease processes affecting the heart and brain. To quote one well-known researcher, “Oxidative mitochondrial decay is a major contributor to aging.”
That’s why athletes should be particularly interested in maintaining the optimal functionality of the mitochondria. We want to maintain high quality, consistent energy production, while also protecting against the deterioration of mitochondrial function. The key question is, “What can we do to make this a reality?”
Dr. Ames and the other researchers found two nutrients—acetyl l-carnitine (ALC) and r-alpha lipoic acid (r-ALA)— signifcantly and positively infuenced mitochondrial function in mice. In fact, when Ames and his researchers fed older rats these two nutrients the results surprised even them. Not only did the older rats perform better on memory tests, they had more vigor, and the mitochondria in the cells worked better. Dr. Ames is even quoted as saying, “With the two supplements together, these old rats got up and did the Macarena.” He went on to say, “The brain looks better, they are full of energy – everything we looked at looks more like a young animal.” Another researcher commented, “The animals seem to have much more vigor than animals not on this diet, signaling massive improvement to these animals’ health and well being.”
The crux of these studies (and yes, this is in very basic terms) is that the combination of these two nutrients “tunes up” the mitochondria. Tuning up human metabolism is likely a major way to minimize DNA damage, improve health (not to mention athletic performance), and prolong a healthy lifespan. Ames’ studies found that ALC and r-ALA performed this “tune up” by improving mitochondria activity and cellular metabolism.

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Dr. Bill Misner emphasizes the importance of this by stating, “So few substrate molecules function biochemically inside mitochondria cells. Endurance athletes should realize how incredibly important it is to effect mitochondria… the longer you can stimulate the lifespan or health of the mitochondria, the longer you will live and the better you will perform in endurance events. The athlete who has the most healthy/effcient active mitochondria is the athlete who performs at their best.”
That’s why Mito Caps was produced and why I consider it to arguably be the most important product in the Hammer Nutrition line.
The unique & potent Mito Caps formula
Mito Caps incorporates the same nutrients used in Ames’ studies, and more…
Acetyl l-carnitine (ALC)
L-Carnitine is a derivative of the amino acid lysine, and is synthesized in the body by fve different enzymes involving the amino acids lysine and methione, iron, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and the reduced form of niacin (NAD). Small amounts—roughly 10-50 mg—of l-carnitine are synthesized daily, which is adequate for preventing defciency problems. However, these amounts are most likely insuffcient for athletes. One nutritional scientist writes, “Although the body makes l-carnitine, it may not make an optimum amount for athletes, because muscle carnitine levels are rapidly depleted even during moderate exercise.”
This would make supplemental l-carnitine essential for endurance athletes. Acetyl l-carnitine (ALC) is arguably the premier form of this nutrient for two reasons:
1.) It provides l-carnitine, which is the key nutrient involved in shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondria for energy production.
2.) It also provides acetyl groups, which may be used in the formation of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, which is involved in cognitive function.
In addition to its crucial role in how the body uses fatty acids for fuels, l-carnitine directly impacts energy production and the health of the mitochondria in other ways…
It is believed that the performance of
the mitochondria to produce energy is
largely dependent
upon the
composition and
functionality of the
lipids that make up
the mitochondrial
membrane. It is
also believed that
the decrease in
cellular energy
production that
comes from the
aging process is
at least partially
due to the
alteration of the
lipid composition
and content of
the mitochondrial
membranes. There
are a variety of
phospholipids that
are biosynthesized
and make up
the membrane of the mitochondria;
cardiolipin is one of them and when
scientists studied the membrane
makeup of old rats versus young rats
they found no signifcant changes in the
other phospholipids, but they did see a
one-third decline in the concentration of
cardiolipin.
The signifcance of this is that the optimal activity of cytochrome c oxidase, which is a key enzyme complex in mitochondrial energy production (via the oxidative phosphorylation, a.k.a. electron transport chain cycle), is dependent on adequate levels of cardiolipin. When researchers gave the rats doses of acetyl l-carnitine they found an increase in cardiolipin levels and that the activity of the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme system was restored to that of the younger rats.
Scientists also discovered that the activity of another enzyme – adenine nucleotide tanslocase (ANT) – also decreases with age. ANT is a carrier protein that exchanges Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) for Adenosine Disphosphate (ADP) across the inner mitochondrial membrane from inside
the mitochondria to the cytosol (outside of the mitochondria, but inside the cell). When ANT activity decreases it results in reduced ATP available for cellular energy production. When the aged rats where fed acetyl l-carnitine, the activity of ANT was increased and thus energy production was increased.
Acetyl l-carnitine (ALC) also boosts the activity of the enzyme carnitine acetyltransferase, which plays a vital role in mitochondria fuel burning and energy production. ALC also boosts neurological functioning, which would support concentration and mental focus (a major beneft for ultra-endurance events). ALC is also believed to help preserve lean muscle tissue by decreasing excess levels of cortisol. Lastly, ALC seems to reduce the depletion of ATP by forming acetyl-CoA, which one nutritional expert calls, “the most important intermediary in the generation of energy from amino acids, fats, and carbohydrates.”
R-alpha lipoic acid (r-ALA or R-ALA)
R-ALA is intimately involved in the complex process of energy production. It is an essential cofactor for several multi-enzyme complexes (primarily the dehydrogenase complexes) that catalyze (increase the speed of a chemical reaction) critical energy metabolism reactions inside the mitochondria. It’s safe to say that the combination of r-ALA and acetyl l-carnitine dynamically infuences energy production.
However, energy production, especially increased energy production, comes at a cost: more free radical production. Fortunately, the body has a variety of antioxidant mechanisms that counteract and neutralize the negative effects of free radicals. Increased energy production, as well as longer-term high level energy production (think endurance athletes) increases the volume of free
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radicals that are produced, which can easily overwhelm the body’s built-in antioxidant defenses. This is the reason why consumption of a variety of antioxidants is recommended and perhaps none are stronger or provide a wider range of benefts than r-alpha lipoic acid. R-ALA is commonly known as the “universal antioxidant” because it functions as both a water- and fat-soluble antioxidant with the ability to neutralize several different types of free radicals, perhaps more than any other antioxidant known to man.
In addition, a portion of r-ALA is reduced to a substance called Alpha-dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), which functions directly as an antioxidant, helping to neutralize reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen oxygen species (NOS) free radicals.
Just as impressive as its antioxidant capabilities is DHLA’s ability to help to regenerate “used up” or oxidized antioxidants such as vitamins C & E, CoQ10, and glutathione. One nutritional scientist wrote, “When an antioxidant like vitamin C neutralizes a free radical, it becomes oxidized itself, and is not able to neutralize other free radicals until it has been reduced or regenerated. DHLA is a potent reducing agent, and has the capacity to regenerate a number of oxidized antioxidants to their active antioxidant forms. DHLA can be regenerated from alpha-lipoic acid through the activity of enzymes present in cells.”
So by taking r-ALA energy production is optimized (especially when combined with acetyl l-carnitine) and the enormous amounts of free radicals produced from mitochondrial energy production are effectively neutralized, via r-ALA itself and the other antioxidants it regenerates.
R-ALA also binds with excess free metal ions such as iron and copper, both of which can trigger a number of reactions that generate free radicals. R-alpha lipoic acid chelates (binds) with these ions in a way that prevents them from generating free radicals.
As mentioned earlier, r-ALA is involved in the regeneration of glutathione, which is arguably the most important
antioxidant we have in our bodies. In addition to regenerating oxidized glutahione, R-ALA has been found to increase intercellular glutathione levels by increasing the uptake of cysteine by cells.
Lastly, r-ALA is also believed to be involved in maintaining proper glucose metabolism by improving insulin sensitivity.
Note that many alpha lipoic acid supplements available today are a 50/50 mixture of two forms: the “R” form, which is the natural form, and the “S” form, which is synthetic. The “S” form of alpha lipoic acid, which is reduced in the cytoplasm, is inactive. The “R” form, the natural coenzyme, which is reduced in the mitochondria, is active. In other words, the r-lipoic isomer is the only active form in mitochondria cells. It was once thought that synthetic alpha-lipoic acid, which contains both s- & r-isomers, would work within human cellular straits, but research showed that at mitochondria cell level only the r- form made it though… if the s- form was NOT present to inhibit its transition. This means the synthetic form of alpha-lipoic acid has NO effects inside mitochondria cells (it may actually have inhibiting effects that are potentially derogatory), in spite of half of it being composed of r-alpha lipoic acid.
DMAE and PABA
Dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) is a naturally occurring nutrient found in fsh. It stimulates the production of choline, which in turn allows the brain to optimize production of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in learning and memory. DMAE has been reported to inhibit the formation of the pigment lipofuscin, which is formed by the ineffcient metabolism of fatty acids. Lipofuscin accumulates with age in all body tissues; in the skin it appears as liver spots. DMAE not only prevents the formation of lipofuscin, but also has been observed to remove liver spots completely. This may be equated with internal removal of aging cells by long-term supplementation with DMAE. One study evaluated the life extension effect of DMAE on old mice. Oral DMAE administration in the drinking water resulted in a reduced mortality rate and an increase in both mean and maximum survival time in rats.
Para-amino benzoic acid (PABA) is a B-complex vitamin that acts in a structural role with folic acid and also functions in the formation of red blood cells. It is also a potent neutralizer of singlet molecular oxygen, a free radical that is a common by-product of metabolism. PABA’s free radical neutralization is a most powerful effect because it retards collagen cross-linking, promotes fexibility, and promotes healthy cell structures and membranes. Glycosylation (or glycation) is a process where glucose molecules attach themselves to proteins, eventually resulting in protein binding, or cross-linking, which alters their biological and structural roles. Cross-links, also known as advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs), have been linked to the loss of fexibility and deterioration of connective tissue associated with aging.
All that said, the primary reason why DMAE and PABA exist in the product is to amplify and potentiate the ALC and r-ALA components. The amounts of the latter two used in Ames’ studies are extremely high and supplementation with those amounts is not only impractical but would be unbelievably expensive. DMAE and PABA are a nutrient substitute for the anti-aging “drug” GH-3 and mimic its effects (providing substantial benefts of their own). Dr. Misner writes, “By adding essentially what is a GH-3 formula, the resulting effects of ALC and r-ALA are remarkably multiplied.” In other words, thanks to the effects of DMAE and PABA less ALC and r-ALA are required to achieve noticeable benefts.
Vitamin E & Vitamin B6
Vitamin E is a well-known fat-soluble antioxidant, which is one of the reasons for its inclusion in the Mito Caps formula. However, the primary reason that both vitamin E and vitamin B6 are in the product is because, in the words of Dr. Misner, “In order for the GH-3 like effect to be secure, these two nutrients must be present and available.” Put another way, for DMAE and PABA to yield their benefts, adequate amounts of both vitamin E and vitamin B6 are necessary.
Ascorbyl palmitate
We all know the antioxidant benefts of vitamin C, the most common form of this vitamin being ascorbic acid. In
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addition to its many benefts, vitamin C enhances the bioavailability of carnitine, which results in greater fat utilization capabilities. Vitamin C is also available in a variety of other forms – one is ascorbic acid chemically bonded (chelated) to specifc minerals such as calcium (calcium ascorbate). Another form is the fat-soluble form known as ascorbyl palmitate.
Ascorbyl palmitate is a synthetic and non-acidic form of vitamin C that, due to its lipid (fat)-soluble nature, has the ability to reach specifc areas of tissue that ascorbic acid—an acidic, water-soluble form of the vitamin—cannot. In other words, ascorbyl palmitate and ascorbic acid work in entirely separate areas of the body and only ascorbyl palmitate—the fat-soluble form of vitamin C—is benefcial for aiding in the prevention of peroxidation of the lipid areas of the body.
Summary
It would be hard, if not impossible, to fnd any product that contains a variety of nutrients that have so many benefts, both singularly and synergistically.
No other product, in my opinion, has so many benefts that apply to both enhanced athletic performance and overall health. That’s why I consider Mito Caps to be such an important product, one that every person—athlete and non-athlete—should take every day for life. To reiterate and expand on Dr. Misner’s earlier statement:
“Mito Caps product is a plausible and safe supplemental intervention that may reduce mitochondria substrate depletion imposed by age and endurance exercise stress. I have taken these substrates without any known side effects… except less fatigue, better endurance performance, and less required sleep. So few substrate molecules function biochemically inside mitochondria cells. Endurance athletes should realize how incredibly important it is to effect mitochondria and that everything formulated in this compound infuences mitochondria cell biochemistry function synergistically and remarkably. Mito Caps is a product that I recommend taken year-round.”
Hammer Gel Now Available in 255
Flavors!              David Levin
Are you thinking that maybe Hammer added Spearmint, Parmesan, Olive Oil & Garlic, Nutmeg, and a couple hundred more favors while you were downstairs on the trainer? No new favors (yet), but did you know that there are 255 possible favor combinations of Hammer Gel? That’s the number of mathematically possible combinations using anywhere from just one to all eight favors (I’m not going into the philosophical argument of whether “unfavored” is in fact a favor; I’m ignoring it here.) And that fgure is just combinations, not counting proportions of each favor.
Of course, only a fraction of these combinations are practical, but that still leaves plenty of new options. If you haven’t used/tested any Hammer Gel customized cuisine, you’re missing some variety, good favors, and little fun, too. Some recommended combos include: orange/vanilla, banana/tropical, banana/ orange/tropical, vanilla/raspberry, chocolate/espresso, and chocolate/ raspberry.
You can mix these fully by leaving a little head space in the hammer fask and shaking vigorously. You can also layer them and have two or three favors in one fask, at least for a while.
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Shopping Spree : Jim Bruskewitz
I’m shopping for some more ftness. I have some races that are getting ever closer and I don’t want to wait until the last minute to get what I need to meet the challenge. I know I want to feel better while going faster and I’d like to ride that feeling out as long as I can. On my shopping list I have some specifc training tools that I’m looking for, and I want to get the best I can fnd for the time I’m willing to spend. There’s some training I’d like to avoid. In general, I’m really not interested in just throwing a bunch of miles at my body unless I know I’ll get the desired results, and I certainly don’t want to just replicate what others are doing if for no other reason than I see a bunch of people trying really hard and not getting what they want.
On my list I have specifc training items that when assembled should give me all the parts I need to build my body into a lean mean machine. I like the sound of that. I’m planning races that last anywhere from 2 plus to 9+, well maybe 9++++ hours to fnish. I think I can get a lot of utility out of the training items I’m looking for because most of them will help me with all of the distances I plan to race.
Time to check my shopping list to make sure I’m not missing anything. I’d really like a training tool to help me burn fat (fatty acids) because I know that I’ll rely on this fuel source to greater degrees the longer the race that I’ll be doing. I know I’ll make good use of this item because it will be the primary fuel source I’ll need when I’m recovering from my workouts too. I can’t forget that if I pick this tool wisely, I’ll be able to spare other fuel sources at paces up to my anaerobic threshold (AT) and hold a faster AT pace to boot. This tool
will also help me increase the blood perfusion to my muscles and will be great for aerobic work. I’ll also increase the number and size of my mitochondria where the enzymes needed to deliver energy aerobically reside. With all these benefts, it is no wonder that this is the frst item on my list of “must haves”.
I want something that will push my anaerobic threshold to a higher pace. This will be an attachment to the tool I previously mentioned and will force me to rely more on glucose (stored as glycogen in the muscle) as a fuel source. I will be able to store more glycogen in my muscles after training at my anaerobic threshold. I’d like this item to be able to help me shuttle lactic acid back to something I can burn using the frst item on my list. That way I won’t be building up the lactic acid in my muscles, causing problems that will compromise my ability to sustain an effort. This item should get me accustomed to a pace that I will use during the 1/2 Ironman races lasting 4 to 5+ hours that I have planned.
Next, I defnitely want a tool, that when used sparingly, will improve my pace at the shortest races I’ll do, those lasting 2+ hours. The beauty of this item is its utility. I want to be able to improve everything, my fat burning abilities, my ability to burn fatty acids and glucose both at elevated rates. And this item will tax my cardio-pulmonary capabilities to a greater degree, improve my ability to buffer the lactic acid I am producing, and make me accustomed to both the speed and level of discomfort that comes with sustaining this effort for up to an hour in a given discipline.
I can certainly use a tool that will help me recruit more muscle when I am
training and racing. The more muscle I have available at any moment in time, the more muscle mass that can be spared at any moment when holding a steady workload. Also, for those times when I have to produce a lot of force in a short period, like hills and transitions or anytime I’m accelerating, I’d like to fnd a tool that will improve my ability to do these things.
The last item I’m looking for will improve my ability to work at my aerobic capacity (VO2 max). I will get quite a few extras with this item, like it or not. Everything I am looking for is being trained with this item but utility comes with a price. The high levels of lactic acid produced will require extra recovery time. I’ll get practice at delivering energy anaerobically above my AT. My cardio-pulmonary system will be further taxed. Since I will never spend anything more than brief moments at this intensity while racing and the amount of recovery will keep me from training as much in its wake, I will not need much of this item.
I think I have a reasonable list. I’m headed to the ftness market to see what I can fnd. I’ll match the label’s contents with my shopping list and use the directions for use to guide me through my workouts. Here’s what I’m putting in my shopping cart.
Product: Endurance – going, going, and going
Contents: Increase in the number and size of mitochondria-increase amount of capillarization (blood supply to muscles)-increased ability to burn fatty acids-increased muscle glycogen stores
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PSA Caps : Bill Misner, Ph.D. & Steve Born
Q: I notice you have both Beta-sitosterol and Saw Palmetto Extract in PSA Caps. Isn’t that redundant? Also, have you considered adding pumpkin seeds?
A: After reviewing most of the products sold commercially from reputable manufacturers, the PSA Caps formula is unique due to signifcant effects in both water-soluble and fatty acid-soluble entry metabolism.
Beta-sitosterol increases Interleukin 2 (IL-2) and Interferon Gamma production by stimulating the proliferation of TH1 Helper T-Cells and deactivating TH2 Helper T-Cells. One of the problems with generating potency with Beta-sitosterols is absorption, since 95% of it may be metabolized prior to productive effects upon the prostate. If Beta-sitosterol is poorly absorbed at 5%, then raising concentration levels will be effectual when in the presence of other specifc ingredients such as steroidal saponins and Urtica dioica root extract (Stinging Nettle, a.k.a. Nettle). When Beta-sitosterol is formulated in combination with other Phytosterols or Sterolins such as the Steroidal Saponins (Beta-sitosterol & Stigmasterol) like those found in Saw Palmetto with triterpene fractions (Cycloartenol, Lupeol, Lupenone, and 24-methyl-Cycloartenol), they potentiate (increase the effectiveness of) each other. Stinging Nettle is the most effective adjunct to Saw Palmetto and Beta-sitosterol for the treatment of prostate health. Nettle and extra amounts of Beta-sitosterol concentrate, including a fractional amount in Saw Palmetto, are formulated into PSA Caps to raise these potent effects both by quality and quantity.
Oral tribulus terrestris increases plasma
testosterone levels in animal studies. But when I convert dosage necessary to human standards, you are looking at 750-1000 mg per day. That would be at least [the amount necessary to fll] a -00- capsule in addition to PSA Caps, with the string that elevating testosterone in a prostate issue may not be the best idea… normal health yes, but all persons, no. Horny Goat Weed’s (Epimedium) effectual doses also raise testosterone [at about] 500-1500 mg per day. It raises the same questions that Tribulus raises and may ft into the normal healthy male prostate supplement protocol, but not in those who are experiencing growth or cancer issues in their prostate.
Pumpkin seeds are “reported” to reduce male dribble urinary incontinence. The evidence for this statement is only supported by anecdotal hearsay. When I reviewed the contents of pumpkin seeds or seed oils, I found a signifcant amount of Omega-6 and Omega-9 fatty acids, and a signifcant amount of phosphorous and potassium. The other micronutritient levels that may infuence prostate health are in pumpkin seeds, but not in the concentrated amount needed to affect prostate health unless very large amounts were consumed.
Pumpkin seeds (milligram substance per 100 grams seeds)
Amino Acids: 24,540 Carbohydrates: 17,810 Fiber: 3,900 Simple Sugars: 1,000
Carotenoids:
* Beta-carotene – 228 mcg
Lignans:
* Secoisolariciresinol
* Lariciresinol
Lipids:
* Omega-3 – 181
* Omega-6 – 20,720
* Linoleic Acid – 20,720
Monounsaturated:
* Palmitoleic Acid -- 99
* Oleic Acid -- 14,146
Saturated:
* Lauric Acid – 44
* Myristic Acid – 52
* Palmitic Acid – 5,612
* Stearic Acid – 2,811
Phytosterols:
* Beta-Sitosterol 13
Minerals:
* Potassium – 807
* Phosphorus – 1,174
* Zinc – 7.46
* Calcium – 43
* Iron – 14.97
* Sodium – 18
* Copper – 1.387
* Manganese – 3.021
* Selenium – 5.6 mcg
Vitamins:
* Vitamin C – 1.9
* Vitamin B1 – 0.21
* Vitamin B2 – 0.32
* Vitamin B3 – 1.745
* Vitamin B5 – 0.339
* Vitamin B6 – 0.224
* Folic Acid – 58 mcg
* Gamma-Tocopherol – 19.07
* Vitamin K – 51.4 mcg
The PSA Caps Formula
Beta-sitosterol – This plant sterol
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Alternatives for neck and back pain : Steve Born
In a study involving 250 patients diagnosed by a neurosurgeon with non-surgical neck or back pain, daily supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids was found to signifcantly alleviate pain and reduce the need for prescription NSAID (non-steroidal anti-infammatory) medications. At the start of the study, all subjects were taking prescription NSAID medication. Subjects were asked to take daily fsh oil supplements totaling 2,400 mg/day omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) for the frst two weeks. They were then asked to cut the dose in half, to 1,200 mg/day.
Results from questionnaires flled out by half of the subjects (125) after an average of 75 days on fsh oil reported signifcant improvements in pain, as compared with prior to fsh oil supplementation. Most of the subjects (78%) took 1,200 mg/
day; the remaining 22% took 2,400 mg/ day. Over half (60%) of subjects reported improvements in overall pain and in joint pain; 59% reported discontinuing their NSAID medications; 80% reported satisfaction with their improvement; and 88% reported that they would continue taking the fsh oil supplement. No signifcant side effects were reported.
Although the study was not placebo-controlled, these results suggest the safety and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of non-surgical neck or back pain. The authors point out that their fndings mirror the results from other controlled trials that have showed the effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acids as compared to ibuprofen for the treatment of arthritic pain. Given the prevalence of discogenic pain, such as back and neck pain, and the side effects and complications associated
with the use of NSAIDs (such as gastric ulcers and myocardial infarction), these fndings are promising, and warrant appropriately designed studies to further investigate the potential of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of non-surgical neck and back pain.
References
“Omega-3 fatty acids (fsh oil) as an anti-infammatory: an alternative to nonsteroidal anti-infammatory drugs for discogenic pain,” Maroon JC, Bost JW, Surg Neurol, 2006; 65(4): 326-31.
Note: Hammer Nutrition carries two sizes of the super high quality Carlson Norwegian Salmon Oil.
Real Athletes, Real Results!
“I can only report my results, but after taking motrin 800mg daily for years, my wife tried the Tissue Rejuvenator to see if it worked and it has! She is off the motrin completely, taking 2-4 Tissue Rejuvenator caps a day.” - Jeff T.
Read more about Tissue Rejuvenator on page 27
HOT TIPS : Recover right an dreap the benefits
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inhibits 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to harmful dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and aromatase, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to unwanted harmful estrogens (estradiol and estrone), elevated levels of which are an underlying cause of enlarged prostate. Beta-sitosterol has been reported to reduce BPH-related symptoms, including cancer growths in the prostate gland. Beta-sitosterol has been demonstrated to improve urine fow velocity in men with enlarged prostate, while also providing anti-infammatory effects in prostate tissue, which helps reduce BPH symptoms, enlarged prostate, and potential cancer cell mutations.
Saw Palmetto Extract (Seronoa repens) – The extract from this plant (a creeping palm with a trunk that lies on or just below the ground surface) is arguably the most frequently used herbal treatment for prostate problems, with several research studies demonstrating that a 45-90 day treatment for enlarged prostate leads to a signifcant clinical improvement. Saw Palmetto (320 mg per day) inhibits 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), reducing DHT by 66% in the periurethral region of the prostate gland, and by 50% in the prostate gland. Saw Palmetto also reduces epidermal growth factor (EGF). Men using Saw Palmetto for the treatment of enlarged prostate
generally begin to notice relief from their symptoms within the frst 30 days of use.
Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica root extract 4:1) – The active ingredient in this herb-like shrub inhibits the ability of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to bind to its receptors in the prostate and to subsequently stimulate the growth of prostate tissue (a key underlying factor in the progression of enlarged prostate). Other uses for Stinging nettle include treatment for urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and hay fever.
Epilobium (small fower willow) – Epilobium contains two polyphenols (Oenothein A, Oenothein B), which inhibit the 5-alpha reductase enzyme conversion of testosterone to DHT. Epilobium also inhibits aromatase from converting testosterone to estrogens, which happens in older males as they age, helping to reduce harmful DHT, estradiol, and estrone levels, which are known to contribute to prostate-related disorders. Epilobium also inhibits two types of prostaglandin 2’s (especially E-2), which have undesirable pro-infammatory effects.
Lycopene – This member of the carotenoid family (it produces the red/ reddish color in tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava & papaya) is a powerful antioxidant that protects the Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) content of lymphocytes (cells found in the blood, lymph, and lymphoid tissues) from oxidative damage. It interferes with the
ability of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF) to stimulate the proliferation of various types of cancers in the breast, endometrial, and prostate tissue. Research reports that endurance cyclists suffer from prostate disorders, erectile dysfunction, reduced sperm motility, and reduced sperm counts. Using 50 volunteers with low active sperm counts, researchers gave subjects 8 mg/d of lycopene during this one-year study; 35 patients experienced an improvement in sperm count, and 30 had improved functional sperm concentrations. There was a 36% pregnancy rate among the participants’ partners by the end of the study.
Alanine, Glutamic Acid, Glycine
– These amino acids, when taken for 14 days or more, minimized the symptoms of enlarged prostate. In order to positively affect/infuence several hormonal pathways involving prostate health, these particular amino acids should be consumed 60+ minutes before other amino acids (or protein-containing foods) are consumed.
Dr. Misner’s suggested use
To maximize the effect of PSA Caps, take 2 in the AM on an empty stomach then 2 on an empty stomach 1-2 hours before bedtime. After 6 weeks of taking this protocol, see your healthcare physician (urologist is recommended) for a PSA blood lab and physical prostate exam to determine BPH status.
Directions for use: Very long slow efforts at 75-80% of anaerobic threshold and long tempo efforts at 85-90% of anaerobic threshold effort or pace lasting for 30-90 minutes depending on level of ftness
Product: Muscular Endurance - a big effort over a long period
Contents: Move anaerobic threshold to a higher % of maximum effort and increase ability to buffer metabolic acid production
Directions for use:
•      AT intervals: Work time 5-20min./ rest 1– 8min.
•      Progressive Sets: Continuous long efforts with progressing intensity
•      e.g. tempo(T)- anaerobic threshold (AT)-super AT 1 set lasts 6-15 minutes
Product: Strength
Contents: Remove neural inhibition and synchronize neural recruitment of muscle motor units
Directions for use:
•      Weight training
•      Hill sprints
•      Individual leg training on bike
•      Short sprints with lots of recovery
Product: VO2 max-aerobic capacity training
Contents: Improve ability of muscles to use oxygen, improve anaerobic threshold,
improve cardio-pulmonary function
Directions for use: Very hard training with efforts lasting 1-3 (5) minutes depending on ftness level. Rest between efforts should be equal to the effort. Do not exceed recommended dose. Use sparingly for up to six week period.
My cart is full. If I incorporate these tools in conjunction with my season plan, I’ll have touched the training bases that will point me squarely toward realizing my potential. I can’t think of anything better, can you? Have fun out there.
Jim Bruskewitz (ep1@charter.net) coaches triathletes online www.enduranceperformance.com, and is a Lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Kinesiology.
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Hammer Nutrition Body Care Line : Bill Misner, Ph.D. & Steve Born
In Brian’s welcome letter in the last edition of Endurance News (#57), he mentioned the addition of specifc body care products to the Hammer Nutrition product line. In this issue, we’re excited to announce that all four of the products that currently comprise our body care line are now in stock.
As you know, for the past 21 years we’ve been zealous about supplying you, our valued clients, with the highest quality products you can put in your body. Now, you can count on the same high standards and unsurpassed quality when it comes to products you put on your body.
Hammer Balm
We introduced Hammer Balm in late summer last year. It’s a product that many of you are already using, and one that we’ve received a lot of positive feedback on regarding its effectiveness. For those of you who have yet to try the product, Hammer Balm, as you might suspect from the name, is an muscle balm—a transdermal, deep penetrating, analgesic compound —designed to alleviate the pain and discomfort associated with sore muscles and infamed joints. The difference between Hammer Balm and a vast number of products on the market is that Hammer Balm is 100% natural and completely free of camphor, menthol, petroleum, and other harsh chemicals.
One of the problems with many of the creams, lotions, and salves that are frequently used is the strong and unpleasant menthol/hot pepper odor. Another is that many of these products irritate the skin, causing a painful “burning” sensation. While many who
use these popular products feel, via the combination of strong smell and hot skin, that “something must be going on,” the fact is that very little is actually happening; most topical applications fail to permeate deep through the skin barrier to capillary beds to benefcially affect infamed muscle areas.
That’s precisely why, when designing Hammer Balm, one of the goals— perhaps the primary goal—was to
reproduce the superb skin permeation effects of DMSO but without the side effects associated with this compound: pungent odor, skin irritation, and halitosis (bad breath). In fact, it is the putrid, garlic-like odor in the breath, nasal passages, and sweat commonly associated with DMSO use, that provides ample evidence of its permeation abilities. Unfortunately, that “plus” is greatly overshadowed by the aforementioned negatives associated with DMSO. That was the gist of the challenge facing us.
For over nine months, a tremendous number of topical formulations were tested—along with a select group of anti-infammatory ingredients—in the hopes of attaining effective skin penetration without unpleasant side effects. Finally, after a long and oftentimes frustrating trial and error process of testing various compound formulations, the right combination was found. A precise mixture of distilled water, a unique alcohol/organic emulsifying agent (Isopropyl Myristate), and a number of specifc liposomes (primarily
soy lecithin), was shown to effectively permeate the skin barrier. Mission accomplished!
Hammer Balm’s anti-infammatory ingredients
With the achievement of effective skin penetration, the next goal was to select ingredients that would effectively and safely provide relief for muscle pain. The following were chosen:
Arnica – Helps infammatory conditions of the skin and helps to reduce bruising. Topically applied, Arnica also accelerates the healing of sprains due to its helenalin and dihydrohelanin content.
Ginger – Inhibits the infammatory eicosanoids that contribute to the pain and infammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.
Capsaicin – Reduces the musculoskeletal pain associated with fbromyalgia: improves the mobility and fexibility of the joints (by inhibiting the activity of Substance P and by preventing the destruction of cartilage): and alleviates the pain associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and tendonitis.
Clove oil – The primary active ingredients are known as eugenols (Eugenyl Acetate, Isoeugenol, Caryophllene, and Isocaryophyllene), which effectively reduce pain. For example, when Eugenol is applied topically with a cotton ball to an aching tooth, it resolves the pain.
Effective ingredients + special proprietary process = positive results!
Making Hammer Balm is defnitely
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not an easy process. In fact, an eight-stage process that requires 28+ hours to grind, emulsify, blend, and cure all the ingredients is required to make a single batch! It’s worth the effort however, as the results are impressive. In fact, prior to its introduction, Hammer Balm was tested on over 100 subjects ages 35-67. The results were overwhelmingly positive: not one subject reported negative side effects, all subjects reported positive anti-infammation results, and the majority of the subjects asked a question to the effect of, “Why doesn’t it burn my skin or have that overwhelming menthol odor like so many other products?”
Finally, you can enjoy effective muscle pain relief without the nasty smell or burning skin effects that are so common with other analgesics. Once you try Hammer Balm, you won’t want (nor need) to go back to whatever product you may have been using. It’s available in a 1/4 ounce trial size for $4.95, and in a 1 ounce jar for $19.95.
Cool Feet
The second body care product now available is Cool Feet, a super concentrated, anti-odor, anti-fungal foot powder. This product is super effective and a little goes a long way, so there is no need to fll your shoes or socks like you might with other products. It contains no petroleum products, harsh chemicals, or metals. Cool Feet helps prevent odor, burning, itching, blistering, and other foot fungus-related symptoms. On top of that, it smells nice too! Cool Feet can be used in your everyday shoes, but you’ll really notice just how effective it is when you use it during hot-weather exercise.
Cool Feet’s unique formula
Arrowroot is nourishing and soothes irritation internally as well as externally. It’s known to have been cultivated as far back as 5000 B.C. We chose this ingredient instead of
cornstarch because many people have corn sensitivities.
Baking Soda is a deodorant and moisture absorber. It relieves itching and helps to balance pH. Baking Soda is also found in therapeutic mineral springs.
French White and French Green Clays are mined from bedrock quarries in France and then sun-dried. They absorb excess oils, impurities, and toxins from the skin. They also exfoliate, thereby improving skin circulation. French Clays contain benefcial trace minerals and improve tone and strength in connective tissue.
Peppermint oil
has been used in
ancient China,
Egypt and Japan,
and is now currently
used in Europe and
the Americas. It is an antipruritic, meaning it relieves itching. Peppermint oil is also an antiseptic, antimicrobial, antiviral, and astringent.
Basil oil is native to India, and is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. It has prophylactic properties (helps to prevent infection). It is also an antiseptic and soothes itching.
Bay oil is an antiseptic, which destroys or prevents microbes, and is an astringent. It is a bactericidal and fungicidal as well.
Sage oil reduces perspiration, and is an anti-infammatory. It also is known for its antibiotic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, and astringent qualities.
Tea Tree oil is an antifungal, antiseptic, and antimicrobial. It helps to relieve skin irritations. Tea Tree is an immunostimulant – the more your body is exposed to harmful organisms, tea tree increases its response.
Clove oil has pronounced antiseptic, antisthetic, and antibiotic properties. Clove is also an antioxidant and an antiviral, which inhibits the growth of
viruses.
With Cool Feet you get exactly what you want out of a foot-care product without having to douse your feet with copious amounts of powders or sprays that contain chemical additives, petroleum products, or metals. In spite of the fact that Cool Feet contains none of those unwanted ingredients, it’s potent and effective… so much so, in fact, that you only need to use it 3-4 times a week to achieve benefcial results.
Cool Feet is available in a 3 gram sample size packet for $1.50 and a 2.7 ounce container for $11.95.
Soni-Pure
You probably already know that good personal hygiene—which includes frequent hand washing—is arguably the best way to avoid illness and prevent the spread of germs. This has led to the rise and frequent use of waterless hand sanitizers or towelette-type products. However most, if not all, of these products are alcohol based and contain chemical ingredients, which is why we were compelled to produce an effective alternative.
If you are a frequent user of hand sanitizers or moist towelettes, or if you don’t use them because of their composition, Soni-Pure is a product you’ll defnitely want to try. It’s petroleum and alcohol-free so it won’t dry your skin or expose you to harsh chemicals. What it will do is provide an effective defense against germs and bacteria. In fact, Soni-Pure has been shown to kill aerobic bacteria, yeast, mold, and fungi 100% for up to eight hours.
The power of Soni-Pure
Tests on the ingredients in Soni-Pure, some of which are used in Cool Feet as well, have been shown to signifcantly inhibit microbial proliferation on human skin.
Peppermint oil has been reported to
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Cyclo-CLUB : The ultimate cycling club and resource center : Angela Nock
Become a member of the ULTIMATE cycling training, nutrition, and motivation resource center in the world and earn free Hammer product!
New this year to Hammer Nutrition is the Cyclo-CORE set of DVD’s, the brainchild of cyclist Graeme Street. A complete training and nutrition system for cyclists of any level, the Cyclo-CORE DVD’s are a worthy addition to the library of any athlete.
Adding another level to the benefts of Cyclo-CORE is the new Cyclo-CLUB and Hammer Nutrition is pleased to be a part of it. Read an excerpt from Graeme explaining a bit more about this exciting new resource.
Dear fellow Everyday Cyclist,
This is what you’ve been waiting for! The ULTIMATE Cycling CLUB and Membership Resource Center for the passion of the everyday cyclist is open and we want you to join today!
The Cyclo-CLUB membership is your opportunity to become a part of the
fastest growing global cycling community and resource center in the world! This is YOUR OPPORTUNITY to be a part of cycling!
This will be your CLUB! You are the focus. No matter where you live, how old you are, how ft you are or how long you’ve been riding. We’re ALL Everyday Cyclists and this is where we come to train, learn, share, and grow together! You will develop bonds with cyclists just like you from other clubs and areas around the world, everyday!
Cyclo-CLUB is a cycling driven community developed by cyclists, for cyclists! Our primary mission is to work together to offer you the VERY BEST cycling related training, nutrition, motivation, incentive, expert insight, exclusive features & cycling secrets, & specials to support the Passion for Why You Ride!
I look forward to riding with you here, in your Cyclo-CLUB!
Graeme Street,
Owner and Senior Administrator
Hammer Nutrition has partnered with Graeme and will be offering a variety of incentives to join Cyclo-CLUB. First, when you sign-up with Cyclo-CLUB through Hammer Nutrition, you’ll receive product credit to use on future Hammer Nutrition orders! As a Basic annual member, you’ll receive $20.00, and $30.00 when you join as a Platinum member. Second, as a Cyclo-CLUB member you’ll have exclusive access to the live forums and round tables that feature Steve Born. We currently are not offering live seminars and forums on our site, and while Steve gives many talks each year at events, we know it’s not possible that everyone can attend. Joining Cyclo-CLUB gives you the opportunity to hear Steve live!
Take a look at the facing page for a breakdown of what each membership includes and then cruise on over to www. hammernutrition.com/cyclo-club and join the club!
HOT TIPS : Triathletes - Change fuel & decrease calories before T2!
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Hammer Wants YOU to Become a Member of the ULTIMATE Cycling Training, Nutrition, and Community Membership in the World.
Cyclo-CLUB Basic Membership
Cyclo-CLUB Platinum Membership
Access to all Cyclo-CLUB weekly agenda tips, workouts, nutrition resources, expert insights, Q&A and special CLUB features
Access to CLUB LEVEL Training Plan Downloads, select iPod Downloads, Techniques, Stretching PDF’s and select Cyclo-CORE Training Workouts and updates
20% off all Cyclo-CORE Training and Nutrition Programs/DVD’s and Complete Training Systems
Access to all CLUB Community Forums and Blogs with moderated support, motivation, and sharing
Access to all upcoming Cyclo-CLUB Incentive Programs, Motivation Prizes, and CLUB Contests
Access to all expert departments including Bike Fit, Coach Al’s Corner, Ladies Let’s Ride!, Bike Mechanic, Techn’Spec, and more to come!
Access to Graeme’s CLUB consults and bi­monthly live teleseminars on CLUB topics and discussion
$99.95/year
+ $20 Hammer credit!
Access to all the same content and info as Basic CLUB LEVEL Membership outlined to your left.
Exclusive PLATINUM LEVEL access & benefts
Access to Platinum Training and Nutrition Forums with expert answers and moderation
Access to Platinum Downloads including; All Training Plans, All Cyclo-CORE iPod Downloads, PDF Downloads, and Advanced Training
Access to the monthly Platinum Expert Round Table Teleseminars and Expert Info iPod Downloads
$199.95/year *
+ $30 Hammer credit!
*Platinum memberships are limited. Act fast.
Become part of the CLUB today! www.hammernutrition.com/cyclo-CLUB
Cyclo-CLUB & Hammer Nutrition
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New Paradigm Performance Enhancement : Jeb Stewart, MS, PES
Introduction
For better or for worse, an inherent element of competing in endurance athletics involves where an individual places within an event. It’s that good old, inescapable outcome factor, as determined by who you fnished in front of, and hopefully not behind, right? Of course it is, and rightly so, as it’s hardly a competition if there isn’t a way to determine a winner and where the rest of the competitors come in behind them and in what order. This sounds sensible and harmless enough so far, so what’s the problem? Let me explain.
The issue
In working with countless numbers of athletes over the years, I have witnessed a growing number of them being incredibly hard on themselves. Whether it’s for simply making a mistake during a race or for not performing up to their expectations, this kind of self-mental-abuse, for lack of a better description, can be an issue at any time of the season, but it tends to rear its ugly head much more so early on. Now, I understand that we all want to do our very best as often as possible and even express our subtle dismay of not achieving this outcome. However, the phenomenon I’m describing is that of an athlete hyper-focusing on the negative rather than simply acknowledging it, making note to work on it and then moving on with life, unencumbered by somewhat obsessive remorse, disappointment, and frustration.
This habit is one of the most self-destructive things that I witness athletes do. I can also speak from personal experience, because I spent many of my early years “punishing” myself in this
fashion and as the result, had a lot less fun, and I am sure, was a lot less fun to be around. Not only is it incredibly debilitating on an athletes performance but it also tends to take away the joy of the sport. The bad news is that this is a major performance limiter in sport and in life. However, the good news is that with an open mind and a few simple action steps, you can put this behind you by simply shifting your mental approach to improving your performance in the very sport that you enjoy so much.
Stepping into the solution
The frst step to overcoming this habit is to simply become aware that it is even an issue for you. If not, or if you don’t feel that it is, then there’s no use pursuing this matter any further, as with overcoming any issue, awareness is the frst step in arriving at a solution. The next step is to shift your mental focus from the negative. While performance enhancement does require acknowledging our limiters and working on them, continuously thinking about and beating yourself up over them doesn’t change anything. It only reinforces the behavior, thoughts, and beliefs and makes you feel worse. Left unexamined and unaddressed, it tends to get worse and is likely to happen even more often. It is a well known and documented fact that the very things which we choose to focus our thoughts on, not only increases the frequency and magnitude of those thoughts within our own minds, but they tend to start showing up in our lives in many forms. These can include sickness, injuries, repeated lackluster performance, and so on. By simply shifting our mental focus from what we don’t want, to what we do want or would like to achieve, relief is often almost felt and experienced
immediately and the long-term result is typically an improvement in performance and the achievement of one’s goals in sport and in life.
The second part of improving our performance and our experience during competition is by taking note of the mistakes that we did make, owning them completely and then either practicing them, if improving them is the answer, or doing something completely differently if we determine though personal refection that we simply made the wrong choice. Allow yourself to be human by giving yourself the freedom to make mistakes. The only way for a mistake to be a “bad” thing is if we repeat the same one over and over again and don’t learn the lesson that it’s trying to teach us. Simply take note of what error you made, work on correcting it or making a different choice, and play it forward the next time around.
Easier said than done
While none of this is particularly complicated, it can be quite diffcult to integrate into your life and to have the discipline to practice it on almost a daily basis. Habitual ways of thinking and our core beliefs are not easy to break once they’ve been formed over years of “practice”. So, if you fnd yourself struggling to make these changes on your own, please reach out to a good coach, sport psychologist, or combination thereof, as they can really help you with this. There is also a growing body of knowledge and information in the form of books and research papers currently available on the subjects. Learning to live in the NOW takes guidance and lots of practice. However, once you are more able to do so, training, racing and even
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BODY CARE from page 17
generate antibacterial effects. Both clove and basil exhibit antimicrobial effects on the detrimental bacteria Shigella fexneri.
Both Clove oil and Bay oil contain Eugenol, an antiviral substance, which has virucidal (destructive to viruses) effects and has even been shown to be effective in inhibiting herpesvirus replication in vitro.
Tea Tree Oil has been shown to inhibit or kill many detrimental micro-organisms such as Eschericia coli, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Propionibacterium acnes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus pyogenes, Detrimental Fungi on the Skin, Candida albicans, Pityrosporum ovale, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Detrimental Protozoa, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1-2.
With a potent ingredient list like that it came as no surprise that Soni-Pure passed testing with fying colors. Soni-Pure inhibited Aerobic Bacteria proliferation, in an ideal growth-enhancing environment, by a factor of 1000 times. Soni-Pure also inhibited Yeast/Mold-Fungus proliferation in an
enclosed growth-enhancing environment a factor of 100 times. Needless to say, that’s effective! Soni-Pure is powerful, yet is all natural and petroleum-free. Additionally, its alcohol-free formula won’t dry out your hands.
Soni-Pure is available in two forms: a towelette (FREE SAMPLE! Just ask for one on your next order) and in a 2.7-ounce plastic pump-dispense bottle for $7.95.
Summary
Our belief is that what you put on your body (i.e., your skin) is as important as what you put in your body. That’s precisely why we designed a line of body care products that is produced using the same uncompromising standards that go into our supplements and fuels.
For over two decades, you’ve come to trust Hammer Nutrition to provide natural, healthy, and effective fuels and supplements, and you can apply that same trust to our line of body care products. You won’t fnd these products anywhere else. They’re completely safe, extremely effective, and they are fully guaranteed to work for you. Start giving the outside of your body the same care that you give the inside with the Hammer Nutrition Body Care products!
Body Care products : Cool Feet, Soni-Pure, Hammer Balm
HOT TIPS : Homemade Recoverite
Recoverite : Preserve your hard-earned gains!
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Why Hammer Whey? : Steve Born
Protein is a crucial component for recovery and immune system health and for both of those there is no better protein source than whey protein, ideally whey protein isolate. Here’s a primary reason why:
Of all protein sources, whey protein isolate has the highest Biological Value (BV) rating. The BV is an accurate indicator of biological activity of protein, a scale used to determine the percentage of a given nutrient that the body utilizes. In other words, BV refers to how well and how quickly your body can actually use the protein that you consume… that’s of major importance for enhanced recovery. Here’s how some of the various proteins stack up BV-wise:
•      Whey protein isolate – 154
•      Whey protein concentrate – 104
•      Whole eggs – 100
•      Egg whites (albumin) – 88
•      Casein – 77
•      Soy – 49
Note: When the BV system was introduced eggs had the highest known BV and thus were given a value of 100. Whey proteins came to researchers’ attention later, and they rang up even higher scores. The 154 BV of whey protein isolate and the 104 BV of whey concentrate are in comparison with the original BV benchmark, whole eggs.
Whey isolate vs. Whey concentrate
Whey concentrate is a decent whey protein but it’s not the best; whey isolate is. So when you use whey protein make sure you use whey protein isolate, not whey protein concentrate. Whey isolate checks in at a sturdy 90-97+% protein, whereas whey concentrate contains only 70-80% protein so you get more
actual protein using isolate instead of concentrate. Additionally, whey protein isolate is virtually lactose and fat free. Many lactose-intolerant people can still use whey protein isolate because it contains only a minuscule amount of lactose.
The case against casein
Casein protein has generated some interest, primarily among the bodybuilding crowd, as being a quality protein source. We do not believe this to be true and the article “Casein: Quality protein choice?” from Endurance News #57 provides our rationale why it is not a source of protein we recommend. In a nutshell, aside from casein having a signifcantly lower BV than whey protein isolate, here are some reasons why casein is not your best choice:
* Excess casein (in animal studies) reduces life expectancy
* Excess casein (beta-casein a1 form) increases the risk of atherosclerosis
* Casein is responsible for allergy onset
* Excess casein increases cholesterol
Note: You can fnd the article in its entirety on the Hammer Nutrition web site.
Hammer Whey’s generous glutamine donation
Glutamine is a remarkable, multi-benefcial amino acid that’s essential for endurance athletes in supporting enhanced recovery and immune system function. Glutamine plays a signifcant role in the glycogen synthesis process, and along with the branched chain amino acids, it helps repair and rebuild muscle tissue. In addition, glutamine has also been shown to help raise
endogenous levels of glutathione, which is intimately involved in immune system health. Glutamine also contributes to growth hormone release and is a key component for intestinal health.
While many protein powders have minimal if any amounts of glutamine in them, each scoop of Hammer Whey contains a whopping six grams (6,000 mg) of this extraordinary amino acid (note: each two scoops of Recoverite contains 3 grams of glutamine).
Summary
Hammer Whey and the whey protein used in Recoverite is a pure un-denatured whey protein isolate of the highest quality. It is 97.7% pure, and virtually fat-free (0.5 g fat/100g), and carbohydrate-free (0.5 g lactose/100g). The whey protein isolate in Hammer Whey and Recoverite delivers rich immune-enhancing beta-lactoalbumins and alpha-lactalbumins. Hammer Whey has a unique profle of highly bioavailable protein with immune factors, potent branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), lactoferrin, and immunoglobulins. Independent laboratory tests show the PDCAAS (Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score) for the whey protein isolate in Hammer Whey and Recoverite is a whopping 1.14, a score that exceeds all of those reported for egg, milk, caseinates, and soy protein.
When it comes to enhancing recovery between workouts—maximizing glycogen synthesis, supporting immune system function, and rebuilding lean muscle tissue—you simply won’t fnd a better protein source than whey protein isolate, which is the only kind found in both Hammer Whey and Recoverite.
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Hammer Whey : A nine month trial : Bill Nicolai
Following the publication of a tip in the Endurance News a year ago, I began to use the supplementation protocol suggested by Brian Frank: consuming one scoop of Hammer Whey in plain water two hours after the last meal of the day before bedtime. Here are the results I have obtained;
• I have lost 7 lbs of body weight in the last nine months. This has mostly taken place during the off season when I have been exercising only 10 to 15 hours a week versus 20 to 25 hours weekly in the summer months.
• Muscularity has increased noticeably. This off season I did two free weight sessions per week, and one strength/e-stim session per week on the major large leg muscle groups (glutes and quads). In previous years I have followed the exact same pattern without the gains I observed this winter.
• Coming into the early cycling season, I am riding stronger than ever. At the Tucson Hammer/Cycling House Camp in February, participants I had ridden with before observed better hill climbing and stronger overall riding than they had seen previously. This increase in cycling ability was confrmed at the season opener time trial in late February where I rode my second fastest time ever on the 20 K course (+20 sec) and fnished in the upper third of my age group.
• From my own observations, those of my friends, and in my early season race results, it is apparent that my ftness has increased signifcantly this off-season and I believe that the use of Hammer Whey according to the Hammer Nutrition recommended protocol is a signifcant contributor to this highly
desired result.
The theory of why the daily supplementation with whey works is that it enables the natural production and utilization of human growth hormone (hGH) which is stimulated by the recent training activities. It has been found that athletes in their 60s, such as me, produce only 20%-25% of the amount of this key hormone as younger persons. This may be one reason why we older athletes fail to obtain the same training gains as our younger counterparts. This hormone, hGH, which is somewhat mysteriously produced in brief bursts by the pituitary gland during sleep, is apparently responsible for signifcant anabolic effects. It is hypothesized that the consumption of a pre-bedtime 20 to 28 gram dose of whey signifcantly increases the production of hGH during sleep. Exactly why this occurs is not known. For a more complete discussion of this subject see the articles by Dr. Bill Misner and Steve Born:
•      “Hammer Whey’s Glutamine—An hGh boosting nutrient” (EN#55)
•      “More about Whey & hGH” (EN#56)
If the gains in hGH are occurring, as I believe they are, then at a daily cost of just over $1 a day, consumption of Hammer Whey is a remarkably inexpensive way for athletes to enable the benefts of signifcantly increased hGH.
Increasing hGH does work to improve muscle development and training recovery. This fact is regrettably borne out by the widespread use of synthetic hGH by the professional cycling community and other persons wishing
to gain its benefts, such as noted actors and even wealthy lay persons who wish to look younger and lose weight. At a cost of about $20 a day to receive injections of this hormone if prescribed by a physician, this product is within the means of many people who have a doctor willing to administer it. I strongly recommend that persons do not attempt to gain the benefts of the hormone in this way. It is noted that direct administration of hormones has a history of adverse side effects including cancer. The recent widespread breast cancer epidemic disaster caused by estrogen replacement therapy for menopausal women via oral hormone-containing drugs is ample evidence of the dangers of direct administration of such substances.
I think that the use of a concentrated natural food substance, whey protein, to stimulate my own natural endogenous production of hGH and thereby possibly raising it close to the levels of younger people, is a reasonable course to follow. This method is probably free of the potential hazards of injecting synthetic hormones. The assumption is that obtaining the hGH production as a natural secondary effect of exercise and diet, rather than directly by injection is safe because of the natural feedback mechanisms associated with such processes. This is much the same idea as why it is probably much safer to obtain increased red blood cells as a natural effect of endurance training rather than through the administration of EPO or blood transfusions. Likewise, I would never use steroids or administer testosterone, even if they were legal; there is just too much documented evidence of health hazards, particularly
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Hammer Camps : Follow-up & feedback from successful sessions! : Brian Frank
Looking back at the three Hammer Camps we did at The Cycling House in Tucson causes a food of fond memories of good times and new friends. So good, in fact, that I sometimes wonder whether I beneft more from these camps than the participants. In the fnal analysis however, I believe we all benefted beyond our expectations, which is why both participants and staff are eagerly looking forward—after a long summer of course—to the next round of Hammer Camps this December and February/ March of 2009.
Despite (or more likely because of) the immense diversity of the athletes who came to our camps, all ended up feeling completely comfortable in their group and enjoyed the experience on a profound level, as you can see from their feedback listed on the next page. In fact, many felt that the “community” aspect of the camp was one of the best parts. Our groups consisted of bond traders, building contractors, doctors, fnancial planners, commercial pilots, bankers, product managers, a psychologist, and even a rocket scientist. Some were roadies, some were triathletes and duathletes, some were mountain bike racers and some were ultracyclists. However, we all shared and reveled in our passion (or, perhaps more appropriately put, obsession) for exercise in one of the most amazing winter training destinations in the world. These camps have given me the opportunity to meet and really get to know so many cool people. If you are one of them, thank you for your time; it was a hoot.
Inevitably some campers later confessed their worries about whether the extensive down time at the house
after rides would be awkward, while others worried that they were not ft or fast enough to keep up, or that the food would be questionable. These concerns and others quickly faded after a day of the laidback, familial vibe that permeates The Cycling House and all of our rides and activities. The synergy created by combining all of the positive energy of clients and the CH staff is hard to describe. Having led four of these camps now, I can only say they just keep getting better and I’m stoked to be a part of them.
I have to give a lot of credit for the unique Hammer Camp “experience” to The Cycling House owner Owen Gue and his staff. Owen, his sister Elisabeth, Andy and Sam Schultz, and Brendan Halpin are all under 25, born and raised in Montana, and about the nicest people you could ever hope to meet. While the maturity and grace under pressure—not to mention business acumen—they exhibit is rare for folks their age, it’s the humble confdence, never complain, can do attitude that really sets them apart. And these are professional athletes, well, except for Elisabeth. There’s no cocky rock star, bling-bling, living-the-life guff you see so often these days. Suffce it to say that when you’ve grown up camping, hiking, fshing, hunting, cliff jumping, running from bears, enduring sub-zero winters, and so on, in the great outdoors of Montana, it takes an awful lot to rattle them. When you meet them, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.
Jim Bruskewitz complements and rounds out the group perfectly. Despite being one of the top Masters age group triathletes in the world, he’s as humble and mild mannered as anyone I’ve ever
met. You have to pry his long list of accomplishments out of him because he’d rather be talking about your training, gait, or swim technique. He also has a laidback approach to training and motivation that is easy to understand and embrace. You can’t hire him as a coach because he’s booked solid and has to turn away clients every year. However, by attending a Hammer camp, you can beneft tremendously from his vast experience and knowledge. Did I mention that he teaches kinesiology at UW Madison? Needless to say, if you want to talk about biomechanics, muscle development, and an encyclopedia of endurance knowledge, Jim is the man.
For my part, we certainly talked about diet, nutrition, and fueling throughout the camp, but more powerfully, we lived it too. For so many campers, even those who’ve been using our products for years, it was not until they went through one of these camps that they really got their diet and fueling to “click”. Every evening we talked about their fueling experience from that day’s ride in terms of what was working or not. This translated into further refnements that could be applied to the next day’s upcoming ride and training. Each morning we’d eat a healthy, protein rich breakfast and allow our food to digest while we all mixed our bottles and loaded our fuels together. Then, during the course of the rides, I’d go around checking each athlete to see that they were working on changing their habits to overcome previously determined issues. Some campers did not hydrate properly, some tended to over consume calories, some tended to under consume, etc. With constant help
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I am totally changing my fueling on the bike. I tried using Perpetuem at the camp and it worked really well for me. I will also use the Hammer Bars. This is a huge change and step forward for me!
Liz W
Just a note to let you know that I thoroughly enjoyed meeting you last week in Tucson. What a treat it was to spend a week riding and relaxing. The food was truly out of this world. My active recovery week is off to a great start as well. I look forward to seeing everyone at the races. I loved the energy at the Cycling House and the passion for wellness and excellence. It was an inspiration
Robert A
I had all the info and fuel I ever needed. Jim was awesome!! The food was outstanding. I am the guy who had the trip donated so I may be a little biased, but it was something I always wanted to do but could never afford. I had the time of my life, in fact you could read about it on mtbr and roadbike review. Everything was top notch from waking in the morning and having coffee ready to the cycling, food, and accommodations. It was a treat to meet and ride with Brian, he’s got a great company.
Chris W
The camp was just about perfect. The housing, the people, the staffng, the coaching, the rides, the support, were all wonderful.
David R
You provided a frst rate camp with everything and more included....thanks for a good experience. Nice friends made along the way!
Perry B
Going back next year and hopefully Montana this summer. Very positive experience. So refreshing and encouraging to see and to spend quality time with young people as responsible and respectful as these fve young people are. They made the week very special, notwithstanding the beauty of Tucson and the wonderful riding etc.
- Mark D
'08 - '09 Tucson Hammer Camp : Make reservations now!
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Zinc & 5-HTP Supplementation
Both zinc and 5-HTP are found in Appestat and 5-HTP is a component in REM Caps. We recently received the following questions regarding these two nutrients:
• Have you evaluated the safety of the zinc in Appestat when combined with other zinc sources? Each capsule contains 15 mg zinc so 2 at lunch and 2 at dinner provides 60 mg. Google™ zinc and you will fnd excessive absorption of zinc can suppress copper and iron absorption.
• What about the 20 mg of 5-HTP? Is there a concern with up to 80 mg from Appestat combined with 25 to 50 mg from [one to two] REM Caps?
Dr Bill replies
“Thank you for these questions; they are good ones. Appestat protocols recommend 3 weeks dose then 1 week off for up to 2 applications of up to 2 x 3 weeks. There is a week “vacation” fasting between 2 courses. I do have a few comments of interest to report…”
Zinc
Most orally ingested zinc is absorbed through the Jejunum. Zinc uptake across the brush border appears to occur by both a saturable, barrier-mediated mechanism and a non-saturable, non-mediated mechanism. Once zinc is within the enterocyte, it can be used for zinc-dependent processes, become bound to metallothionein and held within the enterocyte, or pass through the cell. Zinc is transported to the liver via the portal circulation. A fraction of zinc is extracted by the liver cells, and the remaining zinc is transported to the various cells of the body via the systemic circulation. Zinc
is transported in the plasma bound to albumin (approximately 80%), alpha-2-macroglobulin (approximately 18%) and to such proteins as transferrin and ceruloplasmin (approximately 2%).
So you can see that zinc availability is stressed, at times up until 100 mg becomes a daily chronic protocol. Copper needs to be taken if zinc intake is excessive. Chronic (long-term) ingestion of 100 mg or more of zinc per day may be toxic. Dosages of 500 mg or more of zinc per day is likely to produce toxic effects in many people. The optimal daily allowance (ODA) of zinc (for adults) is 15-50 mg per day. The recommended therapeutic dosage of supplemental zinc for athletes is 30-60 mg (of elemental) zinc per day. People using supplemental zinc to increase their endogenous testosterone levels usually use 50 mg of supplemental zinc per day. Clinical trials using zinc to treat tinnitus [ringing in the ears] involved the use of 600 mg of the zinc sulfate form of zinc (= 138 mg elemental zinc).
5-HTP
Supplemental 5-HTP is available from health food stores and mail order supplement companies (usually only in the USA, Canada, and Europe) in the form of 33-100 mg capsules. Supplemental 5-Hydroxytryptophan is used by many people as an alternative to tryptophan supplementation (due to restrictions on the sale of tryptophan in many regions and also due to 5-HTP being “one-step-closer” to the desired end-product of tryptophan supplementation, i.e. serotonin). Most orthomolecular-oriented physicians recommend the use of 300-600 mg of 5-HTP per day for the treatment of Depression &
Parkinson’s Disease. Unlike tryptophan, serotonin synthesis from 5-HTP is not rate-limited by any natural feedback control for Serotonin synthesis. 5-HTP bypasses this governing mechanism. This permits 5-HTP to signifcantly increase serotonin production by also increasing the potential for excessive serotonin synthesis. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors [SSRIs] “work” by counteracting defciency in the neurotransmitter, serotonin. They increase available serotonin by preventing serotonin receptors from soaking up recently released molecules of serotonin “foating” around freely in the synapses between neurons (inhibiting reuptake). In contrast, Tryptophan is a precursor for the production of NEW serotonin. This is regarded as a superior method of treating serotonin defciency compared to the modus operandi of SSRIs, which merely recycle OLD serotonin. I would caution any one taking 5-HTP to check with their physicians before taking it with any medications especially SSRIs.
Taken as directed without contraindicating medications, this product is safe and effective. Unfortunately, after a dietary supplement or prescription medication becomes property of the consumer, the control and judicious use of the substance is out of our jurisdiction.
Appestat : The healthy approach to weight loss
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Tissue Rejuvenator : Adequate amounts of glucosamine? : Bill Misner, Ph.D. & Steve Born
Many athletes take glucosamine for joint health and injury prevention/ rehabilitation. One of the questions we often receive is whether or not Tissue Rejuvenator has adequate amounts of this popular joint health nutrient, referring to sources that recommend 1000 to 1500 mg of glucosamine daily. Dr. Bill Misner responds (some of which is paraphrased) -
Four capsules (500 mg of each of the “big three” - Glucosamine Sulfate, Chondroitin Sulfate, and MSM) are generally taken as a maintenance and prevention dosage. Our development team chose this amount because we felt 500 mg would be adequate when used as a daily supplement to help healthy joints stay that way. During periods of injury or recovery, many individuals will take up to eight per day (1000 mg of each) or even more, with great success. The dosing is essentially based upon fexibility, with the option to take more if greater intake is warranted. Why there is not more in each individual capsule is really just a practical matter; because of the many other nutrients contained therein, the capsules would need to be larger than they already are to hold more.
As far as the studies often quoted are concerned, Dr. Misner says, “No argument here. They are precise noting dose effcacy @ 1500 mg/day occurred in time sequences ranging from 0.5-3.0 year duration in patients with established arthritic conditions.”
Sometimes acute trauma injuries can resolve with a lower dose that one might use for an overuse injury. A post-op patient might take a minuscule dose and fnd effective relief, while a functioning athlete might require a huge dose of 8-12 capsules daily to manage pain and infammation symptoms. What do we learn from these various examples? That when it comes to symptom relief, one size (of Tissue Rejuvenator) does not ft all!
The point is the Tissue Rejuvenator dose should be increased to achieve resolution of symptoms... minor acute onset taken at 500 mg level for 1-2 weeks before increasing to 1000-1500 mg/day, if effects were previously neutral.
I agree with what these studies report, but I do not agree that we can say one size that fts “Chronic” arthritic symptom resolution also fts “Acute” early onset
overuse injuries. My interpretation is start conservatively with two weeks at lower dose before increasing to the higher effectual dose demonstrated in research studies on a different subject population.
Tissue Rejuvenator : Stay in the game
BILL NICOLAI from page 23

cancer. When it comes to taking advantage of the benefts of the vital hormones that control so much of our development, I believe it is best to let the body produce them on its own rather than try to intervene artifcially.
This report is not a scientifcally controlled test, but my own results do seem to me to be compelling. It should be noted that I have made other dietary and lifestyle improvements in the same time period and am always
striving to do so. My opinion after 20 years of endurance athletics is that there is no single magic bullet, but one should take advantage of all the good training dietary and recovery knowledge available. The use of Hammer Whey appears to be a signifcant advance in the tools we have available to improve the results of our ftness endeavors.
Hammer Whey : Powerful protein
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day to day life becomes much simpler and more fun. After all, isn’t that why we started doing this to begin with? *Please see references at the end of the article.
Your benefts package
Below, I have listed just some of the many benefts that can be gained by participating in the early season races, particularly if our focus is on the process of getting better and having fun rather than simply on winning alone.
•      Having fun competing in the sport that you love
•      Reducing the nervousness felt before & during races
•      Improving your technical skills at race-specifc speeds
•      Enjoying the social aspect of racing in a lower stress atmosphere
•      Practicing racing while your expectations for yourself aren’t as high
•      Getting physically and mentally re-accustomed to the intensity of racing
•      Dialing in your pre-race routine, nutrition strategy & warm up to perfection
•      Simply getting better while having fun and learning to let go of the outcome
•      Getting used to bumping elbows or having feet in your face in a mass start event
So, as you can see, there are so many benefcial elements that one can gain by simply participating in early season events that are completely independent of where one ends up in the results.
However, it is completely up to the individual as to whether they decide to beat themselves up and miss the inherent opportunities for growth in any outing where every single thing outside of their control doesn’t go according to plan, or to beneft maximally from each and every experience. I hope that is as much of a no-brainer proposition to you as it is to me. With simple awareness, willingness, and discipline, these self-defeating habits can be turned into performance (and life) enhancing ones for good.
Putting it all together
It is these items listed earlier that I often mention to an athlete who is upset by where they did or didn’t place in an early season race after listening to their take on the experience and how they feel as the result. I empathize with them because I certainly know what it feels like to be disappointed, discouraged, aggravated and even stunned by a less than stellar performance. However, if we can just shift our focus to the process and to the positive elements that we experience during each outing, then it is much more likely that our basic human needs of acknowledgement, growth, and competence will be met, which is actually where all those feelings were coming from to begin with. In laymen’s terms, we can simply get better by letting go and having fun doing what we enjoy.
So, take it easy and give yourself a break. These seasons get longer every year, which gives us even more time to create the Inner Fitness© and the outer ftness that we desire and need to accomplish our goals. By simply shifting our focus to the present moment,
celebrating our successes, and allowing ourselves to make mistakes, we will have made a huge turn-around in our approach to performance and enjoying the sports we compete in. We can then go about doing things differently the next time around, thus guaranteeing us, at the very least, a more enjoyable experience and maybe even another lesson or two. And so the process goes.
Jeb has a Master’s degree in Exercise Science and Health Promotion and is certifed by the NASM, USA Triathlon and USA Cycling as an Elite Level Coach. He has been a Hammer Nutrition sponsored athlete for going on 7 years now. Jeb is quoted regularly in Bicycling Magazine and Runner’s World and contributes articles to Active.com, Iron Man Canada, the Daily Peloton, and the Ultra-Marathon Cycling Association.
He is a continuing education provider for USA Cycling and USA Triathlon, and owns and operates Enduroft, LLC, a coaching and consulting company dedicated to the education, performance, and life enhancement of athletes and coaches. For more information about our upcoming educational events as well as our products, services, and philosophy, please pay us a visit at www.enduroft.com or contact us directly at info@enduroft.com.
References
Church, Dawson Ph.D. (2007). The Genie in Your Genes, Epigenetic Medicine and the New Biology of Intention Dawson. (Santa Rosa: Elite Press)
Engles, Lisa. 2008. “Coaching from the Inside Out”. Online Lecture Course & Mentoring. Los Gatos, CA. February, 2008.
HOT TIPS : Freeze your fish oilhttp://www.hammernutrition.com/EN/EN58/May2008.html#Pg_23
from Jim and the other staffers, each camper was lovingly admonished to drink more, drink less, take electrolytes, or whatever they needed to work on.
We’ve already set the dates for three more camps, so you can start planning early. December 9th to 14th is our “pre-Christmas, de-stress, base miles, hang out and enjoy” camp. The other two camps are in February of 2009, one from the 2nd to the 8th and the other from the 23rd to March 1st. We lengthened the February camps to six days because
fve just wasn’t long enough! These will be more structured, higher volume pre-season base/season launch type camps. I’ll be hosting the December and late February camps, while Steve Born will be your host for the early February camp.
Sign up for one or more today… you’ll have the time of your life! Click on the “camps” link at the top of our web site or call one of our friendly advisors for more details or to register now. We hope to see you in Tucson!
Salmon Oil : Recover even faster with Salmon Oil
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PSA Caps : Premium prostate protection
The Endurance Athlete's Guide to Success : The 8th edition is in stock! : Steve Born
We’re extremely excited to announce that the latest edition of this much-acclaimed knowledge resource is fnally here. The term “labor of love” defnitely comes to mind when we think about the time and energy spent writing, rewriting, editing, proofng, and compiling the articles and accompanying photos/captions for this latest edition. In fact, so much time was invested on this project that it hardly seems true that the actual books are here “in the fesh.” But they are indeed here and we are convinced that this latest edition is the most comprehensive, yet easy-to-read-and-understand manual available in regards to how to properly fuel the body prior to, during, and after exercise.
The 8th edition of “The Guide” contains expanded, even more informative versions of pre-existing articles:
•      Hydration—What you need to know
•      Electrolyte Replenishment
•      Proper Caloric Intake During Endurance Exercise
•      Recovery—A crucial component for athletic success (formerly entitled Superior Recovery)
•      The Pre-Race Meal
•      The 10 Biggest Mistakes Endurance Athlete’s Make
•      The Hammer Nutrition Fuels— What they are and how to use them
In addition, we’ve added two new articles:
•      Replacement vs. Replenishment
•      Supplementation—A necessity for athletes
As a result of these two new articles, the amount of new information in the existing articles, and even more photos than before, this latest edition of “The
Guide” is the biggest ever at 134 pages long. That’s six times more content than the frst edition, which was a slender 22 pages when it was frst published roughly six years ago.
As Brian so appropriately wrote in his letter in Endurance News #56, “While great products and friendly service are certainly key, it’s the knowledge component that is most important. It’s a simple fact that no matter how good the products are, if they are used incorrectly, less than optimal results or downright failure will result.”
With that said, we have no doubt that the fueling-specifc knowledge you need to achieve success as an endurance athlete is found in the pages that make up the 8th edition of The Endurance Athlete’s Guide to Success. This is a “must read,” especially for new clients, and for existing clients—even if you’ve read all seven previous versions—we encourage you to check out this latest edition for updated information in the existing articles and, of course, the important information contained in the two new articles.
Hard copies of The Endurance Athlete’s Guide to Success are $4.95 each. Or, you can download a copy of the 8th edition, completely free of charge, at www.hammernutrition.com/guide.
Endurance News Staff
Editorial : Steve Born, Dr. Bill Misner, Brian Frank
Editorial Contributors : Jim Bruskewitz, Giovanni
Ciriani, Suzy Degazon, Shane Eversfeld, Sonia Frank,
Owen Gue, Chris Kostman, Nate Llerandi, Al Lyman,
Bill Nicolai, Tony Schiller, Jeb Stewart
Layout : Angela Nock
Editing : Justin Ward (Articles from contributors are not edited.)
Our Mission
The objective of Endurance News is to provide you, the serious endurance athlete, with a valuable resource that you will fnd to be informative, educational, thought provoking and helpful in your ongoing pursuit of optimum performance and health.
Endurance News features insightful articles on diet, nutrition, training and other topics of interest for endurance athletes -written by myself as well as professional and elite amatuer athletes and other experts in the area of nutrition and exercise. In addition, Endurance News will include articles highlighting new and existing Hammer Nutrition products and how to get the maximum benefts from them.
In reading this and future issues, please remember that the views expressed in this publication will always be biased in favor of a healthy diet, hard training that emphasizes quality over quantity, and prudent supplementation to improve health and performance. But above all, we at Endurance News believe there are no short cuts, and success can only come from hard work.
Back issues are available at www.hammernutrition.com
Legal Disclaimer : The contents of Endurance News are not inteded to provide medical advice to individuals. For medical advice, please consult a licensed health care specialist.
©2008 Endurance Marketing Group. This information is copyright protected. Please feel free to distribute this information as long as the copyright notice, phone number, and/or URL are included. Content must remain unchanged and original authorship acknowledged.
The Endurance Athlete's Guide to Success : It's Finally Here!
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Athlete Spotlight : Amanda McIntosh
Our “Spotlight” athlete for this issue is Amanda McIntosh from San Antonio, Texas, and this is the second time we’re featuring her (she was our very frst “Spotlight” athlete, interviewed for EN#30 back in 2001). No, we’re certainly not running out of athletes to feature but Amanda is an extraordinary athlete, especially considering the results she’s achieved after going through a period where she was injured and unable to do much, if anything, in the way of training or racing. In addition, Amanda is a long­time client, a friend to everyone here at Hammer Nutrition, and a tremendous representative of the company, not just in her athletics, but also in her coaching services and as one of our in-the-feld reps for the company. As a result of all that, we thought it’d be interesting and fun to interview her again.
Her race resume is, to say the least, impressive. Here is just a fraction of some of the highlights from her illustrious career:
1998 – 1st place – Rocky Raccoon 100 mile trail race
1999 – US 50 mile National Champion
1999 – 1st place – Leadville Trail 100 mile trail race
2000 – 1st place – Leadville Trail 100 mile trail race
2000 – Bronze medal – US 50 mile championships
2001 – 1st place – Crown King 50K, High Mountain 25K, Inks Lake 50K, Rocky Hills 50K
2002 – 1st place – Rocky Raccoon 50 mile, Rocky Hills 50K
2003 – 1st place – Palo Duro 50 mile
2004 – 1st place – Bandera Trails 100K, Hill Country 50K
2004 – 2nd Female, 8th overall –Rocky Raccoon 100 mile Trail Race
2005 – 1st place – Bandera Trails 50K,
Big Bend 50 mile,
2005 – World Masters Association 100K Champion – Bariloche, Argentina.
2006 – 1st place – Bandera Trails 50K (course record), Big Bend 50K (course record), Bear Creek 100K 2007 – 1st place Q50 Patagonia (50 mile race in Traful, Argentina)
Amanda hasn’t slowed down at all in 2008, posting these outstanding results thus far:
Bandera 100K –2nd Female, 7th overall Copper Canyon 50 mile –1st Female, 15th overall
Whew! I get tired just looking at all those races! Anyway, without further ado, here’s the interview I recently had with Amanda.
STEVE: Amanda, you’re the frst and only “repeat” athlete featured in the “Athlete Spotlight” section of the newsletter, which I think is pretty cool. How does that make you feel?
AMANDA: I was incredibly honored the frst time you asked me to be the featured athlete, so being asked again is incredible. I am so fortunate to have the support of Hammer; I could not have accomplished the earlier-listed goals without the products and assistance throughout the years.
STEVE: I know we asked this back in 2001 but, for the sake of our readers who weren’t with us back then, could you describe how you got started in ultra running and when you frst realized that ultra distance running was the sport for you?
AMANDA: I was a competitive gymnast for most of my young life but a career
ending knee injury sent me on the road to ruin. By the time I started college I was an overweight, smoking, bartender. Believe it or not, friends at the bar got me running and I got hooked. I gave up cigarettes, changed my major to Exercise Physiology, and got in shape. I ran short races just to stay ft until I met a group of women training in Dallas. Running with them I was inspired to complete my frst marathon, Pikes Peak (28 mile round trip to the top of the mountain, 14,000 ft, and back down). It was an amazing experience. I ran road marathons for several years until I decided to do a 50K that led to a 50 mile and then my frst 100 in 1998 (Rocky Raccoon). I had a blast and knew I had found my niche!
STEVE: We’ve listed a handful of the races you’ve competed and excelled in. Of those races, which one (or more) would you consider your best? Describe what you were feeling during those races.
AMANDA: Believe it or not, I think the answer was my last race in Copper Canyon, Mexico. I didn’t really have any expectations; I just started at a decent pace and kept going. I felt like everything clicked and I could have run forever. The biggest thing for me was that my nutrition was right on! My combination of Perpetuem, Hammer Gel, and Endurolytes was perfect and I felt great the entire race! It wasn’t that I was running fast but I was just in a groove, the course was amazing, the people were great, the day was beautiful, and I was on top of the world. My mom said I didn’t look like I had run around the block when I fnished.
STEVE: Conversely, which race would you say was the low point in your career, the
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one where “nothing went right,” so to speak? Can you describe what happened?
AMANDA: Interestingly, my “worst” race was one of my biggest victories. It was the Sunmart 50 mile. I was in the lead when I kicked a rock into my ankle. The pain was impressive and the swelling immediate. I had 12 miles to go and felt compelled to fnish so as not to let down my sponsors, etc. I had no idea if I had done serious damage to the ankle and in hind sight could have done permanent damage by continuing. I won the race but it was the most diffcult and miserable race of my career. I vowed that from then on to run from my heart and not for others. I haven’t had a bad race since!
STEVE: Which race or races are your favorites, the ones you perhaps want to continue to do annually? Describe why.
AMANDA: I have so many “favorites”… Here in Texas, I love Joe Prusaitis’ race series. In Colorado, I can’t wait to run in the mountains of Leadville. One of my favorites, which I can’t run anymore because I am now the race director, is the High Mountain 25 & 50K. Running with the Tarahumara Indians in Mexico was an experience I will repeat every year if I can. I would have to say, though, that my favorite races of all time are the Q50 races. I have been to one in Nicaragua and one in Patagonia and will try to go back every year. They are awesome races in amazing places.
STEVE: Let’s see…back in 2001 when we frst interviewed you, your son Ryan was 11 years old and your daughter Callie was 7 years old. Obviously, they’ve grown up quite a bit in the past seven years…what are they up to now? Is either of them into ultra running like their mom, or do they have other sports interests?
AMANDA: Well, Ryan is an Ice Hockey and Lacrosse player who is off to college this year. He is the youngest person to ever fnish the High Mountain 25K (he was 12 at the time), but hates to run! Callie, now 14, runs cross country, and plays basketball and soccer. She has been MVP of her cross country team two
years in a row and was 4th in the district this season. Neither of my kids shows any interest in being ultra runners but they have been unbelievable supporters of my running throughout the years. They have been understanding about my training and travel, and have even cracked the whip and sent me out for runs when I have lacked motivation. They are so proud of me and that makes me want to run harder, stronger, and longer!
world class athlete, to not even being able to walk a mile. It was pretty devastating at the time.
Finally one of my doctors started me on a once a week injection of a drug called Enbrel. The swelling went away within 48 hours! This was great I thought, except for the side effects (it’s an immune system suppressor) and the fact that it was $700 a dose. So the next year was spent trying to fgure out how to space the doses to control the symptoms but not cause unwanted side effects and send me to the poor house. My training was erratic to say the least. I was able to start and then I would become symptomatic and have to back off for a week. This went on for a year and was very frustrating, but at least I was able to run.
Finally, by October of 2007, I was free from infammation and on a schedule that seemed to be working with the Enbrel. A friend of mine asked me to come to the Q50 in Nicaragua. I told him no since I couldn’t run but he said I could help him out with the race. I decided to go and it was the turning point; being surrounded by runners and watching the amazing race made me want to start training and racing again. I made a commitment to attempt to train for the Q50 Patagonia. It was only 8 weeks away and I was only able to do about 25 miles/week with 10 miles being my long run. I signed up for the 25-mile relay and knew I could get through it. Four weeks into the training I changed my event to the full 50-mile race. Training was going well and I was symptom free so decided to go for it. Four weeks later I won the women’s division of the Q50 Patagonia. A month later I was second female, frst master, at the Bandera 100K, and two months after that I won the Copper Canyon Ultra 50 mile in Urique, Mexico.
STEVE: Wow, that’s a truly amazing comeback…congratulations!
AMANDA: It was a really tough road, but I feel like I have things under control with the arthritis and the medication. I am able to train at a high level but have to be super careful to eat well, sleep, recover, and listen to my body. Hammer
STEVE: Your career was halted rather abruptly by an injury that not only prevented you from training with any consistency (if at all), it may very well have been a career-ending injury. Can you describe what happened and how you were able to return to running?
AMANDA: In June of 2006, while training to go to the World Championships with the USATF Open 100K Team, my left knee flled with fuid. I could barely walk, let alone run. Several attempts to remove the fuid were futile. In August I was diagnosed with a rare genetic autoimmune condition called “reactive arthritis”. Basically it is an overactive immune system, which causes infammation in the joints. The orthopedists and rheumatologists tried conservative measures to reduce the infammation but were unsuccessful. In two months I had gone from being a
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Nutrition has been a huge part of my training and recovery through all of this. I have used, and continue to use, Premium Insurance Caps, Phytomax, Mito Caps, Race Caps Supreme, and Carlson Norwegian Salmon Oil daily to keep my immune system running well. Also, I love REM Caps because it helps with my sleep every night!
Tissue Rejuvenator has continued to be my answer to OTC anti-infammatories; I use 6-12/day and more when racing. Of course during training and racing I use Hammer Gel, HEED, Perpetuem, and Endurolytes. Recoverite is always a part of my post run/ race routine.
STEVE: What’s your training program look like these days and how different is it from earlier in your career and after your injury? During peak season, what’s a typical week look like for you?
AMANDA: I train hard and rest hard. I typically run 5-6 days per week and put in 70-100 miles per week. I try to do this mid-day when the kids are at school, or early mornings so as not to impact our family time. My training now is about the same as it was before. I have always been good about listening to my body and taking time to recover when I need to. During peak season my short run is 15 miles and my long run can be upward of 50 on a weekend. I take one day off completely and then try to take another day off every other week to run in the water. I also do strength training, yoga and core work.
Nutrition is a huge part of my training. My nutritionist, Laurel Tierney, monitors everything I eat and helps make sure I have everything I need to train and recover. When I am putting in the high miles it is a struggle to get enough calories and make sure I am eating the right foods for optimum
performance. Laurel manages to make sure every calorie I take in is from quality food and Hammer products in order to keep me at the top of my game.
STEVE: What races do you have planned for the rest of 2008? Any specifc goals in mind?
AMANDA: So far, I am planning to run the Rocky Hill 50K in April and see how I feel. I will be training in Leadville, Colorado for a while this summer and doing some multi-day trips. I will be going back to Nicaragua in October and Patagonia in December for the Q50 races. Right now my goal is to stay healthy and run strong.
STEVE: Do you ever think about retiring or do you want to keep racing for as long as you can?
AMANDA: I don’t think about retiring, I know I can’t keep winning forever, but I want to be out there running in races with all of my friends as long as I can. For me, going to races is more about meeting new people and seeing old friends than anything else. Racing is about doing something I love in a beautiful place with amazing people. Winning has been the result of all the passion.
STEVE: Tell us a little about your coaching services and web site.
AMANDA: I have an online coaching service for runners of all abilities and personal coaching for runners in the San Antonio area. I coach athletes from all over the world which is really exciting. I have runners doing everything from 5K’s to Marathon De Sable to the Leadville 100 to the Boston Marathon. It’s great to have a job that I love! My web site (www.amandamcintosh.com) is up but currently under construction, so athletes interested in my coaching services can contact me at coachamanda@earthlink. net. I also coach runners and young
athletes at Saint Mary’s Hall (high school) where I work as a coach and PE teacher.
STEVE: Since you’ve personally been through a diffcult situation/period regarding injuries, what advice and suggestions would you give to an athlete struggling with injuries?
AMANDA: I think the biggest issue for me was that most of my life involves running. It’s my passion, my stress relief, and of course, my job. So, when I was faced with the possibility of not running again it was pretty diffcult not to get down about it. I went through several months of being pretty miserable before I found some alternatives like yoga and core training. The experience taught me to live everyday and do what I love as well as explore other options.
I also have a great support system in my friends, family, and kids. I think that is key. When others continue to believe in you it helps you to get back up and keep trying!
STEVE: What advice would you give to someone just starting to do ultras?
AMANDA: Stock up on Hammer products, get a good coach, and get ready to have the time of your life. Ultras take a lot of training time and commitment but it is worth it. The best way is to start slow and work your way up to the high mileage races. Take one step at a time and enjoy the journey. It’s important to build a base of mileage and nutrition. The usual rules for increasing mileage apply to ultra training and it’s a lot like training for a marathon. One difference is multi day long runs. Example: Friday 15, Saturday 30, Sunday 20. This is where is gets tough and when proper nutrition and recovery is crucial.
STEVE: Thanks so much for your time, Amanda; it’s very much appreciated. I know I speak for everyone here at Hammer Nutrition in telling you what an inspiration you are for us and how much we admire you.
Congratulations on all your fantastic accomplishments, and continued best wishes to you for a successful 2008 and beyond!
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Hermosa Tours : Hit the dirt, white glove style : Brian Frank
As we ease out of winter and the earth around us begins to thaw, if you are like us here in Montana, your thoughts are probably turning toward fairer weather and your upcoming season. Your calendar is out and you are plotting the training blocks, long rides, and races that will delineate your spring, summer, and fall. Let me take a moment to encourage you to slot something new into this year’s annual plan: a dedicated cycling camp or vacation. Over the past 12 to 24 months, through my own experience, and those of literally hundreds of Hammer Nutrition clients, I have become increasingly convinced that this immersive experience is one of the best ways to break through your normal routine, learn new skills and training techniques, and re-invigorate your passion for your sport.
Hermosa Tours
Have you ever dreamed of a fantasy cycling vacation that would allow you to ride the world’s best trails, push your riding to the next level, and still return home at the end of it all, relaxed, refreshed, and rejuvenated, as if you’d spent a week poolside at a tropical resort? Have you wanted to sample mile after mile of ribbon singletrack in the deep backcountry, and still fnish the day with a sports massage and a soak in the hot tub? Long-time Hammer Nutrition mountain bike athletes Nate Whitman and Matt McFee shared that same vision and are now making it a reality. We are pleased to support them in the launch of their new venture, Hermosa Tours: Expert Guided Cycling.
Operating out of the mountain biking mecca of Durango, Colorado, the company offers high-end small-group mountain bike tours and camps in
Durango and southwest Colorado, Zion
and southwest Utah, and the Angeles
and Cleveland National Forests in
Southern California. Hammer loyalists
for more than eight years, the pair have
an impressive endurance
background including
racing The Leadville
100, Vision Quest,
and the Great Divide
Race. Their philosophy
as entrepreneurs is
the same as their
approach to endurance
cycling; they pursue
their passion with
uncompromising
attention to detail.
The two saw a void in the market that they believe needed to be flled. “We loved the idea of using expert local guides to access the best trails in a given region. But the existing companies in this space focus almost exclusively on camping-based, point-to-point style touring” explains McFee. “They do a great job with it, but multi-day campsite to campsite riding and sleeping in tents, can leave you pretty beaten down at the end of a week. More importantly, the point-to-point itinerary constrains ride selection to trails that get you from A to B everyday. The absolute best stuff is often missed.”
Whitman adds, “We wanted to go in the complete opposite direction. We created a model that not only brings our clients to the best mountain biking destinations, but also ensures that every single day of the trip is a true crown jewel ride. There are no throw-away days. We combine high-end accommodations, white glove
customer service, and luxurious touches like massage and healthy gourmet meals, to create mountain biking fantasy vacations. Our small group size and high staff ratio (6 to 12 clients with a minimum of 3 guides) allows us to custom tailor the trip to your exact needs on a daily basis. From the moment you step off your plane, every detail is taken care of. You have nothing to do but focus on riding and relaxing.”
Just as I did when I launched Hammer Nutrition more than 20 years ago, the two had a vision and have gone after it full speed ahead. We think they’re on to something here. So much so that we have signed on as a partner. All Hermosa Tours events will feature Hammer Nutrition endurance fuels and recovery products, as well as Globus E-Stim units. And we are busily planning our frst ever Hammer Singletrack Camp for later in 2008, which I am looking forward to attending personally.
Hermosa Tours is now booking its Durango, Zion, and SoCal tours, as well as custom-designed private tours and training camps, on its website at www. hermosatours.net. Or call and speak with them directly at 1-877-ROLL-MTB. Watch their website, as well as www.hammernutrition.com, for more information and dates on the Hammer Singletrack Camp. We at Hammer wish them much success and are proud to have played a role in their cycling pursuits.
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HAMMER BUCK$ : Cash contingency program : Get paid for racing in our clothes!
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RAAM : Race Across America : Steve Born
If you’re not involved in the Race Across America (RAAM) as competitor, crewmember, offcial, or as part of the organization team, it may be easy to think “why are we talking about a race that takes place in mid-June now? It’s only April!” But if you are involved in RAAM in any of the aforementioned capacities, you’ve probably been thinking about the race for many, many months prior to when it actually commences on June 7th for the solo women riders, June 8th for the solo men riders, and June 11th for the riders competing in the team division.
Well, the same is true for us at Hammer Nutrition, which is why we’re writing about this epic race—which celebrates its 27th year in 2008—in this issue of Endurance News. I’m excited to announce that we are once again honored to support the race that Outside Magazine referred to as “the world’s toughest sporting event.”
The solo feld is shaping up nicely, with 24 men and 2 women already signed up. Only one of last year’s Top 10 fnishers, Austria’s Gerhard Gulewicz, has confrmed their entry in this year’s race, which would normally suggest a wide-open race. However, Gulewicz’s 3rd place fnish from last year arguably makes him the favorite for this year’s race, with multiple RAAM fnishers from previous years—Fabio Biasiolo of Italy, David Haase of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and Rob Morlock of New Milford, Connecticut—also in contention for victory.
Also competing this year is Hammer Nutrition-fueled David Jones of Winnetka, California. Last year David set a record in the solo 60+ age category, fnishing in 12 days, 1 hour, 15 minutes, which broke the old record by more than
six hours, and he’s looking to improve upon that this year.
In the women’s solo division, the current favorite appears to be Janet Christiansen of Poway, California, though she’ll be pressed by Canadian Caroline van den Bulk who competed in (but couldn’t fnish) last year’s RAAM. Among Janet’s many accomplishments, she, along with teammate Nicole Honda, won the two-person women’s division in last year’s RAAM, setting a new course record of 8 days, 18 hours, 57 minutes. Janet will be fueling with Hammer Nutrition products in this year’s RAAM.
There are also various multi-rider team divisions in RAAM and there’s a healthy number of the number of teams entered so far:
•      2-Person Team Men – 5 teams
•      2-Person Team Mixed – 1 team
•      4-Person Team Men – 15 teams
•      4-Person Team Women – 3 teams
•      4-Person Team Mixed – 8 teams
•      8-Person Team – 11 teams
At nearly 3015 miles, this year’s RAAM route is approximately 30 miles shorter than last year’s, and begins in Oceanside, California at the Oceanside Pier and fnishes at the City Dock in Annapolis, Maryland. Riders will pass through 14 states across the U.S. – California, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland – to reach the fnish. As you can imagine, every type of terrain and weather condition will be confronted.
Two other events are being run concurrently with this year’s RAAM: the Race Across the West and the 24 Hour Challenge. The Race Across the West is
new this year, the feld will include solo, 2-person, and 4-person teams, and it covers the frst 1000 miles of the RAAM course fnishing in Taos, NM. The 24 Hour Challenge is a team-oriented event (2- and 4-person teams) that covers the frst 500 miles of the RAAM course fnish in Flagstaff, AZ.
RAAM truly is an international race with competitors hailing from Austria, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal, Switzerland, and of course, the United States.
This year’s RAAM, with a good mix of veterans and rookies, looks to be one of the most competitive and interesting races in many years. We at Hammer Nutrition are extremely excited to be involved again this year. You can found out more about RAAM, including continual updates, at www. raceacrossamerica.org
Become a world-famout athlete! : Send copyright-free photos to : anock@hammernutrition.com
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Another surprise ending comes full circle : Tony Schiller
It was a brutal day to race one’s frst half marathon. The early morning air was already hot and sticky with record highs moving in. None of this was lost on the 350 racers. They answered the call to the start line with less urgency than grade school children being beckoned back to class by the bell on the frst perfect day of spring.
While I can now better appreciate the wisdom of their slow saunter to the start, at the time I impetuously cursed them for it. “Come on. You’re holding up the *%#* show.” Already dripping in sweat from the warm-up, I was agitated by the late start which just meant more time on a sizzling road.
Finally, we started and I shot out like a caged lion being released. Leading from the frst step and free and clear of the feld by the 50th, I cruised alone through a 5 minute opening mile and onto a personal record time at 5-miles with not a single challenger in sight. It was there that I took my frst aid of the race – a small Dixie cup of cherry Kool-Aid.
About a mile later I backed off on the pace a bit for no particular reason, just a general sense that it might be a good idea. That coincided with the appearance of a lone fgure giving chase. This caused little concern. All systems were fne and he was still a long ways back. And thanks to the stellar frst half, so much time had been banked that a steady pace the rest of the way would win this thing with time to spare.
The plan was working. The chaser was gaining ground but for him it was looking like too little too late. The lead was still huge at 9 miles where ice cold water was poured over the head and a second 4-ounce cup of red sugar water
was poured down the throat. With the needed fuel for the remaining 20 minutes consumed, it was time to focus on victory.
A disastrous 10th mile changed all that. No, you’re not supposed to look back, but the fear of losing was my motivation. The gap was shrinking fast but still, hopefully, was enough. The next look broke that theory. He was charging. At 11 miles he pulled even saying, “Nice job. Hang with me,” and grabbed a special water bottle someone had set out for him. My attempt to snatch one last Kool-Aid failed and left me coated in red sugar. He offered his bottle but I declined not wanting to try something new in a race (never mind that Kool-Aid wasn’t in my routine).
Running on life support, I somehow stayed on his side long enough to make it to Broadway where we saw the frst spectators of the day. Thousands of people, several rows deep, lined the roadway. Unbeknownst to me, we’d just become benefciaries of a race course staged to fnish at the front end of the town’s 4th of July parade. As the police siren blared and people screamed for the two strangers racing side-by-side for some unknown prize, the quiet little race had morphed into one with a giant stage for one of the most memorable fnish stretches of my life. I found just enough strength to keep elbow to elbow contact, and then with a block to go, found something extra to win it by 2 strides.
In the fnish chute his hands came to rest on my shoulders and I collapsed under their weight. It was he who lifted and dragged me to shelter in the shade of a giant oak tree. When my eyes disappeared into my head and my body went limp, it was he who scampered for emergency help. It was he who stayed by
my side until the ambulance arrived and then throughout the ordeal. And it was his water bottle – and whatever was in it – that fnally made the difference and brought me back from to life.
Most of the runners had fnished and the ice bags surrounding my body had melted by the time he came back to check on me. It was the frst I’d really noticed his face and to my utter dismay I realized the person who’d just raced me to the brink of death was, in fact, an old man. It was revealed to me that he was, shockingly, all of 42 years of age. He told me he just no longer possessed the speed I had used to pull out victory. I was both in disbelief at what he’d accomplished and embarrassed that at 19-years of age, and being a runner on the rise, I almost lost to the old codger.
This summer marks 31 years since that race with Jerry McNeal. I never learned the secret of what was in his bottle but have gladly stumbled on other alternatives to prevent further firtings with ambulance rides. It would be easy to write about the race fueling lessons of that day but I’d rather refect on the impact Jerry had on my life. I left Winona that day admiring him for his enthusiasm and courage to keep going deep and right then decided that that is what racing is all about. It hit me that while we only have a limited time to enjoy our fastest race, if we play our cards right, we have a lifetime of opportunities to have our BEST race.
I still like to think of myself as just another one of the guys at races, but having just reached the milestone of 50, it’s a given that today’s 19-year olds, and most 20-somethings for that matter, pretty much just see an old guy that
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have dropped the project.
New favors
I’m really excited about the new Strawberry Recoverite and the Mild Melon HEED. Mixing the Strawberry Recoverite in vanilla soy milk tastes just like Strawberry Quik® and the Melon favor is just different, refreshing, and good. The additional favors and single serving packets that we are introducing for Hammer Whey, our 100% whey isolate, are going to be really nice in giving you more options for this superior protein.
Camps
I had so much fun doing the training camps in Tucson this past winter. If you were able to attend one of them, I’d like to thank you for coming and tell you how much I enjoyed meeting, riding, and hanging out with you. For those who will be coming to our fall 2008/2009 camps, I’m looking forward to getting to know you too. You can read more about the camps, past and future, on page 24.
New body care products
The new Hammer body care products
have been well received with many of you becoming regular consumers of the Hammer Balm transdermal pain cream. The Cool Feet product has also been getting rave reviews, especially from those with really stinky feet. If you haven’t tried it yet, ask for a free sample on your next order. Both of these products are defnitely here to stay.
Our last addition to the body care line for this year is the Soni-Pure hand sanitizer. While I really like this product, we are going to wait for your feedback before deciding whether to make it a permanent addition or not. We did an initial run of 5,000 samples and a few hundred of the pump bottles to see how you like this product. So, if you are a habitual user of waterless hand sanitizers, I hope you’ll try our natural, alcohol free variation and let us know what you think. Likewise, if you don’t use waterless hand sanitizers because of their chemical ingredients, I hope you’ll try ours and let us know how it works for you. You’ll fnd more information about all three of these products in the body care article on page 16.
EMS
While I have personally been using e-stim, or EMS (electrical muscle
stimulator) technology for nearly 10 years, I continue to be impressed by the variety of situations in which it can provide substantial benefts. If you’ve been intrigued by this product, read more about it on page 48.
Job Posting
In our last issue, I took the unprecedented step of advertising a job opening for our Sponsorship Guru. As expected, we received nearly 100 responses. We have culled through those to come up with a list of about a dozen candidates. Although I originally intended to announce the new person in this issue, I have not been able to make enough time to fnish the process. So, thank you to everyone who applied and I appreciate your patience. I’ll be announcing it here frst when we fll the position.
Ok, that’s all from me for this issue. Thank you for your support and encouragement. Remember, we are here to help you make this your best year ever.
Enjoy the read! Brian Frank Proprietor
they better not lose to. That seems fair. Maybe if I’m lucky, one of them might just think, if he can do it, so can I. That’d be pretty cool.
As for Jerry, the collective toll of too many running miles without much cross training eventually caught up to him and forced his early retirement. He misses racing dearly. It’s an important reminder for all of us to never take for granted, not event for a second, how much racing adds to our life. Every single day pay attention to your body. Listen when it calls for rest. Find balance by adding more fexibility and strength training and bringing more variety to your routines. You have only one vessel. Take care of it. We’ll see you at the races.
Tony Schiller is 50 – watch out young guys.
Tony Schiller is a corporate motivational speaker, race director, and coach. In 2007, he won the men’s 45-49 title at the USA Triathlon nationals. He’ll go after the 50+ world title this June in Vancouver.
Perpetuem : THE fuel for extreme endurance
HOT TIPS : Mixing suggestions for making concentrated Perpetuem for consumption from a flask
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Folic Acid : Does supplementation create an increased risk for colon cancer? : Steve Born
The headline of a popular medical e-newsletter (WebMD) dated June 5, 2007 reads, “Popular Folic Acid Supplements Don’t Lower—But May Raise—Cancer Risk, Study Shows.” A news service (FoxNews.com) release covering the same study had this similar headline, “High Doses of Folic Acid May Increase Colon Cancer Risk,” and continued,
High doses of folic acid do not prevent precancerous colon polyps in people prone to them and may actually increase the risk of developing the growths, a new study fnds. It’s the latest evidence that taking too many vitamins may be harmful.
The article then lists a few studies that I won’t get distracted with now, but the main point here is obvious: What supplement user wouldn’t be more than a little concerned? How many would be thinking, “Uh oh. Am I putting myself at risk by supplementing with this B vitamin?” As most of our clients know, Premium Insurance Caps contain folic acid (400 mcg per 7-capsule packet), and it’s also one of the two ingredients in Xobaline (800 mcg per sublingual tablet).
Is the headline accurate? Technically, yes, due to the word “may,” but that’s not the point. How many people will read that headline and think, “Folic acid is a risk factor for cancer!” Obviously there’s no news of great interest in inconclusive studies, so if a news source wants to get read, it has to make some newsworthy claim, even if the headline doesn’t exactly do justice to the data.
Does folic acid supplement really increase the risk for developing colon cancer, or is this just journalistic hype?
To answer that question we need to look at the study, or even just read further down in the text of the news releases to fnd out the whole story. A line near the bottom of the Fox story reads, “Researchers did not see any real difference in rates of colon cancer, just in the precancerous colon growths.” That wouldn’t make much of an attention-grabbing headline, would it? Here’s the essential information about folic acid and colon health, but frst a little background on colon polyps is in order…
Colon polyps are not cancerous, but they can develop into tumors after many years. The term “precancerous” does not mean the polyp will become cancerous, it just means that it could become cancerous. Many people have polyps, and most will never have colon cancer. Very few polyps eventually become cancerous; however, it only takes one to go bad and deal you a case of colon cancer, so it’s a good idea to fnd out if you do have them, especially if you have a family history of colon cancer. Hammer clients will have few risk factors for colon polyps/cancer, which include smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and low intake of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. However, training ten or more hours a week and eating healthy won’t change your genetics. Anyone can have polyps, and they should be removed regardless of other factors. Routine colonoscopy locates and removes polyps; this should defnitely be on your agenda if you’re 50 or better.
The study involved about 1000 men and women who previously had colon polyps removed during colonoscopy. The researchers wanted to fnd out if high-dosage folic acid would prevent regrowth of the polyps. In this study, participants
were given either 1 mg (1,000 mcg) of folic acid or a placebo. They also took aspirin (in either low-dose or regular-dose amounts) or a placebo.
The study results showed that the folic acid did not reduce the number of new polyps; in fact, there was an insignifcant increase in the folic acid group. Subsequent follow-up testing over some years showed a continued increase in new polyps developed by the folic acid group over the placebo group. However, there was no increase in the actual incidence of colon cancer, at least partially due to the fact that colon cancer develops very slowly. (The researchers did fnd an overall cancer increase in the folic acid group, primarily prostate cancer, in men, but this also was statistically insignifcant).
The data collected by the researchers certainly showed that folic acid supplementation failed to reduce the reoccurrence of polyps in this study population. And yes, there were increased polyps in the folic acid group, and yes, polyps can be become cancerous; that’s true enough. But the research failed to show any statistically signifcant link between folic acid consumption and increased polyp recurrence, and it certainly did not establish folic acid as a risk factor for any type of cancer.
I’m not commenting on the validity of the study, but rather how the results are publicized. Headlines such as those listed earlier contribute to inappropriate fear of supplement use. They attract attention where little attention is warranted. These headlines, at least
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on the emotional level, take us beyond the data and into the realm of fear and speculation.
There is also the issue of how far to extrapolate the fndings. The study subjects had a history of colon polyps already at the start. The research tells us that folic acid didn’t prevent regrowth of polyps, but it doesn’t tell us what it does in people without polyps, or in people who do have polyps but lead colon-healthy lifestyles.
If you do have a history of colon polyps or colon cancer, we at Hammer Nutrition suggest that you keep a cautionary, but not reactionary attitude about folic acid. That means that if you want to stay on the ultra-safe side, avoid high-dose (1000 mcg/day) folic acid supplementation. Keep in mind that this recommendation is tentative and subject to controversy until additional studies corroborate or reject high-dose folic acid as a risk factor for colon cancer, or any other pathology for that matter.
Dr. Bill Misner writes, “Folic acid has a clean reputation in terms of disease association. It is completely devoid of adverse effects up to 5,000 mcg (5 mg) per day. The Optimal Daily Allowance (ODA) of Folic Acid (adults) is 800-2,000 mcg/day. Clinical trials therapeutic
dosages (for reversal of symptoms) are:
•      Depression: up to 10,000 mcg (10 mg)/day
•      Neuropathy: up to 15,000 mcg (15 mg)/day
•      Restless Legs Syndrome: up to 15,000 mcg (15 mg)/day
•      Elevated homocysteine: up to 5,000 mcg (5 mg)/day
•      Cervical Dysplasia: up to 5,000 mcg (5 mg)/day
He concludes with the precaution “Epilepsy patients should avoid high dose due to onset of seizures. Persons with low zinc levels should not take excessive doses of folic acid since each inhibits the uptake of the other.”
There is an ongoing debate as to whether or not high-dose folic acid supplementation during the treatment of cancer is appropriate. A large body of research, involving both humans and animals, indicates that folic acid supplementation improves survival, while this latest study suggests that high doses of this B vitamin may proliferate the growth of specifc cancers. However, what the majority of scientists believe, based on existing research, is that high-dose folic acid supplementation
signifcantly lowers the risk of many forms of cancer. That’s the key take­away message here: For healthy people, folic acid supplementation is safe and benefcial.
When you see a scary headline about a supplement, read all the way to the bottom of the article, or study the original research before you toss your bottles in the trash. Selling supplements is indeed our business, but we guarantee you that your health is our prime concern. We keep up with ongoing research, and if we ever learn that any of our components truly turns out to be a villain, we won’t use it. We don’t use artifcial favors and additives for that reason. We don’t use simple sugars for that reason. We don’t use nasty stuff such as stimulants or steroids for that reason.
If we fnd convincing, appropriately applied evidence that any nutrient formulated in any of our products could compromise your health, we’ll give you appropriate use cautions or we’ll eliminate it altogether. We’ll never compromise your health, but we also won’t discontinue a nutrient that boasts a solid resume of health and performance benefts on the basis of meager, suggestive evidence.
HOT TIPS : More benefits from folic acid
Xobaline : Supplement with folic acid
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Nate's Corner : Late Llerandi
Note: Per usual, even though this “Tip of the Day” information from longtime sponsored athlete/coach Nate Llerandi is 2-3+ years old, we feel it’s still quite applicable. Enjoy!
Changing of Focus
Now that the racing season is upon us, the focus on your training should be shifting. You either have peaked in your weekly hours or will do so soon, depending on when your key races are.
Also, you will be shifting to more anaerobic work and less aerobic. The majority of your training is still aerobic - 80% or more - but this should be considerably less than during the winter, when maybe 95% was aerobic. With the increase in intensity, there should be a leveling off or decrease in weekly training hours (up to 20%). This decrease in hours compensates for the increase in intensity. If you schedule deliberate recovery weeks every 4th or 5th week, you can get by with more hours and more hard training. If you still don’t include rest weeks of reduced hours (around 50 -60% of normal weeks) and reduced workloads (90-100% aerobic - below 75%), then you should think about it. Nothing derails great ftness like overtraining.
Finally, it’s time to start cutting back on weights. If you’ve been lifting 3 days a week (hopefully not more than that), then it’s time for 2 days. The fall and winter was the time to make gains in your strength. With 2 sessions per
week, you should still make some gains. But you need to reduce the amount of weight work you’re doing now that you’re increasing your intensity in your primary sport(s). Soon, it will be time to reduce your weight routine to once per week, probably in another 4-6 weeks. At that point, the goal is simply to maintain the strength gains you’ve made, not to build on them. Too much weight work will break you down and keep the muscles from recovering properly as the rigors of the racing season pile up.
Go Short
Regardless of the types of races you compete in or their durations, you are constantly presented with a choice - to go short or to go long in your training. Now, realize that in the context of this post, the terms “short” and “long” are relative. For example, a short/long bike ride for an Olympic distance athlete might be 1:30/3:00 while for an Ironman athlete those rides might be 4:00/7:00. And so on.
But, when given the choice of going short or long, it is generally a smarter choice to go short. Yes, going long is important within the context of your training to ensure you can handle the various rigors your key races will demand of you. But, week in, week out, going short is the key to prolonged progress and success.
It is a common held myth that the majority of sports-related injuries occur from high-intensity training. In fact, most injuries occur from overuse syndrome... in other words, from going long too often. When we go long, biomechanically our bodies break down as we fatigue. This leads to the practice of a lot of improper form, which in turn can lead to injury. By going short, you can avoid a lot of the improper
biomechanical problems and, thus, have a better chance of avoiding injury.
The benefts of going short are many. I’ll outline a few here. First, within any given HR zone you can train faster. For example, you can hold a faster pace during an hour run at 70-78% than you can during a 2-hour run at 70-78%. Or, if you shorten your track workout to a total of 2.5 miles of hard running instead of 4 miles, you’ll be able to run at a faster overall pace. You will be training faster, therefore, during your workouts. This can translate directly into faster racing. Second, you recover more quickly from shorter workouts. Conceivably, you could incorporate more hard days of training into your routine by going short. Within the context of what is rational, the harder you train week in and week out, the faster you become over time. Thirdly, more of your day is freed up for other pursuits. You do not become a slave to the grind, thus allowing yourself to be a more well-rounded individual. This alone presents benefts for your overall life. The more in-balance you are, the more you will fourish in your pursuits. Fourth, as I stated above, your propensity for injuries will be greatly reduced. Sure, injuries can occur at any time in any activity. But the odds will be stacked in your favor by concentrating on doing the minimum training possible to accomplish your goals versus focusing on going long and trying to cram it all in.
Again, the context of “short” and “long” is defned by the type of racing you do. You can’t expect to train 5 hours a week and set the world on fre during a marathon. But does that mean you should train 15 hours a week? I don’t think so. Take a
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Determination : Sean Simonson
Not too long ago we received this awesome testimonial and wanted to share it. Congratulations on your race results Sean!
Sean Simonson’s life changed forever during a routine training ride in April 2006. A rock hidden in the dirt caught his front wheel and fipped him over the handlebars of his mountain bike, breaking his neck and leaving him a quadriplegic. Sean was only able to move his right arm, and his doctors gave him little chance for recovery. Despite this grim prognosis, Sean worked hard in physical therapy every day for months, usually for 5-6 hours each day. Today, Sean has returned to work at the Milpitas Fire Department and is racing in triathlons and marathons, proving that anything is possible.
During the last six months, Sean took frst place at the Stanford Triathlon (“Treeathlon”), second place at the Tinsel Triathlon, frst place at the Surf City Half Marathon, and ffth place at the California International
Marathon. His racing schedule for this year includes competing in the California International Triathlon and San Diego Triathlon Challenge. His goal is to compete in the Paralympic Games. Sean’s motto is “everyday in everyway I get a little better.”
Sean has a very rigorous training schedule that demands exceptional nutrition. With his injury, the quality of the calories he consumes is especially
important. Sean exclusively uses Hammer Nutrition, specifcally the Perpetuem and Recoverite products. He uses Hammer products because the complex carbohydrates digest easily while racing and provide him the energy he needs to race and recover quickly.
good, hard look at your training schedule. Look at every workout for every day of the week. Is every workout necessary? If not, start whittling them away. Then look at the duration of each workout. Are you going to derive extra beneft by completing each workout for the durations you have outlined versus possibly shortening some/all of them? If the answer is “no”, then start trimming the fat off them. You will be surprised at how “bare bones” you can get without
sacrifcing performance in both training and racing.
And, by allowing yourself to be fresher day in, day out and week in, week out, you may also fnd that your performance gets an important booster shot in the arm.
Nate Llerandi is a former national champion class swimmer/world class triathlete. He has been coaching since 1990 and creates programs for athletes of all sports and ability levels. You can contact him at natellerandi@yahoo.com
HOT TIPS : The Importance of Rest
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From the Archives : Bill Misner, Ph.D.
QUESTION : I’ve seen a lot of NO2 supplements on the market, with lots of impressive promises attached to them... is this something I should consider taking?
ANSWER : Using a NO2 supplement is popular among bodybuilders. A number of advertisements profess gains, gains, gains in lean muscle mass, recovery, and increased strength. However profound their claims, NO2 [N(2)O] exposure has been shown to raise homocysteine and lower vitamin B12. This is just the opposite of what the endurance athlete desires. We desire open, clean, homocysteine-free blood vessels, with quality and quantity Red Blood Cells somewhat dependant upon available substantive B12 that can contribute to hematocrit in the 45-50 range. Any form of exposure to NO2 [N(2)O] is
not recommended for my nutritional training table.
Research
In a study involving 95 operating room nurses with a history of exposure to nitrous oxide and 90 unexposed counterparts, results indicate that impaired vitamin B12 status is more prevalent among nurses occupationally exposed to nitrous oxide. Vitamin B12 and Homocysteine (Hcy) were measured in all participants. Subjects exposed to nitrous oxide showed lower vitamin B12 and higher Homocysteine (Hcy) levels than subjects without exposure to nitrous oxide. Additionally, the decrease in vitamin B12 levels was signifcantly greater in subjects exposed to nitrous oxide in concentrations substantially exceeding occupational exposure limit.
Thus, Krajewski W, Kucharska M, et al, of this 2007 study concluded, “Exposure to N(2)O [nitrous oxide] in healthcare workers is associated with alterations of vitamin B12 metabolic status, the extent of which depends on the level of exposure.
References
Impaired vitamin B12 metabolic status in healthcare workers occupationally exposed to nitrous oxide, Krajewski W, Kucharska M, et al, Br J Anaesth, 2007; 99(6): 812-8.
Bill Misner, Ph.D.
Director of Research & Product Development Emeritus
Hammering in Alaska : Bernice Pierson
We got this ‘race report’ in after the pages were full but I wanted to include it just the same. Like she mentions below, she was able to take her Premium Insurance Caps with her and she told me she also strategically placed her sport top around the cabin so it would be caught on flm. Thanks Bernice!
At the end of 2007, I spent three months living in the wilds of Alaska as a participant on a television show called The Alaska Experiment. It will premier on The Discovery Channel on April 22, 2008. Luckily I was able to take my Hammer Nutrition vitamins with me because my diet was very limited! I really think the vitamins are what got me through the tough months of hard work while living off the land in Alaska. Here’s the website for more info...
HOT TIPS : Mix & match Hammer fuels
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From Soni's Kitchen : Sonia Frank
Healthy Tuna Salad
Ingredients:
1/2 head of lettuce, cleaned and
shredded
8 oz. can red kidney beans, drained
6 oz. can solid white tuna in spring
water, drained
1 carrot, chopped or grated
1/4 cup purple onion, chopped
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 cup cooked red potatoes, diced
1 small tomato, sliced
2 tbsp. low-gat Italian salad dressing 1 hard-boiled egg, diced
Preparation:
Start with a large bowl. Add all in­gredients, except egg, and toss well. Top with egg and fresh pepper. Add croutons or sunglower seeds if de­sired. Makes 2 hearty servings. Add your favorite herbs for extra favor.
Nutritional facts per serving:
Calories 220; Carbohydrates 45g; Fat 4.5g; Protein 33g
Chicken Rice Soup
Ingredients:
12 cups water
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped carrot
2 bay leaves 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp. dried basil leaves 1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper 1 chicken breast, halved & skinned 1/3 cup white rice 1 1/2 cup zucchini or summer squash, chopped 1/2 cup parsley
Preparation:
Combine frst 9 ingredients in large sauce pan. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Add chicken breast and simmer covered for 20 minutes. Remove breast and set aside to cool. Add rice and cook for 15 minutes. Shred chicken meat from bone. Add chicken meat, zucchini and parsley to soup. Bring to a rapid boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat. Serve, adding salt and pepper to suit your taste. Makes about 8 servings.
Nutritional facts per serving: Calories 78; Carbohydrates 9g; Fat 0.6g; Protein 8g
Honey Sesame Dressing
Ingredients:
3/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
1 1/2 tbsp. honey 1/2 cup light vegetable oil 1/4 cup sesame oil
2 cloves garlic, minced 1 1/2 tsp. sesame seeds 1 tsp. soy sauce Juice from half a lemon, strained
Preparation:
Combine all ingredients in a container with a secure lid. Shake well and refrigerate overnight. Use as a salad dressing or marinade. Makes about 16 oz.
Nutritional facts per tablespoon: Calories 65.5; Carbohydrates 14g; Fat 1.7g; Protein 0g
Endurance Nutrition DVD : A proper diet is critical to athletic performance!
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Ten steps on the endurance path : Prescription for a long life on the long road : Chris Kostman
For twenty-fve years, I have seen people get into endurance sports, quickly make the jump into ultra-distance events and training, then pile on the miles and the fnish lines, only to wind up back on the couch, never to be seen again within a few short years. That’s a long sentence describing a short career as an endurance athlete. Don’t let this be you! Whether you are fresh out of college (or high school) or an empty-nester looking for a new challenge, developing as an endurance athlete takes several years to learn the path and a lifetime to master it.
Step One: Don’t Be A Burnout
There’s no better way to get sick of something than to do it too much, too hard, and too often, to the exclusion of other pursuits and activities. Yes, endurance sports require time and commitment, but they do NOT require that one take on the monastic or ascetic life. Regardless of the age at which you start in the sport, take your time and don’t hurry things. There’s no need to do several marathons in your frst year of running, or even in the second or third year. Likewise for competing in ultras, adventure races, triathlons, endurance cycling events, and such. A few solid years of 10ks, half-marathons, training with a club, and exploring what the sport of running has to offer will serve you well in the long run. The same goes for other endurance sports. Building layer upon layer of quality training, quality rest, quality information-seeking, and quality experience is an integral part of a healthy, fulflling, balanced lifestyle. With that approach, you’ll be rolling and running across fnish lines for many decades to come!
Step Two: Progress, Intelligently Planned
One of the beauties of endurance sports is that the various events are measured in specifc and consistent distance or time increments. This creates a simple, logical, and smart path for progressing through a season and through a career. Thus 5Ks lead to 10Ks and half-marathons lead to marathons. Beyond that, 50Ks lead to 50-milers, 100Ks to 100-milers, and out there in terra incognito are the 24­hour races and 135-mile events like the Badwater Ultramarathon. In cycling, 50-milers lead to centuries, which lead to double centuries, which lead into 24-hour and 500+ mile races. Similar distance progression exists in triathlon, adventure racing, swimming, and other endurance sports.
When I frst got into long-distance cycling in the early 80s, my theory was that one can always race twice as far as one has gone before – and this proved true for me over time in cycling as well as in running, snowshoeing, and triathlon. But while it can be reasonable to jump from half- to full-marathon, or from 50 miles to 100 miles with many sound weeks or months of training in between, running requires adaptation to the pounding of the pavement. This requires, for most, training runs at 80% or more of the intended race distance (at least for up to 50-mile events). Cycling is generally less injurious than running, and requires less time to recover, so doubling one’s distance is a bit safer than in running. Use the doubling rule of thumb cautiously, over time, and you’ll fnd ever further horizons still within your reach.
Step Three: Think and Live Seasonally
It is impossible to maintain maximum ftness year-round, year after year.
That’s the fallacy of the “full-time ftness professional.” That’s also why top endurance athletes build their seasons (years) around one or a few key events and vary their training in cycles of weeks or months to reach their peak ftness when those events happen, a system called periodization. There are many reasons such an approach is benefcial and productive: Each cycle brings new challenges, and rewards, to you. Then the next cycle builds upon the one before to make you better, faster, stronger, and hopefully happier. Importantly, at season’s end, you can take a break physically, emotionally, and otherwise to recharge your batteries. (Just don’t get fat in winter.)
Step Four: Don’t Skip the Speedwork
One common endurance training mistake is just “putting in the miles.” The mentality is that if you put enough miles in the bank in your training, you can withdraw them later as endurance, maybe even as miraculously fast endurance. But this approach is boring, a waste of time, and won’t make you substantially faster.
Simply put, you only get faster by training faster! In practical terms, for cycling, running, swimming, and other endurance path sports, you need one or two days a week focused on high intensity speed training. Though solo hill repeats or intervals against the clock can be effective speed training, the best way to increase your speed is to swim, bike, or run with those who are faster than you are. For running, join a coached track workout at least once a week. (If none are available, fnd some fast runners to meet weekly.) The coaching you’ll get on your form, posture, and
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other subtleties is another great bonus of group workouts. Ditto for joining a master’s swim workout program. For cycling, join a true “racing club” on at least one smoking fast training session per week. (If you’re really lucky, you live near a velodrome and can join a program there.) Be forewarned, though: it can be humbling for a while, if not for a long while. But you’ll get faster, and stronger, for the long haul.
Step Five: Chill, Would Ya’?
There’s no need to adopt Olympic Team
training methods in order to have a
fulflling life on the
endurance path.
Time and again, I see
athletes taking things
WAY too seriously,
downloading every
workout into their
computer for scrutiny,
stepping on the scale
every day, keeping
mammoth training
logs, undergoing
extremely detailed
– and extremely
expensive –
ftness tests, and
never missing a
workout under any
circumstances.
Most egregiously,
most athletes do
the same workout, or route, on the
same day of the week, week after week,
year-round. I say, “BORING!!” Where’s
the adventure in that? How does that
develop adaptability? Where’s the
challenge, the taste for the unknown?
Life on the endurance path should be
fun, frst and foremost, and should open
up the world in a literally awe-inspiring
way. As long as you get in the variety
and intensity of necessary training, it
really doesn’t matter which workout you
do on any given day. Remember, though:
don’t skip training days during the week
with the intention of making up for it on
the weekends. On a consistent, regular
basis, use your sport for exploring the
inner and outer universes, as a tool
for self-discovery, for exploring all the
geography of your life. Bring diversity
- and a relaxed sense of fun - to the
endurance path and it will bring you
a wide panorama of experiences AND
greater ftness.
Step Six: No More SLOW Distance
In my humble opinion, “LSD” does not stand for “Long Slow Distance,” it stands for “Long Steady Distance.” There is a difference. LSD runs, rides, and swims will allow you to slowly, but surely, rebuild your body from the inside out. You’ll increase the effciency of your cardiovascular system and get in touch with your heartrate and breathing patterns. This is particularly important in the early season, when you’re laying the foundation for the year. Most importantly, don’t confuse “steady” for “slow” and just put in the long miles at an easy intensity. This is a waste of time because the only thing accomplished physiologically by running, cycling, or swimming slowly is learning how to run, bike, or swim slowly. In reality, only a moderate amount of long-distance training is necessary to train for endurance races (mainly to test nutritional programs and to see how your body and mind respond to long hours or big miles.) But while you’re putting in those long miles, do so at a good, steady intensity with occasional bursts of power over hills or while “play-racing” your friends. Use your heart rate monitor to see how low you can keep your heart rate while maintaining a challenging average speed. Just don’t waste your time going slowly!
Step Seven: Don’t Dilly-Dally, but Do Smell the Roses
Life is short, so “Keep it steady and keep it moving” should be the mantra while training or racing. Don’t dilly-dally while refueling, tending to blisters, or reading a map. Don’t bog down your pace, cadence, or foot turnover, whether on the hills or fats. (“Lively legs” is the reminder I use.) But, most importantly, do allow yourself the “indulgence” of stopping to enjoy the view along the way.
I mean that literally: when you reach that awesome viewpoint, stop! Check it out! Breathe it in! Stretch out your body for a minute! Enjoy the moment! If you’re only going to stare at the trail or road right in front of you, you might as well just run on a treadmill, ride on a trainer, or swim all alone! One of the true joys of life on the endurance path is to appreciate where it leads you, after all, and what that view provides.
Step Eight: Eat Like a Champion
Food and drink choices for the endurance path won’t reveal their effectiveness until you get way “out there.” Use your long training efforts to see which fuel and hydration systems work for you, rather than fnding out the hard way on race day. Whatever you eat and drink, it should be portable, go down well, provide consistent energy (no highs and lows), and keep you hydrated. It should be a system that you have carefully honed and tested in training. Even if drop bag delivery is provided at your intended race, it won’t usually be for all the checkpoints; fnd out what the event promoters will serve and plan accordingly. I once rolled into a checkpoint at a double century and they were serving hot dogs and danishes -that’s it! Most likely you will need to bring and carry most or all of your own powders, gels, and pills. Don’t see that as a hassle, though; it’s your secret weapon! Of course, above and beyond your athletic fuel plan, even more important for a long life on the endurance path is a proper, mindful, healthy diet, 24/7/365.
Step Nine: Recover, Recover, Recover
Give it a rest! The complimentary ideas of “rest days” and “recovery workouts” are lost on far too many athletes of every kind. In training, you’re either improving by pushing yourself or you’re recovering so that you’re ready to push yourself again. Training at a mid-level intensity is only useful during LSD sessions. Each week should include one true recovery workout and one day of light activity. (On a related note, a walk after dinner is a good habit every day.) If you’re not recovered, your resting heart rate will be elevated and/or you’ll feel listless during your workout. If that’s you, rest another
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Butterfield 200 : Suzy Degazon
Here I am writing a race report which nearly did not happen, so I will begin by dedicating this 200-mile event to my mother-in-law, Virginia Wiscovitch, who passed away Friday evening.
The alarm went off at 4:00 am and I had been blessed with two hours sleep after spending Friday evening with my husband Al at the hospital paying our respects to his mom who had passed away. I felt awful, it had been quite an emotionally charged evening, and I also had a toothache. Al had prepared my bike and I was set; I traveled to Irvine with Bruce (an excellent ultra cyclist) and arrived at the La Quinta Inn at 5:15 am.
I signed in and picked up my route sheet and my race number. I saw a lot of familiar faces as this would be my 4th double century. I didn’t have enough sleep and I knew it. I had prepared a six hour bottle of Perpetuem (with extra in a plastic bag) and had plenty of Endurolytes. It was freezing and I had stupidly not arrived prepared so Bruce gave me a skull cap to wear and I also borrowed an undershirt. This was going to be a long day.
At 6:15 am a huge crowd of ultra cyclists headed out of the Inn, (there was 189 registered riders and 158 who fnished it!) it was a new route for 2008 and we began with what seemed like a zillion stoplights. Soon the group became divided as the faster cyclists made the green lights and the slower ones hit the red.
For the frst 39 miles I felt miserable! Lack of sleep coupled with feeling guilty for doing the ride, and a toothache all seemed to haunt me. My fngers were tingling with the cold, my nose was running, my feet were numb, and
then there was Brent, who kept up the cheerful banter shouting: “Hammer, hammer Suzy, put down the hammer!!” He certainly made me smile and very soon with a few short climbs in the mix and a view of the ocean I was feeling better. At mile 39 I saw my friend Tammy who has MS and is blind in her left eye. She was also feeling the cold and her MS was not helping her today, but her determination to fght her ailment makes her a winner in my eyes everytime.
At the beginning, every cyclist received a route map. I usually try to follow a group of cyclists going at a good clip but I had missed the chance to do so by being so sluggish in the early morning. I found I needed to learn to read the route sheet alone. Thank goodness for my Polar CS600 giving me the miles and other helpful information.
The organization, Planet Ultra, had excellent aid stations. I could refuel with Endurolytes, plenty of water, Hammer Gel, and Sustained Energy. I decided to stick with Perpetuem as I like the dreamy orange creamsicle favor! At mile 87 there were sandwiches and drinks available and it was tempting to throw in the towel and go home. I called my husband and everything was okay back home so I was good to continue.
The next 100 miles or so were when the real cycling began. A few nice hill climbs and fast descents certainly spiced things up. I managed to get lost for what seemed like 30 minutes as I mis-read the directions. Finally on the right route, with daylight quickly fading, I joined a group of cyclists who were familiar with the route.
The last aid station appeared, which
meant that I had completed 167.5 miles. I had stayed well hydrated and did not want to linger too long next to the warm heater they had going...only 30 some miles to go! I set off into Trabuco Canyon where it was pitch black and the road was a narrow uphill climb. I was a little spooked as it was like cycling in ink. I kept thinking of wild animals attacking me or a crazy person stopping their car to steal my beautiful Cannondale bike and Spinergy wheels! I had 12 miles in this canyon and I would still be there if a cyclist had not whizzed past me full of energy. I felt like the Energizer Bunny after being recharged! I immediately chased after him...forget the cold and darkness, this was fun. As I caught up he shouted “Let’s get them!” He was referring to the red back-lights blinking in front of us. We began overtaking cyclists on our way to the fnish and soon the La Quinta Inn was in sight.
My time will not go in the history books, 14 hours and 57 minutes, my slowest to date, but considering my lack of sleep and personal issues it was a decent time. My friend Tammy would have to wait another day to complete her second double as her MS decided it would not allow her to cycle beyond 62 miles.
I would like to thank my husband for letting me do the ride; I did raise $1,400 for cancer through AVON of Puerto Rico for completing this double century, and Bruce for carpooling with me.
I would also like to thank Hammer Nutrition, Cannondale, Spinergy Wheels, Serfas Tires, Profle Design, Rudy Project, Fuel Belt , Polar Monitors USA, Kool n Fit & Energizer for their help and support.
Suzy Degazon Ultra WOman!
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Pearls of wisdom for Dr. Bill
The HOTTEST TIP : Elevating hGH while you sleep revisited
Between 1996-2008, I reviewed both Certifcates of Analysis from manufacturers of Hammer Nutrition products and independant lab analysis that confrmed manufacturer’s Certifcate of Analysis.
Whether the Certifcates of Analysis’ or independant lab analysis’ level of detection limit was set at PPM parts per million or PPB parts per billion, all confrmed each product contained only the ingredients listed on the label plus 1-4% above the listed amounts described on the ingredients list. No Hammer Nutrition supplement ever tested contained any banned substance, including FDA prohibited substances.
Bill Misner, Ph.D.
AAMA Board Certifed Alternative Medicine Practitioner
Certifcation #38272409
day; training on tired legs is a waste of time. Make your training time count, but also make your recovery time count. The point is to keep building, ever higher!
Step Ten: Do Something Else
I harp on this all the time, but it’s always worth repeating: DON’T JUST DO YOUR MAIN SPORT! Spending 90% of your time doing the sport you know and love is called training your strengths and that’s no way to become a better endurance athlete. Let’s say your main sport is road running: your endurance path could - should, I’d say - also include yoga, Pilates, spinning classes, the weight room, the pool, cycling, and running trails.
Frankly, I’m amazed at the number of overweight endurance athletes I see. Either the extra weight is a result of poor dietary habits (fast food for breakfast, lunch, and/or dinner) or these athletes are stuck on a plateau: no matter how many miles they train, or how many long events they fnish, they never really get into shape, or better shape. They need to incorporate more intensity into their training and they need some serious
cross-training to shock their bodies into pushing itself to a higher level. (So do the rest of us!)
Think of cross-training as flling in the blanks that are left by the huge volume of sports-specifc training done while doing your main sport. Cross-training will not only increase your overall health, but also your sports-specifc athletic ability through increased muscular endurance and strength and elevated joint, muscle, and connective tissue health.
If you want to be running 50-milers for the next 50 years, or riding centuries until you’re 100, then create and follow the endurance path that will get you there. See you along the way!
Chris Kostman has lived on the endurance path since 1982. Besides competing in races as diverse as the Race Across America, the Triple Ironman, and the 100-mile Iditasport Snowshoe Race, he also organizes endurance events such as the Badwater Ultramarathon and Furnace Creek 508. This is his third article for Endurance News. More info at www.adventurecorps.com.
Hammer Whey : Powerful Protein
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Globus Pad Placement Explained : Giovanni Ciriani
Pad placement is very important for effective EMS training. Understanding a couple of principles will help with pad positioning for any muscle. The main points to keep in mind are:
•      Position relative to the muscle anatomy;
•      Direction between pads;
•      Size of pads.
•      Polarity in my opinion, and that of several respected researchers, is not important.
Position
One pad goes on the belly of the muscle. This is also called the active pad, and the belly of the muscle coincides with the motor point, i.e. the point where the innervation arrives into the muscle. For example, on the vastus lateralis, i.e. the outside part of the quadriceps, the belly is the bulging in your muscle, several inches away from your knee.
The other pad, called the inactive pad, goes on the proximal end of the muscle. This is the side of the muscle closer to its innervations, i.e. closer to your head. You want the pad to remain on the feshy part of the muscle; you don’t want this pad on the tendon, it’s better to err on
the side of the muscle. For the outside quad, this is a couple of inches below the groin line, on the outside part of your thigh. To understand these positions fex your muscle and use an anatomy chart .
Double-Input Pads
It’s up to you whether to use standard one-input pads, or double-input pads. There are pros and cons on the use of both: double-input pads are faster to apply, and may save you money; single input pads can be positioned more precisely on the muscle you want to stimulate.
Direction
The imaginary line connecting the center of one pad to the center of the other pad has to follow more or less the direction of the muscle fbers. This is, generally speaking, the direction along which a muscle does its pulling. If the current closes its circuit along many innervations and fbers, the current will encounter less resistance in its path, and you will obtain a stronger contraction.
Size
One school of thought advocates pads
as large as they can ft in a particular body area: this helps distribute current into the muscle and help obtain a higher comfort level. The other school of thought recommends a smaller pad on the belly of the muscle, to help concentrate the current and go deeper into the muscle. However, the depth improvement may be marginal and it’s best to see what works for you.
Polarity
Most pad placement pictures were created for the physiotherapist community, which sometimes uses protocols that give a stronger jolt in one direction. However, the current generated by modern EMS devices like the Globus Premium Sport and Fitness is alternate and symmetrical: by defnition pads become alternatively positive and negative. To convince yourself, pause your EMS session in the middle of it, switch the leads, and then resume: no difference in contraction.
A longer version of this article can be found on Globus Sport and Health Technologies site at http://www.globussht. com/home27 The ideas expressed in this article refect the opinions of the author, and should not be construed as prescription of medical or therapeutic nature by Globus Sport & Health Technologies. (C) 2008 Globus Sport and Health Technologies LLC.
Real athletes, real results!
“Thank you for introducing me to the e-stim device. I had been using it to get ready for the California International Marathon. It was the best marathon I have run, thanks to my unit (and of course my Hammer Nutrition products!!). I have run much faster marathons going back 32 years, but technically this was the best ever: I kept my HR pegged at 85%, my pre-race goal, and I kept good form the entire race. My legs never felt so good. Today I can hardly feel the effects of the race; I even rode my bike to work! And I qualifed for Boston again!”
Fred Goss
“I employed EMS while training for the New York City marathon and loved the device so much, I ended up buying it. It’s done EVERYTHING that Hammer has said it would do. Every marathon training cycle that I had gone through before, I was plagued with injury at some point - not this time while using e-stim.”
Dustin Holmes
“I have absolutely loved this thing ever since I got it... best $600 I’ve ever spent since I’ll save a ton on PT appointments and massages!” Amy Welty
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Read what athletes just like you are saying about their e-stim devices.
“For the frst 50,000 miles of my running career, I was able to run through every single cramp. So when my calves felt tight while jogging before a spring 2004 speed session, I stretched well and as always started the workout. During the frst stride the left calf, then the right, seized in excruciating pain and it was all I could do to walk the mile home. Racing took a back seat to this “injury” and the rest of that year and well into the next, despite all the therapy, was largely a washout as the fare-ups became routine. Finally, I skeptically bought an E-Stim machine fguring what do I have to lose? As it turned out, only the golf-ball sized knots in my calves. Within 3 treatments, they were down to grape-sized, and within a month were virtually gone, and with regular e-stim sessions, they’ve never returned. If you are suffering from a similarly pesky condition, especially in the calves where reduced circulation is a reality for many aging athletes, I strongly urge you to give the E-Stim a try. The Active Recovery program alone is worth the price.”
Tony Schiller
9 time Age Group National Champion
5 time Age Group World Champion
Try Globus in the comfort of your own home...order today!
“I bought my EMS unit from Hammer Nutrition about two years ago based solely on their recommendation and have been a very consistent, satisfed user ever since. Recently, I wasn’t able to do my normal e-stim strength and recovery sessions for several weeks.
Interestingly, NOT having access to my regular e-stim sessions allowed me to fully appreciate all of it’s benefts. Typically, I use Active Recovery daily and after just a few days of not being able to do it, my legs started feeling stale and heavy. I went and got a couple of massages and realized just how much money I’ve saved on massages alone. Over the last 2 years I would have spent over $2,000 on massages, so the Active Recovery program alone saved me $1,350 or more!
Since I couldn’t e-stim, I decided to start going to the gym for lower body strength training. In addition to the extra time going back and forth and the expense, I started to notice joint pain. I realize now that when using e-stim, I get much stronger muscular contractions, yet don’t expose my joints to injury. Again, amazing.
These past couple of months have proven the huge impact this product has had on getting me closer to my goals and feeling more recovered on a daily basis. In combination with intelligent sport specifc training, good diet, and nutritional supplementation, I think EMS is essential equipment.”
Steve Kaplan
Get the Globus advantage today!
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Beyond Iron Distance
As we begin to experience a level of mastery at a particular triathlon race distance, we have two choices to further challenge ourselves within the world of swim-bike-run: We can go faster. Or, we can go farther. Ironman has long been revered as the pinnacle distance of our sport. Once an athlete fnishes an Ironman, the only option is to go faster, yes?
Many Iron triathletes are just discovering that there are indeed races longer than 140.6 miles. In 2007, Ian Adamson offered the 2nd annual 24 Hours of Triathlon in Denver over Labor Day weekend. Steve Kirby produced the annual Virginia Double and Triple Iron triathlons [Steve’s Note: These are Hammer Nutrition sponsored events] in Lake Anna, Virginia over Columbus Day weekend. (The Double began in Alabama in 1985, moved to Lake Anna in 1997, and was joined by the Triple in 1998.) Jane Bockus directed the 23rd Hawaii Ultraman World Championship over Thanksgiving weekend. And, if none of these events are long enough to get you warmed up, you can try your hand (and your arms and legs) at a deca-iron. (Yup, that’s 10 times iron-distance.) Two formats have been used for deca’s: 1) Swim 24 miles, bike 1120 miles, and run 262 miles. 2) Do one iron-distance race each day for 10 days consecutively. The Deca Iron World Championship was held in Mexico City in November 2007, using the second format. (For more information, see the sidebar “Ultra-Triathlon Race Formats”).
Welcome to the “squirrel cage”! With the exception of Ultraman, most ultra-triathlons are “squirrel cage races”. They consist of multiple swim, bike, and run laps, over a short, gently rolling or fat course. For instance, the Virginia
Double Iron consists of 12 out-and-back swim laps, followed by 45 out-and-back bike laps and 26 out-and-back run laps. The Triple Iron, which starts 24 hours earlier than the Double, consists of 18 swim, 67.5 bike, and 39 run laps over the same course. You might think such a short course for such long races would make a multi-day race monotonous. However, the Lake Anna course is quite beautiful, on quiet roads in a state park. The short out-and-back repetitions allow each athlete to return to the race center every 20-60 minutes, with access to his/her “pit area” for food, clothing, equipment changes, and crew support. This frequent “check-in” offers a sense of security, as the athlete endures such a daunting task. Unlike most conventional races on longer courses, ultra-triathlons allow pacers to accompany athletes. The short laps make it easy for spouses and other crew members to take turns accompanying their athletes.
Over multiple laps, the athlete gains intimate familiarity with the course, honing a perfect strategy for the greatest effciency and economy. The age-old expression, “Practice makes perfect” really holds true for such courses, where triple-iron athletes typically spend 20-30 hours just to cover the 336 miles of the bike leg. Short lap lengths also mean the athlete has an accurate, continuous measure of progress.
Why? Why would anyone want to do an endurance event longer than an Ironman? What new discoveries or experiences are there beyond iron? What about the time commitment? If you max your weekly training at 20 hours for Iron-distance, do you max at 40 hours a week for a double-iron, or 60 hours for a triple? How can you train most effectively for ultra-tri’s and still have
a life? What’s the real secret behind training for longer distances?
Well? Are you ready to venture further into the intriguing landscape of physical and mental endurance?
How? In my limited experience, once the muscular, metabolic, and neurological systems are adapted to iron-distances, it is possible to sustain aerobic exercise for much longer duration, without an increase in training volume, if three criteria are met: 1) I have a simple nutrition protocol for continuous fueling. 2) I remain patient and calm enough to regulate a sustainable pace appropriate for the duration. 3) I focus relentlessly on executing each and every stroke and stride effciently, economically, and gracefully. In reverse order, let’s consider each of these criteria.
Focus: The big secret behind training and racing longer distances without devoting every waking moment to training is very simple, yet very subtle. There is a shift in emphasis from sheer volume of physical training to mindfulness training. In Buddhism, mindfulness is the frst of seven factors for enlightenment. Jack Kornfeld describes it very simply in “Seeking the Heart of Wisdom” as “a clear awareness of what is happening each moment”. For endurance athletes, this translates to a capacity to remain present and focused in the “here and now,” in order to swim, bike, and run with biomechanical effciency and economy even under duress, for the duration of the workout or the race. Mindfulness is the foundation for every quality workout, regardless of duration. It includes our concentration

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and kinetic awareness.
With mindfulness, we swim, bike, and run more intelligently. An intelligent, mindful approach is evermore crucial as the distance increases. Each moment of training and racing becomes an intense investigation of effciency, economy, grace, and harmony. Go faster and farther with less effort and energy. Recover faster and minimize incurrence of injury. These are primary intentions that all endurance athletes share, from sprint to ultra.
Mindfulness is simple, and it’s profoundly powerful in all aspects of life. Yet, it is also intangible and hard to measure, so an athletic pursuit of mindfulness can be illusive. It’s not something we can buy in a bottle and drink. However, as the hours and the miles add up over a long training session or an ultra race, the logical mind begins to soften and melt down. Unencumbered by that incessant internal commentary, it gets easier to enter the zone of clear awareness, to fnd the fow.
The most important guideline for combining mindfulness and endurance training is to approach each session with all the diligence and awareness you can muster – as if this will be the last time you will ever swim, bike, or run. Absorb every moment and every detail of your movement. There is no limit to your capacity for diligence and awareness, no limit to your capacity to execute each stroke and stride perfectly.
Technique – A Relentless Pursuit: Swimming is the discipline that really shows us the precedence of perfect technique over desperate exertion. Great swimmers seem to slide through the water without much movement or effort. However, as an
illustration for using mindfulness to survive an ultra triathlon, let’s consider cycling. When I began the 224-mile bike leg of the 2007 Virginia Double, I had never in my life biked more than 171 miles in a single ride, and that was at Ultraman, 11 months prior. In the preceding 2 months, since Ironman Lake Placid, I had not ridden longer than 3 hours continuously. I had to approach the Double Iron bike ride with more effciency and economy than ever before. Do or die, this would be a relentless pursuit of perfect technique. (Nothing like high stakes to perk up the concentration).
My focal points included joint alignment (of the hip, knee, ankle, and foot) and pelvic orientation for correct biomechanics. I also focused on keeping my shoulders low and relaxed, tucking my chin, lengthening the back of my neck and leading with the crown of my head. I continually kept this focus in both aero and upright positions. I was very concerned with saddle discomfort during the 15-hour ride and knew that the best way to avoid it was through diligent saddle positioning that minimized side-to-side movement and the chaffng it causes. (I had brought an ISM saddle on a separate seatpost, in case I felt the need to change saddles. However, I stayed with my Fizik Arione Tri saddle for the duration). I opted for tri shorts with minimal padding and minimal bulk, over bike shorts, for the entire ride.
I also focused on maintaining a cadence of 80-95 rpm throughout the ride, mindful to shift gears accordingly. After the frst 5 laps or so, I had determined the best gear selection, cadence, and positioning strategy for every part of the short course. I rarely rode out of the saddle except to stretch as I coasted downhill, opting to conserve my leg
strength. Overall, I maintained a harmonious and symbiotic relationship with my bike, maintaining correct biomechanics and constantly exercising my “vocabulary” of riding positions.
The most diffcult element of the bike segment was navigating the stretch of road closest to the transition area after nightfall, as we were sharing this section with runners. I constantly reminded myself that these runners were doing the Triple, and were enduring their second night without sleep. Many were in a state of trance that deserved a wide berth. Each cyclist and runner had a headlight/lamp. Depth perception was diffcult, so I exercised patience and caution, keeping the speed conservative throughout this section of the course.
Patient Pacing: A second precious virtue for endeavors of this length is patience. It allows the ultra-athlete to remain in the present moment, without any mental “squirming” that can cause disassociation. Patience is most essential in determining a pacing strategy that is gentle enough to prevent injuries, yet focused enough to cover the distance in the allotted time. With patience, the athlete is less anxious to “hurry up and get this thing over with!” (Maybe this is why the majority of ultra-triathletes are in their 40’s and 50’s). In my experience, I use a combination of mindfulness and patience to gradually and gracefully click off the laps. For setting the pace on both bike and run, I focus on minimizing the perceived strain and impact to my hip, knee, and ankle joints, as well as my feet. I really enjoy the gentleness of this pacing strategy and I’m happy to sustain it for many hours.
Simple Nutrition: For the Double,
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I used the same nutrition strategy I’ve used in the past for ultra races: I refrained from eating anything on race morning until 5 or 10 minutes before I began. I consumed one Hammer Gel before the start. For the remainder of the race, I consumed 2 to 2.5 scoops of Hammer Perpetuem per hour (even during the 4.8-mile swim), along with water and Hammer Endurolytes appropriate for the climate conditions. Hammer Nutrition supplied HEED and Endurolytes that were available at the transition area and the run turnaround. On the second day, as the weather got hot on the run, I opted for Heed over Perpetuem. This simple strategy works very well for me – no fber to process, a steady and even fow of complex carbohydrates with some soy protein, and electrolytes. It is a protocol simple enough for any crew member to anticipate and follow.
I feel that the perceived need for complicated nutrition strategies, with a wide diversity of foods, is more a psychological crutch than a physiological requirement. It is a result of mental “squirming” – the desire to disassociate and to seek out comfort. The consequence is often digestive distress and erratic energy levels. Keep in mind that stored fat is the primary source of fuel for aerobic activity. If the athlete provides an adequate and steady fow of carbohydrate (necessary for converting that stored fat to fuel), as well as electrolytes and water, the body enjoys a continuous level of energy without any gastric complications. The ultra-distance quest is demanding enough; keep the nutrition simple.
Basic Ultra Training Guidelines:
Novice athletes initially realize their greatest advances in endurance as they improve metabolic effciency, training the body to burn fat and to conserve glycogen at higher levels of intensity and for longer durations. As the metabolic system adapts, the advances will level off, with occasional peaks through well-planned periodization. However, given consistent training and a diligent mindful approach, we can continue to improve technique indefnitely as we age. Focus on technique during every workout, whether it is a recovery session or a high-intensity interval session. Relentlessly pursue economy, effciency,
and grace – in the water, on the bike, and on the run.
We train three physiological systems – muscular, metabolic, and neurological. It is the neurological that responds and improves the most, and the muscular that responds the least. However, don’t discount strength training. Functional strength conditioning focuses on training the neuro system to recruit more muscle fbers for a given movement. Improved recruitment means greater endurance capacity with less mileage. Multi-planar exercises that cause you to stabilize joints and maintain balance, will train your neuro-based proprioception – your balance and coordination. Proprioception is a key element for that relentless pursuit of perfect technique. Finally, the pelvic core provides a stable center for all effcient movements – swim, bike, or run. Don’t skimp on functional core strength.
As mentioned above, once you can maintain a training volume for iron-distance, it may not be necessary to increase that for ultra tri’s. Rather, use progressively longer races every 5-8 weeks with adequate recovery in between to build up your metabolic and (more importantly) mental stamina. Alternatively, an epic workout 3-4 weeks prior to an ultra is effective. Instead of chaining yourself to the bike for 14 hours, be creative! I have used two creative approaches with success. One is a “volley” workout, alternating between two disciplines throughout the day. The second alternative works well here in the mountains surrounding Lake Placid: I go for an epic hike with lots of ascents and descents. (These approaches are detailed in the “Case Study” below.)
Finally, don’t let up on the speed work. Obviously, you won’t be doing much sprinting on the bike or run of an ultra-triathlon. However, speed work helps to train your muscle fber recruitment for greater endurance and is essential in that relentless pursuit of perfect technique.
Case Study: For an illustration of the information discussed above, here’s a quick 2.5-month overview of my training and racing leading up to the Virginia Double, 6-7 October. I followed Ironman Lake Placid, 23 July, with active recovery for the frst week – easy swim and bike sessions. I also resumed my
combined core strength and stretching workout (including physio-ball work) three days post-IM, and resistance strength training 10 days later. For speed work, I raced High Peaks Cyclery’s weekly Monday Night Mini-Tri (sprint distance), beginning eight days after.
My immediate race-focus after IM was the USMS National 2-Mile Cable Swim Championship three weeks later. Consequently, most of my high intensity workouts (with the exception of the weekly sprint tri’s) were limited to swimming. Three days before the USMS race, I did an endurance bike-run “volley” in preparation for 24 Hours of Triathlon (24 HOT). The volley consisted of 90 minutes biking/30 run/90 bike/30 run/90 bike/30 run/90 bike. This format closely resembled the strategy I would use for 24 HOT. A few days after the USMS race, I did a similar swim-run “volley”. While these were long sessions, the volley format kept my running legs fresh and recovery times short.
I soloed 24 Hours of Triathlon 1-2 September – fve weeks after IM, and two weeks after USMS. For this race, I alternated between multiple 1-mile swim laps and a single 2.8-mile run lap throughout the day. Although the temperature peaked at 90 degrees, I was back in the water after each 30-minute run to cool off. At night, I alternated between multiple 9.4-mile bike laps and a single run lap. (I never ran more than one run lap at a time throughout the race). This strategy of short run repetitions allowed for greater recovery and minimized injury potential, even though my total run distance was 42 miles. In 24 hours, I completed 15 triathlons, with one additional swim.
I resumed swimming, biking, core strength, and stretching as soon as I returned to Lake Placid. I refrained from running due to a minor injury to my left knee from the 24 HOT. A week after 24 Hours, I signed up for the Virginia Double and I went on a 4-hour fast-hike with friends to the summit of Giant Mountain, here in the Adirondack Park. My legs were very sore for 3 days after the climb, so I ran only twice in that week, 20 minutes each time.
The very next weekend, 5 of us completed a 13.5-hour fast-hike,

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summiting nine of the Adirondack High Peaks, with over 10,200 feet of elevation, covering over 25 miles. (All fve of us had completed Ironman Lake Placid, and all of us agreed this hike left our legs far more trashed). This served as my peak training event for the Virginia Double, three weeks away.
I resumed biking and swimming the next day, but did not run for four days – and then, just 20 minutes. A week after the epic hike, I ran 10 miles. It felt like 20. This was only my fourth run since the 24 Hours, (the frst one longer than 30 minutes), and my longest run before the Double. As mentioned above, my longest bike was three hours. With the exception of our epic hike, my weekly volume between these two long races was moderately low, peaking at a weekly total of 13:45. Regardless, I maintained my relentless pursuit of economy, effciency, and grace in every workout. In addition, twice a week I did my yoga-Pilates core strength and managed a few multi-planar weight lifting sessions as well.
Psychologically, it would have been easy for me to feel anxious about my low training volume as I prepared for the Double, especially running volume. However, a key component of
my endurance athletic training is to disengage from the fear I associate with uncertainty and doubt, especially as I approach a new endurance challenge. This ability to disengage from the fear and befriend the uncertainty as an “elixir of life” is helpful when we approach any new and unfamiliar experience in life. Endurance training and racing provides a great arena for honing this life-skill. Continue to venture forth and explore unfamiliar territory as an athlete and you will continue to hone this skill. I am very grateful for the health, wealth, and the family, community and cultural support that enable me to do this.
In conclusion, the most important preparation for the Double was to arrive at the starting line in a calm state, with humility, gratitude, keen awareness, and lots of patience.
What is possible? One of the greatest psychological supports for me as I “raced” the Double, was sharing the experience with those who began 24 hours earlier, racing the Triple. Their daunting endeavor made my quest look much smaller and more attainable. Most noteworthy was Arthur Puckrin, a 69-year old judge from the UK who took up triathlon at age 50. Wearing his sandals, Arthur was still able to run on Sunday, when the temperature went
over 90 degrees, while I was reduced to a staggering walk. Still smiling and breathing deeply, he gracefully fnished the 78.6-mile run to complete yet another triple-iron with more than an hour to spare. A month later he would begin the Deca World Championship in Mexico City.
Vicenzo Catalano of Italy also completed the triple. He holds the record for the most iron-distance tri’s completed in one year – 40. (Of course, most were accumulated during multiple iron events).
Finally, Guy Rossi of France, age 56, holds the world’s record for the most ultra-tri total mileage. He’s done 9 singles, a 24-hour (that included 8h swim, 8h bike, 8h run), 37 doubles, 27 triples, 1 quadruple, 2 quintuples and 8 deca’s. These accomplishments include 14 podium fnishes. Kinda makes an annual Ironman look like a stroll in the park, huh?
Shane Eversfeld (a.k.a. “Zenman”) is author of “Zendurance, A Spiritual Fitness Guide for Endurance Athletes” as well as founder and head coach of Zendurance Cycling Technique. Please visit his website www.zendurance.net for a complete bio, more info on the book and the tech program, as well as countless essays and blogs.
ULTRA-TRIATHLON RACE FORMATS
Ultraman: Held annually in both Canada and Hawaii, this is a 3-day stage race. The format and distances for this race developed as a way for athletes to circle the entire Big Island, beginning at the pier in Kailua (which also serves as the start of Hawaii Ironman) and ending just a mile away. The frst day includes a 6.2-mile point-to-point swim to Keauhou, followed by a 90-mile bike that fnishes atop 4,000’ Kilauea, just a few miles from the active volcanic cauldera. Day 2 consists of a 171.4-mile bike through countless climatic zones and ecosystems, culminating with a fast descent into Hawi from the 5,000 crest of the Kohala mountains. On Day 3, athletes complete the circle back to Kailua with a double marathon along the same infamous coastal desert highway as the Hawaii Ironman bike course. (Canada Ultraman consists of the same distances.) The entire 320-mile course of both venues is open, with no traffc controls, and each athlete is required to have a support crew. Topography, wind, temperature, and road conditions are highly variable. Athletes must complete each day’s stage within 12 hours. Logistics constitute a crucial element of this race.
24 Hours of Triathlon: With a 2-year history, look for this Le Mans style
format to gain popularity. In 2007, 24HOT was held in Cherry Creek State Park on a 0.25 mile swim, 9.4-mile bike, and 2.8-mile run course, just outside of Denver. The event is open to solo athletes and teams. After the initial swim, bike, and run, athletes may complete legs of the triathlon in any order and combination. However, at the conclusion, placement is fgured by the number of complete triathlons; an excess of bike laps won’t count. Swimming is allowed during daylight hours only. In 2008, the distances for each leg will be standardized to one-tenth of iron distance (0.24-mile swim, 11.2-mile bike, 2.62-mile run). This “go-as-far-as-you-can” format eliminates the distance requirement, meaning that every participant is a fnisher. It’s a great way to break into the ultra-tri arena.
Multiple Iron: These classic “squirrel cage” races have been put on internationally for over 2 decades, including double, triple, quadruple, quintuple, deca., and even 15 times iron distance. In Europe, these races are usually held in well-lit urban areas on fat roads closed to traffc. Course lengths vary by location, however, all of these races consist of multiple laps of a short course. In the US, Huntsville, Alabama was host to the Double 1985-96, before the race moved to Virginia in 1997. The Triple was added in 1998. (For more info: www.usaultratri.com, www. iutasport.com.)
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Maximizing Economy : An essential parameter for triathlon success : Al Lyman, CSCS
Spring has sprung in the northern hemisphere and with it, the time of year when many dedicated triathletes start to really get serious about their training. Whether you are extending the length of your long ride or run in preparation for a mid-season half or full Ironman, or beginning to integrate some track work into your running program to maximize your running speed off the bike for an upcoming sprint or Olympic distance event, chances are that whatever the composition of your workouts, the focus of your training is aimed at jumpstarting your endurance and power by improving two of the three most widely discussed factors for endurance performance:
1. Maximal aerobic capacity (V02 max)
2. The so-called lactate threshold (LT)
Building a loftier LT (a.k.a. Functional Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, or OBLA) and maximizing aerobic capacity is a good thing if you want to go faster. After all, LT is often thought of as being the most important predictor of performance for endurance athletes. However, if you are going to run, ride, or swim to your potential this season, you must also have superior economy and effciency in all of your sport specifc movements. Being more effcient is critical for your overall fnish and performance, and might be the most overlooked aspect of your “ftness” during daily training, especially as “race preparation” in-season training commences. To put it bluntly: if you only focus your training on producing more power without looking at ways to use less energy while you produce that power, then you are missing out on what could be the key to your strongest fnish and fastest result.
Economy as it relates to endurance exercise is generally defned as “the
oxygen cost to move at a certain speed or generate a certain power output.” Think of it this way: If your movement skills are not as effcient, more energy is required for you to perform and move at a certain speed or intensity. Conversely, the more economical you are, the less oxygen and fuel is required to perform at that intensity. If you are like most athletes, your goal is to go as fast as you can during your event, and most importantly, fnish strong! To do that, you’re going to have to dole out your energy carefully, conserving precious glycogen and burning FFAs predominantly as a fuel source. Every single thing you can do in training to create more effcient movement patterns should result in less energy burned, allowing you to go longer, faster, and fnish strong.
Merging science, practical experience, and common sense
So much has been written in the scientifc literature about economy for our sports, that when I began to do my own research as well as speak to a variety of experts and other coaches on the topic, I was overwhelmed with not only a huge amount of data, but also a wide variety of opinions!
My goal with this article is to summarize and merge some of the latest science, my own experience, and common sense together, to give you some practical tips that you can apply in your next training session and beyond. If you apply some of these tips and practice your sport smartly with a heightened awareness, patience, and persistence, you should see your speed and power increase at the same or lower effort.
Keep in mind as you read this article that in nearly every instance, human
beings tend to improve effciency the most at speeds which they most frequently practice. It makes sense to spend as much time as possible during training at the speed at which you intend to race, so that effciency at that speed will be optimized. The law of specifcity applies!
Cycling
Improving your cycling effciency even a little not only impacts how fast you can ride, it also could potentially have a dramatic impact on how well you can run later on. That is, every bit of energy saved on the bike will be realized, perhaps hours later, when you are on the run and hanging on for dear life trying to keep the wheels from falling off. With that in mind, when discussing cycling effciency, the two areas that deserve the most attention here are:
1. Optimal cadence
2. Aero-positioning
Cadence: Few topics have been more widely discussed and debated in cycling forums and coaching circles than cadence. The question we all have is: what is the most economical and effective way to pedal? Is it different for “regular” road biking vs. triathlon, where we are required to run after riding?
Despite what many of us have thought, the research to date has been consistent in showing that a “relatively lower cadence is more effcient than a higher cadence. However, the most effcient cadence changes with power output.”
Specifcally, as power output increases, the most effcient cadence also increases,
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'07 Inside Tri All-Americans : Hammer athletes rock! : Steve Born
The January/February edition of Inside Triathlon (Vol 23/Issue 1) included their choices for All-American in duathlon and triathlon. According to the magazine, “Triathlete selections are based on 2007 performances at the USA Triathlon Olympic-distance national championship, International Triathlon Union Olympic-distance world championship and Ford Ironman world championship. Duathlete selections are based on 2007 performances at the USAT short-course national championship and ITU short-course world championship”
We’d like to recognize Hammer Nutrition athletes who made this prestigious list. CONGRATULATIONS! (If you were on the Inside Triathlon list but we somehow forgot to mention you, please let us know and we’ll recognize you in the next issue of EN!)
Note: An asterisk (*) before a name signifes Inside Triathlon’s choice as the best in each age group.
Duathlon - Women
30-34 Suzanne Huelster – New Jersey
35-39 Laura Wiley – Oregon
45-49 Sheila Power – Wisconsin
* Kristin Villopoto – N. Carolina 50-54 Cheryl Hart – Kentucky
Heather Leach – Washington 60-64 Ellouise Morse – Washington
Virginia Poyner – Florida 75-79 * Margie Stahl – Maryland
Duathlon - Men
25-29 *Aaron Wahls – Illinois
35-39 Richard Bailey – North Carolina
* Casey Williams – Pennsylvania 40-44 Brian Stern – Ohio
45-49
Bruce Geise – Florida
55-59
Jean-Pierre Bacle – Virginia
65-69
* Ron Lemerich – Ohio
Warren Taylor – Pennsylvania 70-74 Leonard Taylor – Pennsylvania
Triathlon - Women
20-24 April Gellatly – Georgia
* Canielle Keho – Colorado
45-49
Pippa Michaels – New Jersey 50-54 * Laura Sophiea – Michigan
60-64
Patricia Kimper – California
Cindy Rach – Washington 65-69 Sharon Blount – Georgia
75-79
Molly Hayes – Montana
Triathlon - Men
20-24 Nicholas Dason – New York
Brian Monaghan – Florida 40-44 Brian Bich – Minnesota
Stephan Schwarze – Texas
45-49
Rob Chance – Oklahoma
            Patrick High – Florida
            Steve Pyle – Connecticut
            * Tony Schiller – Minnesota
55-59
* Jim Bruskewitz – Wisconsin
65-69
Richard Clark – Georgia
70-74
Jon Adamson – Georgia
80-84
Charley French – Idaho
Great clothes at unbeatable prices
HOT TIPS : REM Caps' melatonin component - not just for sleep enhancement
REM Caps : Better sleep = better performance
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ECONOMY from page 54
to a point. When I say “relatively” lower, I’m referring to +/- 70 rpms, compared to 80, 90, and even 100.
What many of us have learned from our own riding experience is that if we just ride and don’t worry too much about how fast we’re pedaling, our legs will tend to fnd the cadence that they prefer and that cadence often ends up being the most effcient for us. Think of it as the evolutionary process often referred to as “branching and pruning,” or self-selection. For example, if you are more of a novice rider, you are likely searching out what feels natural through training (branching) and if you are more experienced, you have been gradually zeroing in on your own optimal pedal stroke and naturally weeding out unnecessary muscle activation or wasted motions (pruning), learning to automatically relax the muscles you don’t need to pedal, thereby conserving energy.
Here are some tips to help you create a more effcient pedal stroke and thus become a more economical cyclist:
1. Train at a large variety of cadences (fast, medium, and slow) as this variation can help elicit even greater adaptation by challenging your coordination, forcing your neuromuscular system to adapt and fnd new and better ways to be more effcient. Along the same line, include at least one ride per week where you take some time during that ride to focus on “non-preferential” gearing and cadence. For example, if you prefer to pedal at 90-100rpms, include segments of 1 to 10 or 20 minutes straight, at 60-70rpms, and vice versa. Get out of your comfort zone to become more effcient!
2. Do multiple feld tests for your LT or FTP using a variety of cadences to determine which cadence produces the most power output. You could potentially do three: one at your chosen cadence, one at a slower than preferred cadence, and one at a faster than preferred cadence. What worked best for you? What provided the greatest power for the least effort?
3. Repetition and frequency is absolutely KEY for developing greater effciency. The laws of specifcity defnitely apply. So, be sure that when you zero in on your optimal cadence range, that you practice
that cadence during your “event specifc” training rides.
Positioning: The other topic of great importance for triathletes when considering how effcient they are is aerodynamics and positioning. In a triathlon, aerodynamic drag sucks up most of your power and most of that is from the rider, so making your body more “slippery” when you are sitting on the bike will provide more free speed and improve effciency.
While this also is a topic with widely varying opinions, there are some universally accepted concepts:
1. Improving your body’s aero position is accomplished primarily by reducing frontal area. An optimal
position aero-wise has the front of the torso horizontal. Being properly set up with aero-bars is key to achieving this, versus a more traditional “road setup.” According to Todd Kenyon of TTBikeFit. com, “the rest of the bike must be set up properly to accommodate this position or the rider will be uncomfortable, will lose power, be unstable, or any combination thereof.” In general, most experts agree that a standard road frame does not have the right geometry for this – you need a steeper seat angle and a more slack head angle to balance the rider and allow him to generate power in a low position.
2. Most experts agree: It is possible to be very comfortable in a very effective “aero” position and uncomfortable in a very NON-aero position. Despite what you have heard, power, aerodynamics, and comfort are not mutually exclusive, and all can greatly effect how effcient you are. Keep working on this until you get it right. You can be powerful, aero, and comfortable!
3. If you are relatively new to the sport, the biggest potential gain in speed and effciency can be gained by going to a tri-geometry frame, aero-bars, and a proper ft.
4. The next level or “bang for your buck”
in improving cycling effciency is to get an aero-helmet, followed by aero wheels and then an aero frame.
5. Todd feels that while an aero frame is not necessarily a huge time saver, aero frames are now comparatively priced to conventional frames. If you are considering a purchase, why not
get something that might make you a little faster (aero tubes) vs. a round tube frame.
Based upon the above, it is important to be sure you are ft by a triathlon-specifc ft person – a standard local bike shop road ft will not work as well to help you become more comfortable, powerful, AND slippery in an aerodynamic position.
One last thing: while it doesn’t apply specifcally to the topic of cadence or aerodynamics, one other factor that appears to have a relatively large impact on effciency is your foot, or ankle-joint position. During the down stroke, your feet should not be pointed down (plantar fexed), or pointed up (dorsi-fexed), they should be neutral. The research clearly states that “a neutral position (neither dorsi or plantar fexed) may reduce fatigue, preserve gross effciency, and even maximize force.” Bottom line: check your position and keep that ankle neutral to preserve energy and pedal more powerfully.
Running
Every triathlete knows that the key to a successful race is being able to run strong off the bike and fnish strong across the line. For example, there’s no such thing as a strong swim or bike leg IF it is accompanied by a poor run. Clearly, one of the goals of every triathlete’s training program has to be to decrease the energy cost of running. If you can do that, any speed you run will be a lower percentage of your maximum and will be easier to establish and sustain all the way to the fnish tape.

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When we think about being more effcient runners, we need to consider the fact that nearly 50% of the energy needed to run comes from “elastic energy return” of our muscles. To summarize this important concept of “reactive” energy reuse, each time your foot hits the ground, energy is stored in the key muscles and tendons around the knee, ankle, feet, hips, and legs. All of these muscles are stretched and this stretching process stores energy. Your body and in particular, your legs, essentially act like reactive “springs.” When all of these soft tissues recoil elastically during toe-off, they return approximate 90% of the work required to stretch them. If your legs couldn’t store this energy, your heart and leg muscles would have to work a lot harder just so you could run at a fraction of the speed.
In my opinion, the two most effective ways to improve your ability to run faster while decreasing the energy cost of that speed is to improve your running-specifc strength and spring­like action of your muscles (so that you can store more energy and release it more effectively during push-off), and improve your running form (so that less energy is wasted or lost with more of the kinetic energy of the stride preserved).
When it comes to
running form, there are many different opinions on what is the most effcient and correct foot strike, and whether or not you should try and change what you naturally do. One factor of which there is no debate is that in order to run effciently, you must take the “brakes off” during foot strike, also known as the stance phase of the gait cycle. In order to minimize any braking action, you need to have a high degree of control, coordination and “quickness.” Owen Anderson, PhD states “Our nervous system must be highly reactive, so that muscular actions which inhibit forward propulsion can be inhibited from the moment of impact and muscular actions
which boost propulsion can be instigated without hesitation.”
In addition, when your foot hits the ground during stance, your leg muscles need to be frm and stiff enough so that your legs don’t collapse as they work to stabilize your body against ground impact forces. All of the extra work required to restore your body’s equilibrium and prepare for toe-off zaps energy and hurts effciency.
Here are some tips to help you become a more effcient runner:
1. Reduce and minimize ground contact time. Whether you are a mid foot or heel striker, you will be more effcient and faster if you can get your feet UP off the ground quickly with each foot strike. Integrate some exercises and drills into your running routine such as hopping movements, in-place “accelerations,” one-leg squats, and bounding, all of which force your legs to act like coil springs, compressing slightly and then recoiling quickly. When you run, see if you can run more quietly and “lightly,” both of which enhance a quick foot strike and minimize ground contact time.
2. Take off the brakes by integrating a “pawback” action in your foot strike. Making sure your feet are moving backward (I refer to this as “pawback) as they strike the ground under your hips, will minimize any braking action, limit deceleration, and improve your effciency. A more effective pawback will minimize any up/down movement during your stride. This vertical “oscillation” of your body hurts effciency.
3. To more fully integrate the above into your running, videotape yourself or get video analysis done by someone else, to see what you are actually doing in your stride. This makes any adjustments easier to execute. Sometimes a picture is
worth a thousand words!
4. Incorporate regular periods of very FAST running into your routine, regardless of your goal race distance, to enhance the quickness and explosive forward propulsion in your stride.
5. Include some running specifc strength training into your routine, to improve the forcefulness of contractions and increase muscle reactivity. Exercises like step-ups, lunges, one-leg squatting, and pawback leg- swings work great if done in a progressive way and are integrated into a smart training routine.
6. Include some hill training in your training routine. In a classic study conducted in Sweden, hill training was shown to improve economy by an average of 3% in 11 well-trained runners over a 12-week period.
Remember that some of these exercises, including hill training, that do a great job of enhancing strength and effciency carry a higher risk of injury if done too aggressively without adequate recovery, especially if you have very little history of explosive types of training. To be able to effectively train your nervous system and minimize injury risk, start small with low reps and sets and only integrate these exercises when you are fully rested and not overly fatigued. Train smart!
Swimming
The swim portion of a triathlon provides a huge opportunity to either save energy (good!), or waste energy (not so good!). Ideally, you will be able to use as little energy as possible during the swim so it feels like a warm-up to the rest of your day. If you can do that, you have more energy available in the late stages of the race when energy reserves are low, fatigue is high, and your race is ready to be made or broken during the run. Comfort level in the water, swimming skills and strength, and conditioning, all combine to either help you smartly save energy, or waste it and use it up.
To make matters more complicated, we need to acknowledge that swimming is an activity that is obviously very different from running and cycling because you are not pushing against something solid when in water the way you do with your feet locked into the pedals or pushing off against the ground.

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What’s more, actually measuring the effciency of a triathlete or any swimmer is diffcult to do because most methods used are imprecise. Add the fact that all kinds of different opinions exist among swim coaches, triathlon coaches, and scientists on what are the most effcient stroke rates, stroke lengths, and approaches to training for the sport, and what you have is a major dilemma!
Many age-group triathletes spend huge amounts of time driving to and from the pool and in swimming workouts, yet do not improve their swimming effciency. As we consider the most effective ways to train for the triathlon swim and improve our effciency, there are three important questions I believe we all need to ask:
1. Where should the focus of our swim training be in order to maximize effciency?
2. Are we getting maximum beneft from the time we are spending?
3. Is there a better, more effective way to do it?
In my opinion, for many, the focus is often too much on these factors:
1. Accumulating lots of yardage without regard to stroke quality. (Remember that your neuromuscular coordination and skill directly impact how much energy you use).
2. Too much focus on chasing the pace clock or making an interval, even when form is falling apart, which only reinforces poor technical habits.
3. Too little focus on developing the necessary upper body fexibility to swim correctly.
4. Too much endless focus on gliding longer and “perfecting” body position, without enough focus on increasing stroke rate, so you can take control in your open water environment, rather than the other way around.
I should note that one area where there is no debate: wearing a wetsuit when allowed to and then drafting behind a swimmer in front of you when possible are two ways to absolutely improve your effciency in a triathlon! Do it!
Here are some basic tips that will help simplify this process so that you can use immediately to maximize your swim training time and create a more effcient stroke:
1. Being comfortable in the open water is hugely important for effciency. If you are a novice, learn to become more comfortable in this environment by getting out there often, and by working on both skills and strength. Do what you fear the most and over time, your comfort level will improve and effciency will
increase. Along the same line, don’t forget the power of your breath and the forced extended exhale to fully enhance relaxation and thus use less energy.
2. Making your body more “slippery” and improving your streamlining so that you create less drag throughout the entire stroke cycle is absolutely essential to be more effcient. For the average age-group triathlete, the secret to a more streamlined position is rooted in improving fexibility through the shoulders, arms, and upper back. Being more fexible in these areas allows you to get into those important glide positions that increase length of reach, and simultaneously eliminate drag, allowing it to be done in a relaxed way. Greater fexibility means that it does not take excess energy to create these positions with your body. Bottom line: being more fexible means that without having to swim one extra yard, you will be more effcient and thus go faster with far less effort. Commit to the stretching that is necessary so that you can be more streamlined throughout every phase of the stroke, and then practice correctly (by applying that improved fexibility more effciently).
3. Train daily to be able to maintain a higher overall stroke rate, especially if your focus has been to glide longer and kick more. Stroking a bit faster will
allow you to put more constant effective pressure on the water so that you can reduce the intensity of your kick and spend less time decelerating during the stroke. “Swimming Golf” is a good practice drill that can be used to help you fnd your ideal stroke rate.
4. Generally speaking, you will gain more in effciency if you can shift your swim training away from a mindset of accumulating yardage without any regard for the quality of your stroke, to a stricter approach. Quality repetition (over and over, done the right way!) is what creates effciency!
5. Stop chasing a pace clock to make an
interval at the expense of the kind of correct technique that, practiced over time, will make material improvements in effciency and strength.
6. Begin to start using various dryland training tools such as stretch cords and the Vasa Ergometer to effectively build the functional strength and fexibility that you need to be more effcient.
7. Lastly, spend a signifcant amount of your actual training time practicing at the speed and intensity that you plan on racing at.
There’s one more element that applies to all three sports and that is relaxation. Have you ever stopped to notice how relaxed and smooth the best triathletes look when they are competing? When we swim, bike, and run, we are continually moving between a state of relaxation and tension both physically AND mentally. While we obviously need that tension at times, if you are gritting your teeth and trying to force and fght yourself through a workout or race, you may be severely lessening the potential beneft AND enjoyment you would have derived from that session, AND you are defnitely hurting your effciency. What the elite athletes who are silky-smooth and relaxed know is that:
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The Cycling House : Coming to Montana this summer! : Owen Gue
The Cycling House that you’ve come to know and love in Tucson is opening it’s doors in Whitefsh, Montana! The house will be open from June 20th until July 31st.
For the road and tri folks we’ll be nestled among endless secondary roads that will provide hours of riding with very limited traffc. Glacier National Park, one of the most beautiful places in the world, is a short shuttle away. There you’ll fnd an epic climb on the Going-to-the-Sun Road which peaks at Logan Pass, the 6646’ high-point on the Continental Divide in Montana. Long loops around Flathead Lake and Koocanusa Reservoir will also be offered.
For the mountain bikers, we’ll have some of the most popular mountain biking destinations in the state just a short
shuttle trip away. Single track, mixed with gnarly climbs and fast descents, create the perfect dirt riding medley. The added bonus of being located near Whitefsh Mountain Resort and the Tally Lake area will make it so that we are always a short spin away from sweet trails and picture perfect views.
You’ll also be able to take a tour of the Hammer Nutrition headquarters and meet their staff. Brian, Steve, and other Hammer staffers will participate on rides as their schedules permit. Recreational opportunities for non-riding family members are almost unlimited.
If you’re looking for a great way to see Montana, and you’d like to do some unbelievable riding while you’re there, then you defnitely have to check out The Cycling House.
Rates are as follows -$225/night for 7+ nights $250/night for 4-6 nights $275/night for 1-3 nights
Rates include gourmet, healthy food, luxurious lodging, expert guided and fully supported rides, airport pick­up and drop off, bike assembly, basic maintenance, and more!
For more info, check out www.cyclinghouse.com
• When your body’s natural rhythm and timing are altered, less fuid and less effcient movements use up precious energy reserves and increase the risk of cramping and even injury.
• The best chance for a true “breakthrough” performance can only happen if our focus is on being more relaxed, rather than trying to fght through and force more power from our legs!
• Taking at least one session each week in each sport where you practice and refne skill and technique will lead to more relaxed, more effcient sport specifc movements.
• Your ability to completely relax your body AND mind, while simultaneously moving at the fastest possible speed, is a very important determinant of how
successful you will be in your most important events!
In my own practical experience as an endurance athlete, when I am able to really focus on staying task oriented and being “in the moment,” emptying my mind of anxious thoughts and judgments, I instantly feel a mental and physical response that allows me to relax more fully and I know when that happens, I am more effcient. I am able to breathe more deeply from my lower abdomen, which in turn lowers my heart rate and any additional tension I might be feeling. This makes it easier to move through a greater range of motion and helps me pick up my pace even further without an increase in heart rate or in my perceived exertion. I know that with nothing more than my enhanced focus and breathing, I am able to immediately change the way I feel and the way I perform!
To summarize, whether its cycling, running, or swimming, your neuromuscular coordination (skill), specifcity of training speed and intensity (specifcity), and relaxation, are clearly the most important elements when considering how to best improve your effciency. Think of it this way: Through correct and frequent practice, your nervous system learns and develops the ability to recruit the most effcient muscles at just the right time for a particular speed or intensity while being relaxed, while also inhibiting any unnecessary wasted movements. And, practices done at speeds that refect exactly how you want to perform are much more effective at improving effciency. Once again, the law of specifcity applies! Best of luck!
© Pursuit Fitness, LLC, all rights reserved, 2008. References available upon request.
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Race Report : Hammer Athletes
Kathleen Allen
OK, actually it is a “crash and recovery report.” My name is Kathleen Allen and I live in Evergreen, Colorado. I am a triathlete and Hammer product user. You listed me as a Hammer Product user who qualifed for ITU World Championships in Hamburg, Germany by placing ninth in the 35-39 female division at USAT Age Group National Champioships 2007.
Well...on Aug 24 (5
days before I was
scheduled to depart
for Germany) a trash
truck turned directly
in front of me during
a training ride. We
collided. I broke my
neck, 2 bones in my
back, 1 rib and both wrists. I had a
concussion and damage to my carotid
artery so they put me on blood thinner.
I had a massive hematoma in my right
thigh that bled out and required 6
surgeries. They were able to save my leg, though! I had to have 2 angiograms and a stint placed in my damaged left carotid artery. Not fun! During the week I was in ICU, my sister kept trying to get some kind of nutrition in me. Ironically, she got a package of Recoverite at Wild Oats.
She bought it because the description made it sound so good for recovery and she wanted me to recover (my sister is not an athlete...she’s a chef).
Anyway, I have been on a long road of recovery. Three weeks in the hospital left me about 12 pounds lighter than my original 100 lbs. I lost all my muscle. Rehab has been hard but I have found Hammer Whey really great
for helping me put muscle back on and support all of the work I am trying to do. I hope to start training enough to need Hammer Gel soon!
I have attached a photo of me on Christmas Eve...exactly 4 months after the crash. I thank you for all of your great products but mostly for all of the wonderful information you send out about good nutrition. My doctors are all amazed at how I am recovering from this near fatal crash. They have never seen anything like it. You guys helped me learn about how important nutrition is for performance. I have made nutrition a priority in my recovery. I am also putting forth the same effort that I used for training and competing into going to physical therapy and doing the exercises. I am taking my recovery very seriously. It is a full time job that I did not have time for! I hope to see you on the road some day soon but until then, I’m in the basement on my trainer!
Kathleen Allen
Jamie and Wendi Dial
My wife and I traveled down to Alabama a few weeks ago for the Mt. Cheaha 50k. The race course was beautiful and the terrain was pretty rough. I can easily say that it’s the hardest 50k around these parts. Anyhow, I managed to win the Men’s race and set a new course record by about 20 minutes. I owe a great deal of that to my bombproof nutrition plan. I’ve been following the guidelines for Pre Race Meals and doing everything right during the event. In my bottles, I mixed 1 scoop Perpetuem, 1 scoop Heed, and 2 scoops of Endurolytes Powder for the Perfect RACE BLEND. Also, to make the day even sweeter, my wife Wendi won the Women’s race!
Annie Creighton
I’ve been nordic racing exclusively on Hammer Nutrition products for about three years now. Knowing I could basically rely on the effcacy of your products during the grueling Coureur des Bois last week made the difference for me (1st place female in the 90K Skate). Thank you for stepping up this year and being such a major sponsor. As a fellow Montanan, I tell everyone about the virtues of your products and am always blown away at how many events
you sponsor.
At this event, all 5 aid stations did an incredible job providing racers with Hamer Gel, HEED (which was mixed to perfection), and an assortment of fruits, hot drinks, etc. I was able to do the whole 90K on 5 Hammer Gels, 4 cups of HEED, and 1 gluten free rice bar.
Thanks again, and I hope to see your sponsorship continue for this unique and tough event.
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David Jones
Thanks for your long and continuing support of ultra cycling. Your fne products were a major contributor to my success in RAAM 2007, which I successfully completed, setting a new record for the solo male 60+ division. My elapsed time of 12 days, 1 hr, and 15 minutes broke the old record by nearly 6 hours. I used a variety of your products including Endurolytes, Race Caps Supreme, Anti-Fatigue Caps, Mito Caps, Premium Insurance Caps, Race Day Boost, Recoverite, and of course, Hammer Gel. Based on advice from Steve Born, I had the crew make sure I took an hourly dose of Race Caps Supreme, Anti-Fatigue Caps, Mito Caps, and Endurolytes. I took the Premium Insurance Caps and Recoverite just before going down for daily sleep breaks. I took Hammer Gel anytime I was having a tough period but found it especially useful as a pick-me-up during those diffcult pre-dawn hours. My favorite Hammer Gel favors had been Vanilla and Raspberry, standbys from
thousands of miles of training and ultra-racing miles since I got into the sport in 2003. However, I started using the Tropical favor just before RAAM and it became my favorite.
For the 2008 season I plan to race solo RAAM again with the objective of bettering my time from 2007 and to complete a ffth solo Furnace Creek 508.
ENissue58-17
Yours truly, David ‘Donkey’ Jones
Derrek Nazelrod
Roberta Gonzales
I am a Weather Anchor for CBS 5 TV in San Francisco on the 5, 6, and 11pm newscast.
This photo is from the Charity Media Challenge portion of the Tour Of California this past Sunday in Palo Alto, California. Before the Pros took off, we had our challenge (5 media competitors and
35 people who bought into the race to compete against us). There was a total of 40 racers.
No podium for me, but we raised a ton of money for charity, my heart is flled and it was the thrill of a lifetime racing on the same course with the Pros! I am attaching a link to my journal at CBS 5 for your reading pleasure! http://cbs5.com/roberta
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Race Report : Hammer Athletes
The Randle Kids
Dear Hammer Nutrition,
I am a mom of three very active young atheletes. Competitive soccer teams, basketball teams, tennis tournaments... Like many athletic families today, our weeks are spent at practice and our weekends at games and tournaments. My kids play their sports hard. And during our hot summer months in Sacramento, I felt I was losing the battle against Gatorade and favored sports drinks...until I discovered Hammer Nutrition.
I was introduced to your products by a friend who suggested I check out your website. I was continuously complaining to her about how hard it was to keep my kids away from Gatorade! I knew it was full of sugar and couldn’t be good for them. I tried to get them to drink only water. I tried to get my friend’s husband, Randy Work (an ironman athlete) to tell my kids the horrors of Gatorade and sugared sports drinks and that water should be their only “sport” drink.
Well he set me straight!!! He taught me that they really do need the electrolytes and the chromium polynicotinate to be replenished during and after long workouts. He told us about your great company and it has changed our lives! I began to research the products and what would work for my kids. We ordered samples and they did taste tests to see what favors they liked. We began reading labels and realized that commercial sports drinks DID give you some of the things you need, but they also give you so much added sugar and preservatives. The sugar gives kids a lift-
and then drops them down.
Now they mix up their own bottles of HEED. They drink the HEED during a regular soccer game or tennis match INSTEAD of the sugar sports drinks their friends drink. During a longer tournament, or during a workout that lasts over an hour and half, they switch to Sustained Energy. And they fnish with Recoverite.
Though it was hard at frst to get them to make the switch, (one daughter still doesn’t like the taste) they have noticed the change in their performance. They feel like HEED is their secret weapon. No one knows what they are drinking in their Hammer Nutrition bottle! They watch their opponent guzzling their red or blue colored sugary sport drink and secretly know that they are going to crash, while my little Hammer Nutrition athletes will be able to keep on going!!!
We are so thankful to have found a healthy alternative that boosts their performance and gives them the competitive edge. Proper nutrition has always been important to our family, and now with Hammer Nutrition, I can continue to know I am helping my family make healthy choices- even with their “sports drinks.”
Thank you, Kellie Randle
Annie 11 - tennis, soccer, basketball, snowboarding
Jake 9 - soccer, basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, snowboarding
Jillie Kate 7 - soccer, basketball, tennis, ballet, clogging, skiing
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Randy Profeta
Last weekend I did an early season warm-up with the season’s frst 24-hour solo at the 24-Hours at the Old Pueblo. Hammer is one of the sponsors. If any of you MTB racers are looking for a great early-season race or a place to do your frst solo 24, this is it. And it’s a bargain as far as the entry fees go.
After over-nighting in Tucson, I headed out to the venue Friday morning to set up our pit area and maybe pre-ride the course. As we headed north to Oracle, we were greeted with snow showers and 30 degree temps. When we turned off the highway, we had 12 miles of sloppy dirt road and mud driving ahead of us. It was snowing when we got to the venue so we set up our EZ-Up and headed back to our hotel to warm up.
It did not stop raining until about 4 AM Saturday morning. Fortunately, the course dried out really well and there was only one mud hole that we had to navigate during Lap 1.
The course was just over 16 miles with
1,200 feet of climbing and trillions of cacti to contend with. If you fell here, there would be blood. And pain. And embarrassment as you ride with a Cholla cactus dangling from your arm, leg, or other extremity. But this is a great course for solos and single-speeders as there are really no steep or prolonged climbs.
There were over 125 soloists and thousands of team riders. The frst lap was a real Los Angeles traffc jam, but it settled into a nice rhythm on Lap 2 and beyond.
I fueled almost exclusively with Perpetuem and Hammer Gel. I had some fruit chunks and a PBJ but other than that stayed with an all liquid diet. Midday Saturday I was sitting at 35th out of 92 racers and was hoping to move up over night.
I was feeling great and had zero stomach or nutritional issues. I was taking Mito Caps, Race Caps Supreme, Anti-Fatigue Caps, Endurolytes, and had some Tissue
Rejuvenator and Energy Surge on hand. What I did not have was warm shoes or shoe covers.
I was doing fne until it started getting cold in the evening. I never expected the wet weather which had not been predicted. There was a water crossing as you came back into the transition area and my feet got wet every lap as I splashed across it. My feet started getting painfully cold and I was having problem clipping into my pedals. I came off the course for a while to get some warmth back in my body and change my socks. I resumed racing at about midnight and kept on going non-stop til the end of the race on Sunday.
The results: I fnished 15th out of an open feld of 92.
I hope you’ll continue to support these guys as it is desert racing at its best! I’ll be back again, now that I know how to remove Cholla quills.
Rebecca Johns
Hammer Nutrition went with Rebecca on a recent trip to Ladakh in northern India. While there to do a service project, Rebecca had the opportunity to spend a day trekking with a guide. Here she is at 16,000’ on a pass in the Himalayas with the nutrition that helped get her there.
Sandra Foskey
MY frst 70.3! MiamiMan 70.3, Miami, Florida November 11,2007. Used only Hammer products during training and competition...will NEVER use anything else again!
Send Race Report email to anock@hammernutrition.com, copyright-free photos please.
1.800.336.1977 / Page 63

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Inside this issue : our biggest yet!
New Product Flavors & Sizes
HEED, Whey, Recoverite
Hammer Body Care Products
Cool Feet, Hammer Balm, Soni-Pure
Fructose Called Most Dangerous Sugar
What are you consuming?
Product Spotlight
Mito Caps
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Amanda McIntosh
Tissue Rejuvenator
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Hammer Camps
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